I was exploring the Java 8 source and found this particular part of code very surprising:

//defined in IntPipeline.java
@Override
public final OptionalInt reduce(IntBinaryOperator op) {
    return evaluate(ReduceOps.makeInt(op));
}

@Override
public final OptionalInt max() {
    return reduce(Math::max); //this is the gotcha line
}

//defined in Math.java
public static int max(int a, int b) {
    return (a >= b) ? a : b;
}

Is Math::max something like a method pointer? How does a normal static method get converted to IntBinaryOperator?

  • 40
    It's syntactic sugar to have the compiler auto-generate interface implementations based on the function you provide (to make the whole lambda thingy easier to use with existing code bases). – Neet Nov 15 '13 at 12:51
  • 2
    java.dzone.com/articles/java-lambda-expressions-vs might help, didn't look to deep in the topic – Pontus Backlund Nov 15 '13 at 12:51
  • 7
    @Neet it's not exactly "syntactic sugar", unless you can say for what. i.e. "x is syntactic sugar for y". – Ingo Nov 15 '13 at 13:03
  • 5
    @Ingo it creates a new object of lambda every time I use it. TestingLambda$$Lambda$2/8460669 and TestingLambda$$Lambda$3/11043253 were created on two invocations. – Narendra Pathai Nov 15 '13 at 13:30
  • 11
    Lambdas and method references are not "plain old anonymous inner classes". See programmers.stackexchange.com/a/181743/59134 . Yes, if necessary, new classes and instances are created on-the-fly, if necessary, but only if necessary. – Stuart Marks Nov 15 '13 at 22:47

14 Answers 14

up vote 855 down vote accepted

Usually, one would call the reduce method using Math.max(int, int) as follows:

reduce(new IntBinaryOperator() {
    int applyAsInt(int left, int right) {
        return Math.max(left, right);
    }
});

That requires a lot of syntax for just calling Math.max. That's where lambda expressions come into play. Since Java 8 it is allowed to do the same thing in a much shorter way:

reduce((int left, int right) -> Math.max(left, right));

How does this work? The java compiler "detects", that you want to implement a method that accepts two ints and returns one int. This is equivalent to the formal parameters of the one and only method of interface IntBinaryOperator (the parameter of method reduce you want to call). So the compiler does the rest for you - it just assumes you want to implement IntBinaryOperator.

But as Math.max(int, int) itself fulfills the formal requirements of IntBinaryOperator, it can be used directly. Because Java 7 does not have any syntax that allows a method itself to be passed as an argument (you can only pass method results, but never method references), the :: syntax was introduced in Java 8 to reference methods:

reduce(Math::max);

Note that this will be interpreted by the compiler, not by the JVM at runtime! Although it produces different bytecodes for all three code snippets, they are semantically equal, so the last two can be considered to be short (and probably more efficient) versions of the IntBinaryOperator implementation above!

(See also Translation of Lambda Expressions)

:: is called Method Reference. It is basically a reference to a single method. I.e. it refers to an existing method by name.

Short Explanation:
Below is an example of a reference to a static method:

class Hey {
     public static double square(double num){
        return Math.pow(num, 2);
    }
}

Function<Double, Double> square = Hey::square;
double ans = square.apply(23d);

square can be passed around just like object references and triggered when needed. In fact, it can be just as easily used as a reference to "normal" methods of objects as static ones. For example:

class Hey {
    public double square(double num) {
        return Math.pow(num, 2);
    }
}

Hey hey = new Hey();
Function<Double, Double> square = hey::square;
double ans = square.apply(23d);

Function above is a functional interface. To fully understand ::, it is important to understand functional interfaces as well. Plainly, a functional interface is an interface with just one abstract method.

Examples of functional interfaces include Runnable, Callable, and ActionListener.

Function above is a functional interface with just one method: apply. It takes one argument and produces a result.


The reason why ::s are awesome is that:

Method references are expressions which have the same treatment as lambda expressions (...), but instead of providing a method body, they refer an existing method by name.

E.g. instead of writing the lambda body

Function<Double, Double> square = (Double x) -> x * x;

You can simply do

Function<Double, Double> square = Hey::square;

At runtime, these two square methods behave exactly the same as each other. The bytecode may or may not be the same (though, for the above case, the same bytecode is generated; compile the above and check with javap -c).

The only major criterion to satisfy is: the method you provide should have a similar signature to the method of the functional interface you use as object reference.

The below is illegal:

Supplier<Boolean> p = Hey::square; // illegal

square expects an argument and returns a double. The get method in Supplier expects an argument but doesn't return anything. Thus, this results in an error.

A method reference refers to the method of a functional interface. (As mentioned, functional interfaces can have only one method each).

Some more examples: the accept method in Consumer takes an input but doesn't return anything.

Consumer<Integer> b1 = System::exit;   // void exit(int status)
Consumer<String[]> b2 = Arrays::sort;  // void sort(Object[] a)
Consumer<String> b3 = MyProgram::main; // void main(String... args)

class Hey {
    public double getRandom() {
        return Math.random();
    }
}

Callable<Double> call = hey::getRandom;
Supplier<Double> call2 = hey::getRandom;
DoubleSupplier sup = hey::getRandom;
// Supplier is functional interface that takes no argument and gives a result

Above, getRandom takes no argument and returns a double. So any functional interface that satisfies the criteria of: take no argument and return double can be used.

Another example:

Set<String> set = new HashSet<>();
set.addAll(Arrays.asList("leo","bale","hanks"));
Predicate<String> pred = set::contains;
boolean exists = pred.test("leo");

In case of parameterized types:

class Param<T> {
    T elem;
    public T get() {
        return elem;
    }

    public void set(T elem) {
        this.elem = elem;
    }

    public static <E> E returnSame(E elem) {
        return elem;
    }
}

Supplier<Param<Integer>> obj = Param<Integer>::new;
Param<Integer> param = obj.get();
Consumer<Integer> c = param::set;
Supplier<Integer> s = param::get;

Function<String, String> func = Param::<String>returnSame;

Method references can have different styles, but fundamentally they all mean the same thing and can simply be visualized as lambdas:

  1. A static method (ClassName::methName)
  2. An instance method of a particular object (instanceRef::methName)
  3. A super method of a particular object (super::methName)
  4. An instance method of an arbitrary object of a particular type (ClassName::methName)
  5. A class constructor reference (ClassName::new)
  6. An array constructor reference (TypeName[]::new)

For further reference, see http://cr.openjdk.java.net/~briangoetz/lambda/lambda-state-final.html.

  • 4
    Thank you for the explanation. In summary: '::' use to extract a method that satisfies a FunctionalInterface(lambda): ClassX::staticMethodX, or instanceX::instanceMethodX" – jessarah Jul 13 '16 at 7:57

Yes, that is true. The :: operator is used for method referencing. So, one can extract static methods from classes by using it or methods from objects. The same operator can be used even for constructors. All cases mentioned here are exemplified in the code sample below.

The official documentation from Oracle can be found here.

You can have a better overview of the JDK 8 changes in this article. In the Method/Constructor referencing section a code example is also provided:

interface ConstructorReference {
    T constructor();
}

interface  MethodReference {
   void anotherMethod(String input);
}

public class ConstructorClass {
    String value;

   public ConstructorClass() {
       value = "default";
   }

   public static void method(String input) {
      System.out.println(input);
   }

   public void nextMethod(String input) {
       // operations
   }

   public static void main(String... args) {
       // constructor reference
       ConstructorReference reference = ConstructorClass::new;
       ConstructorClass cc = reference.constructor();

       // static method reference
       MethodReference mr = cc::method;

       // object method reference
       MethodReference mr2 = cc::nextMethod;

       System.out.println(cc.value);
   }
}
  • Fascinating, could you show how mr or mr2 would be used? – Richard Tingle Nov 15 '13 at 13:07
  • a good explanation is the one found here: doanduyhai.wordpress.com/2012/07/14/… – Olimpiu POP Nov 15 '13 at 13:32
  • 1
    @RichardTingle method(Math::max); is invocation and definition of method would be like public static void method(IntBinaryOperator op){System.out.println(op.applyAsInt(1, 2));}. That's how its used. – Narendra Pathai Nov 15 '13 at 13:34
  • 2
    For those familiar with C# it is similar with DelegateType d = new DelegateType(MethodName); – Adrian Zanescu Nov 15 '13 at 17:02

:: is a new operator included in Java 8 that is used to refer a method of an existing class. You can refer static methods and non-static methods of a class.

For referring static methods, the syntax is:

ClassName :: methodName 

For referring non-static methods, the syntax is

objRef :: methodName

And

ClassName :: methodName

The only prerequisite for referring a method is that method exists in a functional interface, which must be compatible with the method reference.

Method references, when evaluated, create an instance of the functional interface.

Found on: http://www.speakingcs.com/2014/08/method-references-in-java-8.html

This is a method reference in Java 8. The oracle documentation is here.

As stated in the documentation...

The method reference Person::compareByAge is a reference to a static method.

The following is an example of a reference to an instance method of a particular object:

class ComparisonProvider {
    public int compareByName(Person a, Person b) {
        return a.getName().compareTo(b.getName());
    }

    public int compareByAge(Person a, Person b) {
        return a.getBirthday().compareTo(b.getBirthday());
    }
}

ComparisonProvider myComparisonProvider = new ComparisonProvider();
Arrays.sort(rosterAsArray, myComparisonProvider::compareByName); 

The method reference myComparisonProvider::compareByName invokes the method compareByName that is part of the object myComparisonProvider. The JRE infers the method type arguments, which in this case are (Person, Person).

  • 2
    but the method 'compareByAge' is not static. – abbas Mar 1 '16 at 6:15
  • 2
    @abbas Nor is compareByName. Hence, you access these non-static methods through the reference operator using an object. If they were static, you could use the class name like ComparisionProvider::someStaticMethod – Seshadri R Jun 11 '17 at 11:51

It seems its little late but here are my two cents. A lambda expression is used to create anonymous methods. It does nothing but call an existing method, but it is clearer to refer to the method directly by its name. And method reference enables us to do that using method-reference operator :: .

Consider the following simple class where each employee has a name and grade.

public class Employee {
    private String name;
    private String grade;

    public Employee(String name, String grade) {
        this.name = name;
        this.grade = grade;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public String getGrade() {
        return grade;
    }

    public void setGrade(String grade) {
        this.grade = grade;
    }
}

Suppose we have a list of employees returned by some method and we want to sort the employees by their grade. We know we can make use of anonymous class as:

    List<Employee> employeeList = getDummyEmployees();

    // Using anonymous class
    employeeList.sort(new Comparator<Employee>() {
           @Override
           public int compare(Employee e1, Employee e2) {
               return e1.getGrade().compareTo(e2.getGrade());
           }
    });

where getDummyEmployee() is some method as:

private static List<Employee> getDummyEmployees() {
        return Arrays.asList(new Employee("Carrie", "C"),
                new Employee("Farhan", "F"),
                new Employee("Brian", "B"),
                new Employee("Donald", "D"),
                new Employee("Adam", "A"),
                new Employee("Evan", "E")
                );
    }

Now we know that Comparator is a Functional Interface. A Functional Interface is the one with exactly one abstract method (though it may contain one or more default or static methods). So we can use lambda expression as:

employeeList.sort((e1,e2) -> e1.getGrade().compareTo(e2.getGrade())); // lambda exp

It seems all good but what if the class Employee also provides similar method:

public class Employee {
    private String name;
    private String grade;
    // getter and setter
    public static int compareByGrade(Employee e1, Employee e2) {
        return e1.grade.compareTo(e2.grade);
    }
}

In this case using the method name itself will be more clear. Hence we can directly refer to method by using method reference as:

employeeList.sort(Employee::compareByGrade); // method reference

As per docs there are four kinds of method references:

+----+-------------------------------------------------------+--------------------------------------+
|    | Kind                                                  | Example                              |
+----+-------------------------------------------------------+--------------------------------------+
| 1  | Reference to a static method                          | ContainingClass::staticMethodName    |
+----+-------------------------------------------------------+--------------------------------------+
| 2  |Reference to an instance method of a particular object | containingObject::instanceMethodName | 
+----+-------------------------------------------------------+--------------------------------------+
| 3  | Reference to an instance method of an arbitrary object| ContainingType::methodName           |
|    | of a particular type                                  |                                      |  
+----+-------------------------------------------------------+--------------------------------------+
| 4  |Reference to a constructor                             | ClassName::new                       |
+------------------------------------------------------------+--------------------------------------+
  • It's a lambda expression (after the lambda calculus) - it has absolutely nothing to do with "lambada" .... – marc_s Jan 16 at 18:06
  • @marc_s I am not sure if I really got your comment. When did I say its lambada expression? – i_am_zero Jan 18 at 4:55
  • I fixed at least three occurrences where you spelled it "lambada" instead of "lambda" – marc_s Jan 18 at 5:22
  • @marc_s - Well in that case it was a typo :) – i_am_zero Jan 18 at 5:26
  • 1
    @marc_s I don't agree - lambda and lambada are both sweet and sexy – metatron Mar 13 at 15:11

:: Operator was introduced in java 8 for method references. A method reference is the shorthand syntax for a lambda expression that executes just ONE method. Here's the general syntax of a method reference:

Object :: methodName

We know that we can use lambda expressions instead of using an anonymous class. But sometimes, the lambda expression is really just a call to some method, for example:

Consumer<String> c = s -> System.out.println(s);

To make the code clearer, you can turn that lambda expression into a method reference:

Consumer<String> c = System.out::println;

The :: is known as method references. Lets say we want to call a calculatePrice method of class Purchase. Then we can write it as:

Purchase::calculatePrice

It can also be seen as short form of writing the lambda expression Because method references are converted into lambda expressions.

  • Can I make nested method references ? e.g. groupingBy( Order::customer::name ) – user1743310 Mar 1 '17 at 11:56

At runtime they behave a exactly the same.The bytecode may/not be same (For above Incase,it generates the same bytecode(complie above and check javaap -c;))

At runtime they behave a exactly the same.method(math::max);,it generates the same math (complie above and check javap -c;))

return reduce(Math::max); is NOT EQUAL to return reduce(max());

But it means, something like this:

IntBinaryOperator myLambda = (a, b)->{(a >= b) ? a : b};//56 keystrokes I had to type -_-
return reduce(myLambda);

You can just save 47 keystrokes if you write like this

return reduce(Math::max);//Only 9 keystrokes ^_^

In java-8 Streams Reducer in simple works is a function which takes two values as input and returns result after some calculation. this result is fed in next iteration.

in case of Math:max function, method keeps returning max of two values passed and in the end you have largest number in hand.

Since many answers here explained well :: behaviour, additionally I would like to clarify that :: operator doesnt need to have exactly same signature as the referring Functional Interface if it is used for instance variables. Lets assume we need a BinaryOperator which has type of TestObject. In traditional way its implemented like this:

BinaryOperator<TestObject> binary = new BinaryOperator<TestObject>() {

        @Override
        public TestObject apply(TestObject t, TestObject u) {

            return t;
        }
    };

As you see in anonymous implementation it requires two TestObject argument and returns a TestObject object as well. To satisfy this condition by using :: operator we can start with a static method:

public class TestObject {


    public static final TestObject testStatic(TestObject t, TestObject t2){
        return t;
    }
}

and then call:

BinaryOperator<TestObject> binary = TestObject::testStatic;

Ok it compiled fine. What about if we need an instance method? Lets update TestObject with instance method:

public class TestObject {

    public final TestObject testInstance(TestObject t, TestObject t2){
        return t;
    }

    public static final TestObject testStatic(TestObject t, TestObject t2){
        return t;
    }
}

Now we can access instance as below:

TestObject testObject = new TestObject();
BinaryOperator<TestObject> binary = testObject::testInstance;

This code compiles fine, but below one not:

BinaryOperator<TestObject> binary = TestObject::testInstance;

My eclipse tell me "Cannot make a static reference to the non-static method testInstance(TestObject, TestObject) from the type TestObject ..."

Fair enough its an instance method, but if we overload testInstance as below:

public class TestObject {

    public final TestObject testInstance(TestObject t){
        return t;
    }

    public final TestObject testInstance(TestObject t, TestObject t2){
        return t;
    }

    public static final TestObject testStatic(TestObject t, TestObject t2){
        return t;
    }
}

And call:

BinaryOperator<TestObject> binary = TestObject::testInstance;

The code will just compile fine. Because it will call testInstance with single parameter instead of double one. Ok so what happened our two parameter? Lets printout and see:

public class TestObject {

    public TestObject() {
        System.out.println(this.hashCode());
    }

    public final TestObject testInstance(TestObject t){
        System.out.println("Test instance called. this.hashCode:" 
    + this.hashCode());
        System.out.println("Given parameter hashCode:" + t.hashCode());
        return t;
    }

    public final TestObject testInstance(TestObject t, TestObject t2){
        return t;
    }

    public static final TestObject testStatic(TestObject t, TestObject t2){
        return t;
    }
}

Which will output:

 1418481495  
 303563356  
 Test instance called. this.hashCode:1418481495
 Given parameter hashCode:303563356

Ok so JVM is smart enough to call param1.testInstance(param2). Can we use testInstance from another resource but not TestObject, i.e.:

public class TestUtil {

    public final TestObject testInstance(TestObject t){
        return t;
    }
}

And call:

BinaryOperator<TestObject> binary = TestUtil::testInstance;

It will just not compile and compiler will tell: "The type TestUtil does not define testInstance(TestObject, TestObject)". So compiler will look for a static reference if it is not the same type. Ok what about polymorphism? If we remove final modifiers and add our SubTestObject class:

public class SubTestObject extends TestObject {

    public final TestObject testInstance(TestObject t){
        return t;
    }

}

And call:

BinaryOperator<TestObject> binary = SubTestObject::testInstance;

It will not compile as well, compiler will still look for static reference. But below code will compile fine since it is passing is-a test:

public class TestObject {

    public SubTestObject testInstance(Object t){
        return (SubTestObject) t;
    }

}

BinaryOperator<TestObject> binary = TestObject::testInstance;

*I am just studying so I have figured out by try and see, feel free to correct me if I am wrong

I found this source very interesting.

In fact, it is the Lambda that turns into a Double Colon. The Double Colon is more readable. We follow those steps:

STEP1:

// We create a comparator of two persons
Comparator c = (Person p1, Person p2) -> p1.getAge().compareTo(p2.getAge());

STEP2:

// We use the interference
Comparator c = (p1, p2) -> p1.getAge().compareTo(p2.getAge());

STEP3:

// The magic
Comparator c = Comparator.comparing(Person::getAge());
  • 3
    Seems like Person::getAge() should be Person::getAge. – Qwertiy Sep 6 '17 at 11:40

In older Java versions, instead of "::" or lambd, you can use:

public interface Action {
    void execute();
}

public class ActionImpl implements Action {

    @Override
    public void execute() {
        System.out.println("execute with ActionImpl");
    }

}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Action action = new Action() {
        @Override
        public void execute() {
            System.out.println("execute with anonymous class");
        }
    };
    action.execute();

    //or

    Action actionImpl = new ActionImpl();
    actionImpl.execute();
}

Or passing to the method:

public static void doSomething(Action action) {
    action.execute();
}

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