28

I just had a look at the source code of the Skip/Take extension methods of the .NET Framework (on the IEnumerable<T> type) and found that the internal implementation is working with the GetEnumerator method:

// .NET framework
    public static IEnumerable<TSource> Skip<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, int count)  
    {
        if (source == null) throw Error.ArgumentNull("source"); 
        return SkipIterator<TSource>(source, count); 
    }

    static IEnumerable<TSource> SkipIterator<TSource>(IEnumerable<TSource> source, int count) 
    {
        using (IEnumerator<TSource> e = source.GetEnumerator()) 
        {
            while (count > 0 && e.MoveNext()) count--;
            if (count <= 0) 
            { 
                while (e.MoveNext()) yield return e.Current;
            } 
        } 
    }

Suppose that I have an IEnumerable<T> with 1000 elements (underlying type is List<T>). What happens if I'm doing list.Skip(990).Take(10) ? Will it iterate througt the 990 first elements before taking the last ten? (this is how I understand it). If yes, then I don't understand why Microsoft didn't implement the Skip method like this:

    // Not tested... just to show the idea
    public static IEnumerable<T> Skip<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int count)
    {
        if (source is IList<T>)
        {
            IList<T> list = (IList<T>)source;
            for (int i = count; i < list.Count; i++)
            {
                yield return list[i];
            }
        }
        else if (source is IList)
        {
            IList list = (IList)source;
            for (int i = count; i < list.Count; i++)
            {
                yield return (T)list[i];
            }
        }
        else
        {
            // .NET framework
            using (IEnumerator<T> e = source.GetEnumerator())
            {
                while (count > 0 && e.MoveNext()) count--;
                if (count <= 0)
                {
                    while (e.MoveNext()) yield return e.Current;
                }
            }
        }
    }

In fact, they did that for the Count method for example...

    // .NET Framework...
    public static int Count<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source) 
    {
        if (source == null) throw Error.ArgumentNull("source");

        ICollection<TSource> collectionoft = source as ICollection<TSource>; 
        if (collectionoft != null) return collectionoft.Count;

        ICollection collection = source as ICollection; 
        if (collection != null) return collection.Count; 

        int count = 0;
        using (IEnumerator<TSource> e = source.GetEnumerator())
        { 
            checked 
            {
                while (e.MoveNext()) count++;
            }
        } 
        return count;
    } 

So what's the reason?

4
  • 2
    I have found that it's always best to assume those methods are never optimized. Even for Count(), it optimizes for ICollection<>, but not IReadOnlyCollection<>. If you need it to be optimized, write your own.
    – RobSiklos
    Commented Nov 15, 2013 at 14:19
  • Because they never bothered to add that optimization? I don't see any problems with you doing that yourself if you find that it helps. But note that then myList.Select(..).Skip(100) is slower than myList.Skip(100).Select(..), even though they're functionally the same.
    – Tim S.
    Commented Nov 15, 2013 at 14:27
  • Also note that in Linq-To-SQL and EF Skip and Take are pushed down to the SQL query, so it does not iterate through the prior items. (SQL might via a table/index scan, but Linq does not)
    – D Stanley
    Commented Nov 15, 2013 at 14:43
  • In this case, you call the Skip/Take method on IQueryable<T> (and not IEnumerable<T>), which has a different implementation...
    – nicolas
    Commented Nov 15, 2013 at 14:45

3 Answers 3

17

In Jon Skeet's excellent tutorial re-implementing Linq, he discusses (briefly) that very question:

Although most of these operations can't be sensibly optimized, it would make sense to optimize Skip when the source implements IList. We can skip the skipping, so to speak, and go straight to the appropriate index. This wouldn't spot the case where the source was modified between iterations, which may be one reason it's not implemented in the framework as far as I'm aware.

That seems like a reasonable reason to hold off on that optimization, but I agree that for specific cases, it may be worthwhile to make that optimization if you can guarantee your source can't/won't be modified.

5
  • Ok, I see the point... but they could have used IReadOnlyList<T> in this case... I guess this interface is just not enough used (and thus the cost of testing if IEnumerable<T> is IReadOnlyList<T> is too high) ?
    – nicolas
    Commented Nov 15, 2013 at 17:17
  • @Bidou, that's what I'd guess too. For an all-encompassing Skip() implementation, checking for that little-used interface might have been deemed not worth it. Commented Nov 15, 2013 at 17:43
  • 3
    For functional purposes, IList is basically a cached collection. Modifying an IList between enumerator iterations generally raises exceptions anyways, so I don't see why the optimization should not be made. In fact, if you accept the possibility of random parallel side-effects modifying the list, your results will be random no matter if you directly skip or not.
    – glopes
    Commented Sep 7, 2014 at 15:38
  • 2
    I had a task to optimize some code that takes hours/days to complete execution. When I run Visual Studio Profiler I found few places to optimize, but profiler didn't reveal Skip/Take performance issue. When I switched to indexes and removed Skip/Take I boosted performance up to 1700 times: code was executed ~9.5 hours, now it worked for 20 seconds only, so don't use Skip/Take for IList if you need good performance.
    – Alezis
    Commented Jul 21, 2016 at 11:49
  • 1
    New home for Jon Skeet's blog post: codeblog.jonskeet.uk/2011/01/02/…
    – Pinski
    Commented Sep 11, 2017 at 22:47
3

As ledbutter mentioned, when Jon Skeet reimplemented LINQ, he mentioned that an optimization like your Skip "wouldn't spot the case where the source was modified between iterations". You can change your code to the following to make it check for that case. It does so by calling MoveNext() on the collection's enumerator, even though it doesn't use e.Current, so that the method will throw if the collection changes.

Granted, this removes a significant part of the optimization: that the enumerator needs to be created, partially stepped through, and disposed, but it still has the benefit that you don't need to pointlessly step through the first count objects. And it might be confusing that you have an e.Current that is not useful, since it points to list[i - count] instead of list[i].

public static IEnumerable<T> Skip<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int count)
{
    using (IEnumerator<T> e = source.GetEnumerator())
    {
        if (source is IList<T>)
        {
            IList<T> list = (IList<T>)source;
            for (int i = count; i < list.Count; i++)
            {
                e.MoveNext();
                yield return list[i];
            }
        }
        else if (source is IList)
        {
            IList list = (IList)source;
            for (int i = count; i < list.Count; i++)
            {
                e.MoveNext();
                yield return (T)list[i];
            }
        }
        else
        {
            // .NET framework
            while (count > 0 && e.MoveNext()) count--;
            if (count <= 0)
            {
                while (e.MoveNext()) yield return e.Current;
            }
        }
    }
}
0

I assume that they wanted to throw InvalidOperationException "Collection was modified..." when the underlying collection is modified meanwhile in another thread. Your version doesn't do that. It will yield terrible results.

That is the standard practice MSFT is following throughout .Net framework in all Collections which is not thread safe(some are exceptional though).

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