34

As for now we have a project structure with single source folder named src, which contains source code for three modules. What I want to do is:

1) Compile source code. This is easily done with sourceSets definition:

sourceSets {
    main {
        java {
            srcDir 'src'
        }
    }
}

2) Put compilation results into three jars. I am doing this via three 'jar' type tasks:

I am doing this now via three separate tasks:

  • util.jar

    task utilJar(type: Jar) {
        from(sourceSets.main.output) {
            include "my/util/package/**"
        }
    }
    
  • client.jar

    task clientJar(type: Jar) {
        from(sourceSets.main.output) {
            include "my/client/package/**"
        }
    }
    
  • server.jar

    task serverJar(type: Jar) {
        from(sourceSets.main.output) {
            include "**"
        }
        excludes.addAll(utilJar.includes)
        excludes.addAll(clientJar.includes)
    }
    

The thing is that server.jar should contain all classes that are not contained within client.jar and util.jar. In ant build script we solve this problem by using difference ant task. How this can be done in gradle (my current approach doesn't work)?

Maybe my approach is completely wrong. Please advice.

P.S. as for now we CAN NOT change the project source code folder structure.

30

I will post my working solution here as an answer (I've got a hint on gradle's forum).

The scopes in gradle are very strange thing :) I thought that every task definition creates an object of some 'Task' class, which is something like 'JarTask' in this particular case. Then I can access any property of the class from anywhere in my build.gradle script. However, I found the only place where I can see the patterns, which are included in jar file - inside a from block of a task. So my working solution for now is to:

1) Define a project-level collection to contain patterns to be excluded from server.jar

2) Exclude all patterns in from block of serverJar task.

Please see final version below

sourceSets {  
    main {  
        java {  
            srcDir 'src'  
        }  
    }  
} 

// holds classes included into client.jar and util.jar, so they are to be excluded from server.jar
ext.serverExcludes = []

// util.jar
task utilJar(type: Jar) {  
    from(sourceSets.main.output) {  
        include "my/util/package/**" 
        project.ext.serverExcludes.addAll(includes)
    }  
}

// client.jar
task clientJar(type: Jar) {  
    from(sourceSets.main.output) {  
        include "my/client/package/**"
        project.ext.serverExcludes.addAll(includes)
    }  
}

// server.jar
task serverJar(type: Jar) {  
    from(sourceSets.main.output) {  
        exclude project.ext.serverExcludes
    }  
}
  • This is great, but how do you refer to the separate .jar files from other projects - e.g. how could you pull in client.jar into another subproject? – z0r May 24 '16 at 13:33
  • @z0r we are simply publishing artifacts to the repository and then using them as dependencies in subprojects. P.S. sorry for the delay in response. – vitalidze Jan 26 '17 at 11:23
23

I think the approach is wrong. I recommend making a project with 3 sub projects.

project
- util
- server (depends on util)
- client (depends on util)

If for some reason you cannot change the class structure use this kind of build files:

settings.gradle

include 'util', 'client', 'server'

build.gradle

subprojects {
    apply plugin: 'java'
}

project(':util') {
    sourceSets {
        main {
            java {
                srcDir '../src'
                include 'util/**'
            }
        }
    }
}

project(':server') {
    sourceSets {
        main {
            java {
                srcDir '../src'
                include 'server/**'
            }
        }
    }
    dependencies {
        compile project(':util')
    }
}

project(':client') {
    sourceSets {
        main {
            java {
                srcDir '../src'
                include 'client/**'
            }
        }
    }
    dependencies {
        compile project(':util')
    }
}

You still need directories for subprojects but the sources are in one place as you wanted.

When you run gradle assemble you will have 3 jars with separate set of classes. The advantage of this solution is that we make a proper Gradle multi module project with correct dependencies, not just tasks for building jars.

Please read Multi-Project Builds.

  • Thanks for your comment. I've thought about such approach, but it is very desirable to not change the directory structure at all. The main reason is that we have lots of SVN branches (more than fifty) and it should be a real pain to merge them after directory structure changes (you know, tree conflicts). Another reason is that util and client depend on each other, so I guess they should be in a separate module, which brings same problem. I know that this is a mess in our source code structure design, but I believe gradle can do everything that ant can :) – vitalidze Nov 16 '13 at 7:07
  • 1
    @vitalidze The solution I proposed is not changing directory structure. Are additional empty directories a problem? Do you have dependency cycles? – Grzegorz Żur Nov 16 '13 at 8:08
  • The thing is that classes are not separated by folders (i.e. client, server, util). For example, I include into client jar 'a/b' and 'z/x/y', util includes 'q/w/e', and server should include all rest classes, which may be under 'a', 'z', 'z/x', 'q', 'q/w'. – vitalidze Nov 16 '13 at 10:03
  • @vitalidze You can still do a lot using the include and exclude patterns. See gradle.org/docs/current/javadoc/org/gradle/api/tasks/util/… – Grzegorz Żur Nov 16 '13 at 13:02
  • 1
    If you're using Gradle >= 3, the compile configuration has been deprecated in favor or implementation. See Migrate to Android Plugin for Gradle 3.0.0. – bejado May 10 '18 at 22:32
4

We have the same problem at my company, ie. legacy code that is difficult to migrate into a "good" project structure, and the need to build several jars from the same codebase. We decided to define different sourceSets and build each of the sourceSets using standard Gradle.

We then use iterators to add jar- and javadoc-tasks for each sourceSet:

sourceSets.all { SourceSet sourceSet ->
    Task jarTask = tasks.create("jar" + sourceSet.name, Jar.class)
    jarTask.from(sourceSet.output)
    // Configure other jar task properties: group, description, manifest etc

    Task javadocTask = tasks.create("javadoc" + sourceSet.name, Javadoc.class)
    javadocTask.setClasspath(sourceSet.output + sourceSet.compileClasspath)
    javadocTask.setSource(sourceSet.allJava)
    // Extra config for the javadoc task: group, description etc

    Task javadocJarTask = tasks.create("javadocJar" + sourceSet.name, Jar.class)
    javadocJarTask.setClassifier("javadoc") // adds "-javadoc" to the name of the jar
    javadocJarTask.from(javadocTask.outputs)
    // Add extra config: group, description, manifest etc
}
2

I agree in principal with the accepted answer too. I found a project where the client requires two JAR essentially of the same file except the Manifest is different only by the Class-Path key.

jar {
    manifest {
        attributes(
                "Main-Class": platformMainClass,
                "Implementation-Title": platformDisplayName,
                "Implementation-Description": platformDescription,
                "Platform-Version": platformVersion,
                "Implementation-Version": version,
                "Build-Assembly-User": System.getProperty("user.name"),
                "Build-Assembly-Date": new java.util.Date().toString(),
                "Class-Path": configurations.compile.collect { "lib/"+it.getName() }.join(' ')
        )
    }

    duplicatesStrategy = DuplicatesStrategy.EXCLUDE

    exclude( [ 'log4j*.properties', 'uk/gov/acme/secret/product/server/**' ])
}

The same manifest and the source code then is:

task applicationClientJar(type: Jar, description: "Creates the Application  Client JAR file.") {
    dependsOn compileJava
    manifest {
        attributes(
                "Main-Class": platformMainClass,
                "Implementation-Title": platformDisplayName,
                "Implementation-Description": platformDescription,
                "Platform-Version": platformVersion,
                "Implementation-Version": version,
                "Assembly-Date": new java.util.Date().toString()
        )
    }
    archiveName = "acme-client-${platformVersion}.jar"
    destinationDir = file("${buildDir}/libs")
    from sourceSets.main.output

    duplicatesStrategy = DuplicatesStrategy.EXCLUDE

    exclude( [ 'log4j*.properties', 'uk/gov/acme/secret/product/server/**'     }

So Grzegorz notation is correct, because the Gradle should know there are two different JAR with GAVs. Multi-module is the preferred option.

compile "uk.gov.acme.secret:acme:1.0"  // CORE
compile "uk.gov.acme.secret:acme-client:1.0"

The only way to configure for this is to use the Multi-Module Gradle project and then add a compile and/or deploy dependency to the core / main project.

project(':common:acme-micro-service-webapp') {
    dependencies {
        compile project(':common:acme-core')
    }
}

Inside the 'acme-micro-service-webapp' project, this ensures that the dependent 'common:acme-core' is compiled first.

PS: I am still trying to figure out a better solution.

PS PS: If you are using Maven as well as, it may be possible to hook on the `install' task.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.