164

Is there any way to determine if a process (script) runs inside an lxc container (~ Docker runtime)? I know that some programs are able to detect whether they run inside a virtual machine, is something similar available for lxc/docker?

  • It might seem pedantic, but it would be best to rephrase your question to describe a problem you're having and ask how to solve it -- without that, the question stands a higher chance of being closed. In many cases it's difficult to make that change but in yours it wouldn't be hard to simply rephrase if you wish. – mah Nov 15 '13 at 21:04
  • there is an interesting response when issuing this command while inside a container : uptime – Scott Stensland Feb 19 '17 at 1:16

14 Answers 14

165

The most reliable way is to check /proc/1/cgroup. It will tell you the control groups of the init process, and when you are not in a container, that will be / for all hierarchies. When you are inside a container, you will see the name of the anchor point. With LXC/Docker containers, it will be something like /lxc/<containerid> or /docker/<containerid> respectively.

  • 12
    docker now uses docker instead of lxc in those paths – Andy Nov 21 '15 at 16:29
  • 4
    Does not work for lxd/lxc containers, but stackoverflow.com/a/20010626/170230 does. – Draco Ater Jun 8 '16 at 6:39
  • With later versions of systemd it looks like you can't rely on process 1 using / for all cgroups; on my Debian 9 system (systemd 232) only three of the ten cgroups (3:cpuset, 4:perf_event and 7:freezer) are at root; the rest are under /init.scope. That said, I think that searching that file for :/docker/ is probably the most reliable heuristic at the moment. – cjs Feb 28 '18 at 7:40
  • 2
    grep 'docker\|lxc' /proc/1/cgroup works for me on Docker 18.09. – rypel Feb 1 '19 at 11:04
  • Here's a tighter (extended) regex that assumes a sha256 hash in the basename position: grep -Eq '/(lxc|docker)/[[:xdigit:]]{64}' /proc/1/cgroup – rubicks Jun 14 '19 at 14:40
156

Docker creates a .dockerenv file at the root of the directory tree inside container. You can run this script to verify

#!/bin/bash
if [ -f /.dockerenv ]; then
    echo "I'm inside matrix ;(";
else
    echo "I'm living in real world!";
fi


MORE: Ubuntu actually has a bash script: /bin/running-in-container and it actually can return the type of container it has been invoked in. Might be helpful. Don't know about other major distros though.

  • 13
    Important note: the .dockerinit file has been removed in recent versions of Docker, so this method won't work any more. As of this writing, the .dockerenv file is still kept around, so perhaps that could be used instead. – Jason R Apr 27 '16 at 1:10
  • On Debian /bin/running-in-container is provided by upstart. With the transition to systemd it might go away. I hope not - it sounds useful! – Max Murphy Sep 1 '16 at 9:12
  • "on top of directory tree", what does that mean? where is that? – Alexander Mills Dec 20 '16 at 10:18
  • 2
    Others have pointed out that checking .dockerenv is not recommended – Dave Sep 25 '18 at 10:53
  • For me .dockerenv is more like edge of the world from "13th floor". – okutane Oct 15 '18 at 10:36
20

On a new ubuntu 16.04 system, new systemd & lxc 2.0

sudo grep -qa container=lxc /proc/1/environ
15

A concise way to check for docker in a bash script is:

#!/bin/bash
if grep docker /proc/1/cgroup -qa; then
   echo I'm running on docker.
fi
13

Handy Python function to check if running in Docker:

def in_docker():
    """ Returns: True if running in a Docker container, else False """
    with open('/proc/1/cgroup', 'rt') as ifh:
        return 'docker' in ifh.read()
  • 2
    Important Note! This does not appear to work when the container is running in kubernetes. Instead, replace the last line with 'kubepod' in place of 'docker'. (Or, put in an "or" statement that checks for both ;)) – JJC Jan 13 '19 at 3:20
  • 1
    It's kubepods I guess. – rookie099 Aug 29 '19 at 7:53
9

We use the proc's sched (/proc/$PID/sched) to extract the PID of the process. The process's PID inside the container will differ then it's PID on the host (a non-container system).

For example, the output of /proc/1/sched on a container will return:

root@33044d65037c:~# cat /proc/1/sched | head -n 1
bash (5276, #threads: 1)

While on a non-container host:

$ cat /proc/1/sched  | head -n 1
init (1, #threads: 1)

This helps to differentiate if you are in a container or not.

  • Depending on the OS, "init" might need to be replaced by "systemd". More information on systemd here. – BrianV Jun 23 '17 at 1:50
  • Yes, but the point wasn't the name of the init process, the point was the process number. – MillerGeek May 2 '18 at 14:31
  • This seems to only work on Docker. In an LXC container It's returning Systemd PID 1 – MillerGeek May 2 '18 at 14:32
5

The easiest way would be to check the environment. If you have the container=lxc variable, you are within a container.

Otherwise, if you are root, you can try to perform mknod or mount operation, if it fails, you are most likely in a container with dropped capabilities.

  • This one works not only for docker (I didn't check that), but more importantly for lxd/lxc containers (checked), where /proc/1/cgroup does not allow you to detect that. – Draco Ater Jun 8 '16 at 6:37
  • 2
    can you edit the answer with code instead of pseudocode? "container=lxc" ?is not proper anything. do you mean something like if [[ "lxc" = "$container" ]] ? – Alexander Mills Dec 20 '16 at 10:20
  • 3
    I mean...it is weird, usually env variables are in all caps, so looking for some precision here – Alexander Mills Dec 20 '16 at 10:22
  • 3
    docker run alpine env does not give anything that looks like that variable – Archimedes Trajano Mar 10 '19 at 16:01
4

Check for all the solutions above in Python:

import os
import subprocess

def in_container():
    # type: () -> bool
    """ Determines if we're running in an lxc/docker container. """
    out = subprocess.check_output('cat /proc/1/sched', shell=True)
    out = out.decode('utf-8').lower()
    checks = [
        'docker' in out,
        '/lxc/' in out,
        out.split()[0] not in ('systemd', 'init',),
        os.path.exists('/.dockerenv'),
        os.path.exists('/.dockerinit'),
        os.getenv('container', None) is not None
    ]
    return any(checks)
  • This didn't work for me on Mac based docker container. Returns empty. Docker version 2.1.0.1 (37199). – splintercell Nov 26 '19 at 18:01
  • This one did: def is_non_docker(): return os.path.exists('/proc/1/cgroup') as per the accepted answer here stackoverflow.com/questions/20010199/… – splintercell Nov 26 '19 at 18:08
3

My answer only applies for Node.js processes but may be relevant for some visitors who stumble to this question looking for a Node.js specific answer.

I had the same problem and relying on /proc/self/cgroup I created an npm package for solely this purpose — to detect whether a Node.js process runs inside a Docker container or not.

The containerized npm module will help you out in Node.js. It is not currently tested in Io.js but may just as well work there too.

  • Thanks for this module, seems to be a couple of open fixes pending - are you still maintaining this? – stevokk Aug 2 '18 at 8:51
2

Docker is evolving day by day, so we can't say for sure if they are going to keep .dockerenv .dockerinit in the future.

In most of the Linux flavours init is the first process to start. But in case of containers this is not true.

#!/bin/bash
if ps -p1|grep -q init;then  
  echo "non-docker" 
else 
  echo "docker" 
fi
  • 6
    @RomanTrofimov LXC/Docker doesn't either. What a funny comment. – abourget Mar 3 '17 at 17:41
  • 1
    It does not work in centos 7 as well. When I run in my host machine it says docker. Looks like systemd is running as process id 1 – Venkateswara Rao Jan 26 '18 at 5:02
  • @VenkateswaraRao - This must be run inside the container. The intent is to find out if you are inside a docker container or not. – Govind Kailas Jan 30 '18 at 4:43
  • 1
    @GovindKailas: The problem is that this assumes that the normal PID one is init, which is not true on systemd or launchd based systems... – Gert van den Berg Feb 16 '18 at 14:24
  • 3
    @SamThomas: launchd, upstart, Solaris SMF, systemd, Sys V style init, BSD style init (these two and some others might call their PID 1 init though), OpenRC, initng, runit. See here. Most modern Linux-based systems would use systemd, some older ones, upstart.... All modern OS X systems would use launchd – Gert van den Berg May 23 '18 at 8:16
1

I have translated JJC's answer into ruby

def in_docker
  File.open('/proc/1/cgroup', 'rt') do |f|
    contents = f.read
    return contents =~ /docker/i || contents =~ /kubepod/i
  end
rescue StandardError => e
  p 'Local development'
  p e
  false
end
0

This SO Q&A: "Find out if the OS is running in a virtual environment"; though not the same as the OP's question, it does indeed answer common cases of finding which container you're in (if at all).

In particular, install and read the code of this bash script which seems to work pretty well:

virt-what :

sudo apt install virt-what
  • Doesn't work with virt-what version 1.14-1 on Ubuntu 16.04. Needs patch. – Lucas Jan 4 '18 at 22:23
0

Building on the accepted answer that tests /proc/*/cgroup and requiring only awk in the container.

awk -F: '/cpu/ && $3 ~ /^\/$/ {c=1} END{ exit c }' /proc/self/cgroup

So for use in a script or so, a test could be constructed this way.

is_running_in_container() {
  awk -F: '/cpu/ && $3 ~ /^\/$/{ c=1 } END { exit c }' /proc/self/cgroup
}

if is_running_in_container; then
  echo "Aye!! I'm in a container"
else 
  echo "Nay!! I'm not in a container"
fi
  • Returns 1 on both. – sorin Feb 1 at 14:37
  • @sorin - The same Sorin from XenServer? :)) Just tested again on a debian host and it seems like rdma on linux >= 5.0 has broken the /proc/*/cgroup test. I've updated to make the test more stringent. – shalomb Feb 2 at 22:24
-4

Maybe this do the trick:

if [ -z $(docker ps -q) ]; then
    echo "There is not process currently running"
else
    echo "There are processes running"
fi
  • 1
    No docker binary is available from inside of container, obviously. – toriningen Jul 5 '18 at 17:02
  • 3
    Umm, this would fail in situations (e.g. gitlab docker-in-docker) where the controlling container has docker and access to the hosts' docker socket. – shalomb Jul 15 '18 at 21:02

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.