1

My goal is to compute the PMI of the text below: a= 'When the defendant and his lawyer walked into the court, some of the victim supporters turned their backs on him'

formula: PMI-IR (w1, w2) = log2 p(w1&w2)/p(w1)*p(w2); p=probability, w=word 

My attempt:
>>> from nltk import bigrams
>>> import collections
>>> a1=a.split()    
>>> a2=collections.Counter(a1)
>>> a3=collections.Counter(bigrams(a1))
>>> a4=sum([a2[x]for x in a2])
>>> a5=sum([a3[x]for x in a3])
>>> a6={x:float(a2[x])/a4 for x in a2} # word probabilities(w1 and w2)
>>> a7={x:float(a3[x])/a5 for x in a3} # joint probabilites (w1&w2)
>>> for x in a6:
    k={x:round(log(a7[b]/(a6[x] * a6[y]),2),4) for b in a7 for y in a6 if x and y in b}
    u.append(k)
>>> u
[{'and': 4.3959}, {'on': 4.3959}, {'his': 4.3959}, {'When': 4.3959}.....}]

The result I got doesn't seem right due to the following (1)I wanted one large dictionary and got many little ones for each item.(2) The probabilities may not have been fitted into the equation correctly as this is my first attempt at this problem.

Any suggestion? Thanks.

3

I am not an NLP expert, but your equation looks fine. The implementation has a subtle bug. Consider the below precedence deep dive:

"""Precendence deep dive"""
'hi' and True #returns true regardless of what the contents of the string
'hi' and False #returns false
b = ('hi','bob')
'hi' and 'bob' in b #returns true BUT not because 'hi' is in b!!!
'hia' and 'bob' in b #returns true as the precedence is 'hia' and ('bob' in b)
result2 = 'bob' in b
'hia' and result2 #returns true and shows the precedence more clearly
'hi' and 'boba' in b #returns false  

#each string needs to check in b
'hi' in b and 'bob' in b #return true!!
'hia' in b and 'bob' in b #return false!!
'hi' in b and 'boba' in b #return false!! - same as before but now each string is checked separately

Notice the difference in the joint probabilities u and v. u contains the wrong precedence and v contains the right precedence

from nltk import bigrams
import collections

a= """When the defendant and his lawyer walked into the court, some of the victim supporters turned their backs on him.  if we have more data then it will be more interesting because we have more chance to repeat bigrams. After some of the victim supporters turned their backs then a subset of the victim supporters turned around and left the court."""

a1=a.split() 
a2=collections.Counter(a1)

a3=collections.Counter(bigrams(a1))
a4=sum([a2[x]for x in a2])
a5=sum([a3[x]for x in a3])
a6={x:float(a2[x])/a4 for x in a2} # word probabilities(w1 and w2)
a7={x:float(a3[x])/a5 for x in a3} # joint probabilites (w1&w2)
u = {}
v = {}
for x in a6:
  k={x:round(math.log((a7[b]/(a6[x] * a6[y])),2),4) for b in a7 for y in a6 if x and y in b}
  u[x] = k[x]
  k={x:round(math.log((a7[b]/(a6[x] * a6[y])),2),4) for b in a7 for y in a6 if x in b and y in b}
  v[x] = k[x]

u['the']
v['the']
  • Thanks for responding to the question. It appears your solution did not really address the question I asked, and that's not the right way of coding log2 in python. the log function carries at least one argument in parenthesis. Thanks anyway, I'm still waiting for the right solution. – Tiger1 Nov 20 '13 at 14:10
  • My apologies, I learn something new every day. My log function was pointing to the numpy version!! I stand corrected. However, in the code you provide it looks like you do not initialize u. I am sure you did that above your code. In which case let me address your two questions again. 1) I have updated the code to flatten the dictionary and to the use math.log explicitly (this was for myself, you don't need it really). 2) Your probabilities may be correct, but they are obviously for single words and not bigrams. – Paul Nov 20 '13 at 16:33
  • Hi Paul, the joint probabilities are for bigrams. you can check it by manually creating bigrams and running the code if you don't have nltk. – Tiger1 Nov 20 '13 at 17:07
  • Hi Paul,you still haven't answered the question. I would like to have all the items in just one dictionary, not each item per dictionary. – Tiger1 Nov 20 '13 at 17:12
  • Please ignore my last comment. you have actually addressed one of the questions (the dictionary part). – Tiger1 Nov 20 '13 at 17:19

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