7

Raw SQL desired:

SELECT
    id
FROM
   (SELECT some_table.id FROM some_table WHERE some_table.some_field IS NULL) AS subq1
   UNION
   (SELECT some_table.id WHERE some_table.some_field IS NOT NULL)
LIMIT 10;

Here is the python code:

import sqlalchemy

SOME_TABLE = sqlalchemy.Table(
 'some_table',
 sqlalchemy.MetaData(),
 sqlalchemy.Column('id', sqlalchemy.Integer, primary_key=True),
 sqlalchemy.Column('some_field', sqlalchemy.Text))

stmt_1 = sqlalchemy.sql.select(SOME_TABLE.columns).where(SOME_TABLE.columns.some_field != None)
stmt_2 = sqlalchemy.sql.select(SOME_TABLE.columns).where(SOME_TABLE.columns.some_field == None)

# This gets a programming error.
stmt_1.union(stmt_2).limit(10);

Here is the outputted SQL (with parameters swapped in) that gets this error: ERROR: syntax error at or near "UNION":

SELECT some_table.id, some_table.some_field
FROM some_table
WHERE some_table.some_field IS NOT NULL
 LIMIT 10 UNION SELECT some_table.id, some_table.some_field
FROM some_table
WHERE some_table.some_field IS NULL
 LIMIT 10
 LIMIT 10

How can I alias the subqueries?

11

i used a little bit different approach:

# the first subquery, select all ids from SOME_TABLE where some_field is not NULL
s1 = select([SOME_TABLE.c.id]).where(SOME_TABLE.c.some_field != None)

# the second subquery, select all ids from SOME_TABLE where some_field is NULL
s2 = select([SOME_TABLE.c.id]).where(SOME_TABLE.c.some_field != None)

# union s1 and s2 subqueries together and alias the result as "alias_name"
q = s1.union(s2).alias('alias_name')

# run the query and limit the aliased result to 10
session.query(q).limit(10)

Here is the produced sql:

SELECT alias_name.id AS alias_name_id 
FROM (SELECT some_table.id AS id 
FROM some_table 
WHERE some_table.some_field IS NOT NULL UNION SELECT some_table.id AS id 
FROM some_table 
WHERE some_table.some_field IS NULL) AS alias_name 
LIMIT 10

I think this is the result you wanted.

  • In another question I asked if it's possible to perform the union without using a subquery: stackoverflow.com/q/36876121/565879 – Buttons840 Apr 26 '16 at 21:38
  • 2
    If you have more than two sub-queries that you want to union, you can use union(s1, s2, s3, ...). – tsauerwein May 24 '16 at 15:52
  • 1
    != None should be is not None – Matthew Moisen Feb 27 '17 at 19:37
  • 1
    @MatthewMoisen, That is absolutely wrong. some_field != None will produce IS NOT NULL, however, is not None will just return the boolean value True because the is keyword/operator cannot be overloaded like != can. The SQLAlchemy docs specifically state that if you don't like fighting your linters for this very reason, to use .isnot() instead. – OozeMeister Feb 7 at 23:31

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