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I changed the lifecycle for a bunch of my buckets on Amazon S3 so their storage class was set to Glacier. I did this using the online AWS Console. I now need those files again.

I know how to restore them back to S3 per file. But my buckets have thousands of files. I wanted to see if there was a way to restore the entire bucket back to S3, just like there was a way to send the entire bucket to Glacier?

I'm guessing there's a way to program a solution. But I wanted to see if there was a way to do it in the Console. Or with another program? Or something else I might be missing?

10 Answers 10

13
0

There isn't a built-in tool for this. "Folders" in S3 are an illusion for human convenience, based on forward-slashes in the object key (path/filename) and every object that migrates to glacier has to be restored individually, although...

Of course you could write a script to iterate through the hierarchy and send those restore requests using the SDKs or the REST API in your programming language of choice.

Be sure you understand how restoring from glacier into S3 works, before you proceed. It is always only a temporary restoration, and you choose the number of days that each object will persist in S3 before reverting back to being only stored in glacier.

Also, you want to be certain that you understand the penalty charges for restoring too much glacier data in a short period of time, or you could be in for some unexpected expense. Depending on the urgency, you may want to spread the restore operation out over days or weeks.

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  • 2
    Thank you for the comment to pay attention to cost - almost made a drastic mistake there. – tom stratton Apr 12 '14 at 4:01
  • While this approach works, if you have a directory structure with hundreds of thousands of files (archives) it could take days to send all those REST API requests. – zyamys Apr 3 '17 at 16:36
  • @zyamys the operation can be optimized by using parallel processes, threads, or multiple concurrent requests in a non-blocking environment... and, of course, running the code in EC2 in the same region will minimize the round trip time compared to running it externally. S3 should easily handle 100 req/sec, and more of you process the keys not in lexical order, since that reduces the chance of hitting index hot spots. – Michael - sqlbot Apr 3 '17 at 17:19
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    AWS have revised Glacier restoration charges; now it's a simple per-Gigabyte restore cost (with three tiers based on urgency or lack thereof). – Calrion Mar 27 '18 at 7:44
63
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If you use s3cmd you can use it to restore recursively pretty easily:

s3cmd restore --recursive s3://mybucketname/ 

I've also used it to restore just folders as well:

s3cmd restore --recursive s3://mybucketname/folder/
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  • 3
    For MacOS X users simply download s3cmd, unzip, and run "sudo python setup.py install". To include your IAM (AWS) key in the command, run ... s3cmd restore --recursive --access_key={your access key here} --secret_key={your secret key here} s3://ms4pro/ – Vyke Jun 25 '15 at 20:29
  • what version of s3cmd does have restore option? – JrBenito Jul 29 '16 at 1:40
  • 4
    -D NUM, --restore-days=NUM Number of days to keep restored file available (only for 'restore' command). – sajal Aug 21 '17 at 11:41
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    You can also specify archive retrieval options (expedited, standard, bulk) to the 'restore' command by adding --restore-priority=bulk, as per described here. – bjmarra Apr 30 '18 at 22:08
  • Is there a way for this to show progress or status? – bthoppae Mar 7 '19 at 20:14
37
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If you're using the AWS CLI tool (it's nice, you should), you can do it like this:

aws s3 ls s3://<bucket_name> | awk '{print $4}' | xargs -L 1 aws s3api restore-object --restore-request Days=<days> --bucket <bucket_name> --key

Replace <bucket_name> with the bucket name you want.

Replace <days> with the number of days you want to restore the object for.

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  • 1
    Thanks for this answer. I will add that this solution only works if the keys do not have spaces in them! In order to handle spaces you would need to replace your awk command with awk '{print substr($0, index($0, $4))}' Thanks to stackoverflow.com/questions/13446255/… – tom stratton Apr 12 '14 at 3:54
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    AND you need to use xargs -I %%% -L 1 aws s3api restore-object --restore-request Days=<days> --bucket <bucket_name> --key "%%%" so that you quote the string containing the spaces as part of the restore command. – tom stratton Apr 12 '14 at 4:34
  • You can use --recursive flag in aws s3 ls command to restore the whole folder recursively. – Egor Nepomnyaschih Dec 21 '18 at 9:45
  • @tomstratton Flag -L 1 excludes the usage of -I %%%. It should be removed. Unrelated: -t flag may come in handy to track the progress. – Egor Nepomnyaschih Dec 21 '18 at 11:27
16
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The above answers didn't work well for me because my bucket was mixed with objects on Glacier and some that were not. The easiest thing for me was to create a list of all GLACIER objects in the bucket, then attempt to restore each one individually, ignoring any errors (like already in progress, not an object, etc).

  1. Get a listing of all GLACIER files (keys) in the bucket

    aws s3api list-objects-v2 --bucket <bucketName> --query "Contents[?StorageClass=='GLACIER']" --output text | awk '{print $2}' > glacier-restore.txt

  2. Create a shell script and run it, replacing your "bucketName".

    #!/bin/sh
    
    for x in `cat glacier-restore.txt`
      do
        echo "Begin restoring $x"
        aws s3api restore-object --restore-request Days=7 --bucket <bucketName> --key "$x"
        echo "Done restoring $x"
      done
    

Credit goes to Josh at http://capnjosh.com/blog/a-client-error-invalidobjectstate-occurred-when-calling-the-copyobject-operation-operation-is-not-valid-for-the-source-objects-storage-class/, a resource I found after trying some of the above solutions.

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  • 1
    Try awk 'BEGIN {FS="\t"}; {print $2}' instead to deal with files with spaces in them – Paul Carey May 1 '18 at 7:42
5
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I recently needed to restore a whole bucket and all its files and folders. You will need s3cmd and aws cli tools configured with your credentials to run this.

I've found this pretty robust to handle errors with specific objects in the bucket that might have already had a restore request.

#!/bin/sh

# This will give you a nice list of all objects in the bucket with the bucket name stripped out
s3cmd ls -r s3://<your-bucket-name> | awk '{print $4}' | sed 's#s3://<your-bucket-name>/##' > glacier-restore.txt

for x in `cat glacier-restore.txt`
do
    echo "restoring $x"
    aws s3api restore-object --restore-request Days=7 --bucket <your-bucket-name> --profile <your-aws-credentials-profile> --key "$x"
done
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4
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Here is my version of the aws cli interface and how to restore data from glacier. I modified some of the above examples to work when the key of the files to be restored contain spaces.

# Parameters
BUCKET="my-bucket" # the bucket you want to restore, no s3:// no slashes
BPATH="path/in/bucket/" # the objects prefix you wish to restore (mind the `/`) 
DAYS=1 # For how many days you wish to restore the data.

# Restore the objects
aws s3 ls s3://{BUCKET}/${BPATH} --recursive | \
awk '{out=""; for(i=4;i<=NF;i++){out=out" "$i}; print out}'| \
xargs -I {} aws s3api restore-object --restore-request Days={DAYS} \
--bucket {BUCKET} --key "{}"
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3
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It looks like S3 Browser can "restore from Glacier" at the folder level, but not bucket level. The only thing is you have to buy the Pro version. So not the best solution.

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  • The free and portable version can also initiate a restore from a folder. It then queues tasks to restore each individual file. – Dom Feb 5 '14 at 22:34
2
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A variation on Dustin's answer to use AWS CLI, but to use recursion and pipe to sh to skip errors (like if some objects have already requested restore...)

BUCKET=my-bucket
BPATH=/path/in/bucket
DAYS=1
aws s3 ls s3://$BUCKET$BPATH --recursive | awk '{print $4}' | xargs -L 1 \
 echo aws s3api restore-object --restore-request Days=$DAYS \
 --bucket $BUCKET --key | sh

The xargs echo bit generates a list of "aws s3api restore-object" commands and by piping that to sh, you can continue on error.

NOTE: Ubuntu 14.04 aws-cli package is old. In order to use --recursive you'll need to install via github.

POSTSCRIPT: Glacier restores can get unexpectedly pricey really quickly. Depending on your use case, you may find the Infrequent Access tier to be more appropriate. AWS have a nice explanation of the different tiers.

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  • With the new pricing tiers, you can use the bulk retrieval method to keep costs under control: aws.amazon.com/glacier/pricing – Ana Todor Nov 30 '16 at 13:58
  • Hey @AnaTodor, could you give an example retrieving a full folder in bulk mode with aws cli? Thanks a lot! :) – marcostvz Dec 1 '16 at 10:43
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    @marcostvz any of the solutions above work. But beside the Days parameter you also need to specify GlacierJobParameters={Tier="Bulk"}. See the shorthand syntax here : docs.aws.amazon.com/cli/latest/reference/s3api/… – Ana Todor Dec 1 '16 at 11:01
  • Nice @AnaTodor, and should I request the bulk tier file by file or can I provide a list of files or even a folder to restore? My main goal with this is to avoid making many requests and try to be only billed once. :) – marcostvz Dec 1 '16 at 11:14
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    @marcostvz Unfortunately, requests are made only per object / file. If you want to restore a whole bucket you have to recursively traverse the bucket and issue a request for each, just like specified above. To save cost more, you are advised to merge/zip files before glaciering. For example, bulk restoring 30 TB of data costs around 75 USD with the new prices. But if those TB are from 60 million files, you will pay 1500 USD on top for the requests. – Ana Todor Dec 1 '16 at 12:01
1
0

This command worked for me:

aws s3api list-objects-v2 \
--bucket BUCKET_NAME \
--query "Contents[?StorageClass=='GLACIER']" \
--output text | \
awk -F $'\t' '{print $2}' | \
tr '\n' '\0' | \
xargs -L 1 -0 \
aws s3api restore-object \
--restore-request Days=7 \
--bucket BUCKET_NAME \
--key

ProTip

  • This command can take quite while if you have lots of objects.
  • Don't CTRL-C / break the command otherwise you'll have to wait for the processed objects to move out of the RestoreAlreadyInProgress state before you can re-run it. It can take a few hours for the state to transition. You'll see this error message if you need to wait: An error occurred (RestoreAlreadyInProgress) when calling the RestoreObject operation
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0
0

I've been through this mill today and came up with the following based on the answers above and having also tried s3cmd. s3cmd doesn't work for mixed buckets (Glacier and Standard). This will do what you need in two steps - first create a glacier file list and then ping the s3 cli requests off (even if they have already occurred). It will also keep a track of which have been requested already so you can restart the script as necessary. Watch out for the TAB (\t) in the cut command quoted below:

#/bin/sh

bucket="$1"
glacier_file_list="glacier-restore-me-please.txt"
glacier_file_done="glacier-requested-restore-already.txt"

if [ "X${bucket}" = "X" ]
then
  echo "Please supply bucket name as first argument"
  exit 1
fi

aws s3api list-objects-v2 --bucket ${bucket} --query "Contents[?StorageClass=='GLACIER']" --output text |cut -d '\t' -f 2 > ${glacier_file_list}

if $? -ne 0
then
  echo "Failed to fetch list of objects from bucket ${bucket}"
  exit 1
fi

echo "Got list of glacier files from bucket ${bucket}"

while read x
do
  echo "Begin restoring $x"
  aws s3api restore-object --restore-request Days=7 --bucket ${bucket} --key "$x"

  if [ $? -ne 0 ]
  then
    echo "Failed to restore \"$x\""
  else
    echo "Done requested restore of \"$x\""
  fi

  # Log those done
  #
  echo "$x" >> ${glacier_file_done}

done < ${glacier_file_list}
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