1

I'm looking for the best way to split an HTML document over some tag in C# using HtmlAgilityPack. I want to preserve the intended markup as I'm doing the split. Here is an example.

If the document is like this:

<p>
<div>
    <p>
        Stuff
    </p>
    <p>
        <ul>
            <li>Bullet 1</li>
            <li><a href="#">link</a></li>
            <li>Bullet 3</li>
        </ul>
    </p>
            <span>Footer</span>
</div>
</p>

Once it's split, it should look like this:

Part 1

<p>
<div>
    <p>
        Stuff
    </p>
    <p>
        <ul>
            <li>Bullet 1</li>
        </ul>
    </p>
</div>
</p>

Part 2

<p>
<div>
    <p>
        <ul>
            <li>Bullet 3</li>
        </ul>
    </p>
            <span>Footer</span>
</div>

</p>

What would be the best way of doing something like that?

3

Definitely not by . (Note: this was originally a tag on the question—now removed.) I'm usually not one to jump on The Pony is Coming bandwagon, but this is one case in which regular expressions would be particularly bad.

First, I would write a recursive function that removes all siblings of a node that follow that node—call it RemoveSiblingsAfter(node)—and then calls itself on its parent, so that all siblings following the parent are removed as well (and all siblings following the grandparent, and so on). You can use an XPath to find the node(s) on which you want to split, e.g. doc.DocumentNode.SelectNodes("//a[@href='#']"), and call the function on that node. When done, you'd remove the splitting node itself, and that's it. You'd repeat these steps for a copy of the original document, except you'd implement RemoveSiblingsBefore(node) to remove siblings that precede a node.

In your example, RemoveSiblingsBefore would act as follows:

  1. <a href="#"> has no siblings, so recurse on parent, <li>.
  2. <li> has a preceding sibling—<li>Bullet 1</li>—so remove, and recurse on parent, <ul>.
  3. <ul> has no siblings, so recurse on parent, <p>.
  4. <p> has a preceding sibling—<p>Stuff</p>—so remove, and recurse on parent, <div>.
  5. and so on.
  • Thanks, that makes sense, but I also need to duplicate all the ancestors of the item below the link for it to be a valid split – Greg R Nov 17 '13 at 19:18
  • See my edit for more details. – Andrew Cheong Nov 17 '13 at 19:36
  • Thanks Andrew. I am trying to do what you suggested, or a version of it. DFS to find the node and to build the first part of the document. Then walk up the tree to build just ancestors of that node. Then add the remainder of the tree to that. Still working it out. – Greg R Nov 17 '13 at 20:06
  • Hm. Do you have a link to any documentation? I can't find it. But looking at other example questions about html-agility-pack, you should be able to use XPath selectors instead of doing a DFS. See here. Your version would be doc.DocumentNode.SelectNodes("//a[@href='#']"). That link also gives a hint as to how to iterate through siblings: node.PreviousSibling. You can iterate until NULL. – Andrew Cheong Nov 17 '13 at 20:10
  • Adding the first part of what I got so far below – Greg R Nov 17 '13 at 20:19
3

Here is what I came up with. This does the split and removes the "empty" elements of the element where the split happens.

    private static void SplitDocument()
    {
        var doc = new HtmlDocument();
        doc.Load("HtmlDoc.html");
        var links = doc.DocumentNode.SelectNodes("//a[@href]");
        var firstPart = GetFirstPart(doc.DocumentNode, links[0]).DocumentNode.InnerHtml;
        var secondPart = GetSecondPart(links[0]).DocumentNode.InnerHtml;
    }

    private static HtmlDocument GetFirstPart(HtmlNode currNode, HtmlNode link)
    {
        var nodeStack = new Stack<Tuple<HtmlNode, HtmlNode>>();        
        var newDoc = new HtmlDocument();
        var parent = newDoc.DocumentNode;

        nodeStack.Push(new Tuple<HtmlNode, HtmlNode>(currNode, parent));

        while (nodeStack.Count > 0)
        {
            var curr = nodeStack.Pop();
            var copyNode = curr.Item1.CloneNode(false);
            curr.Item2.AppendChild(copyNode);

            if (curr.Item1 == link)
            {
                var nodeToRemove = NodeAndEmptyAncestors(copyNode);
                nodeToRemove.ParentNode.RemoveChild(nodeToRemove);
                break;
            }

            for (var i = curr.Item1.ChildNodes.Count - 1; i >= 0; i--)
            {
                nodeStack.Push(new Tuple<HtmlNode, HtmlNode>(curr.Item1.ChildNodes[i], copyNode));
            }
        }

        return newDoc;
    }

    private static HtmlDocument GetSecondPart(HtmlNode link)
    {
        var nodeStack = new Stack<HtmlNode>();
        var newDoc = new HtmlDocument();

        var currNode = link;
        while (currNode.ParentNode != null)
        {
            currNode = currNode.ParentNode;
            nodeStack.Push(currNode.CloneNode(false));
        }

        var parent = newDoc.DocumentNode;
        while (nodeStack.Count > 0)
        {
            var node = nodeStack.Pop();
            parent.AppendChild(node);
            parent = node;
        }

        var newLink = link.CloneNode(false);
        parent.AppendChild(newLink);

        currNode = link;
        var newParent = newLink.ParentNode;

        while (currNode.ParentNode != null)
        {
            var foundNode = false;
            foreach (var child in currNode.ParentNode.ChildNodes)
            {
                if (foundNode) newParent.AppendChild(child.Clone());
                if (child == currNode) foundNode = true;
            }

            currNode = currNode.ParentNode;
            newParent = newParent.ParentNode;
        }

        var nodeToRemove = NodeAndEmptyAncestors(newLink);
        nodeToRemove.ParentNode.RemoveChild(nodeToRemove);

        return newDoc;
    }

    private static HtmlNode NodeAndEmptyAncestors(HtmlNode node)
    {
        var currNode = node;
        while (currNode.ParentNode != null && currNode.ParentNode.ChildNodes.Count == 1)
        {
            currNode = currNode.ParentNode;
        }

        return currNode;
    }
  • How'd things go? I tried to understand the above but I think I'm too unfamiliar with the library you're using. Are you emulating a recursive function using a stack? Or are you taking a different, additive approach (adding elements, as opposed to copying the whole thing then removing elements). Mine was the latter, subtractive, but both ways work. I'm just curious what you're up to. If you figure it all out, it'd be great if you edited your answer to include the final solution, and explained a little bit, for future viewers too. Thanks! – Andrew Cheong Nov 17 '13 at 22:21
  • I ended up using the additive approach. Something like this. First part: 1) Do the depth first search to find the split node, while creating the first half document via sequential adds. 2) Once found, stop and remove the split element and surrounding empty markup. Second part: 1) Traverse the document from the split node up and add each parent to the stack. 2) Pop from the stack and create a document needed to create the wrapper around the split element. 3) Walk up from the split element and add the children below it. 4) Remove the split element and empty markup. – Greg R Nov 17 '13 at 23:24
  • Thanks a lot for your help! Put me on the right track! – Greg R Nov 17 '13 at 23:24
  • +1 - Cool. Always good to have more than one approach. Thanks for updating the thread. – Andrew Cheong Nov 17 '13 at 23:30

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.