2

I'm writing a recursion function to find the power of a number and it seems to be compiling but doesn't output anything.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int stepem(int n, int k);

int main()
{
    int x, y;

    cin >> x >> y;

    cout << stepem(x, y) << endl;

    return 0;
}

int stepem(int n, int k)
{
    if (n == 0)
        return 1;
    else if (n == 1)
        return 1;
    else
        return n * stepem(n, k-1);
}

I tried debugging it, and it says the problem is on this line : return n * stepem(n, k-1);

k seems to be getting some weird values, but I can't figure out why?

5
  • 4
    Well the truth is that your n is never changing. It probably is doing infinite recursion until your stacks get filled. Nov 17, 2013 at 20:25
  • Isn't that a infinite loop? Nov 17, 2013 at 20:26
  • @LoïcFaure-Lacroix Well, it shouldn't change, why should it? I want to multiply the number n for k times. Nov 17, 2013 at 20:26
  • 5
    I think that you want to check k and not n, am I wrong?
    – jcm
    Nov 17, 2013 at 20:27
  • @AlexanderScholz no because the recursion isn't tail recursive Nov 17, 2013 at 20:27

8 Answers 8

4

You should be checking the exponent k, not the number itself which never changes.

int rPow(int n, int k) {
    if (k <= 0) return 1;
    return n * rPow(n, --k);
}

Your k is getting weird values because you will keep computing until you run out of memory basically, you will create many stack frames with k going to "-infinity" (hypothetically).

That said, it is theoretically possible for the compiler to give you a warning that it will never terminate - in this particular scenario. However, it is naturally impossible to solve this in general (look up the Halting problem).

5
  • If the function is tail recursive, it might be able to recurse idefinitely without using more memory than the function really need. Nov 17, 2013 at 20:36
  • @LoïcFaure-Lacroix Correct, you could eliminate the call and reuse the stack frame, I just wanted to give him an idea of what's happening if there is no base case. Nov 17, 2013 at 20:40
  • Yeah, I added my tail call optimizable version. While having k bigger than MAX_INT might not create a stackoverflow with my version, it should give unexpected results at some points if the numbers are too high for ints. Nov 17, 2013 at 20:48
  • @LoïcFaure-Lacroix I am not sure about this and too lazy to look up but I think that C++ doesn't actually enforce this "optimization" (unlike Haskell and probably other functional languages) - So meh :). (Yes, there is even difference in semantic implications should such optimization be preset, but yes, meh.) Nov 17, 2013 at 20:50
  • As far as I know, the language doesn't enforce it but most compiler might be already doing such kind of optimization for a long time. I'm pretty sure GCC does it by default. Nov 17, 2013 at 20:56
3

Your algorithm is wrong:

int stepem(int n, int k)
{
    if (k == 0) // should be k, not n!
        return 1;
    else if (k == 1) // this condition is wrong
        return 1;
    else
        return n * stepem(n, k-1);
}

If you call it with stepem(2, 3) (for example), you'll get 2 * 2 * 1 instead of 2 * 2 * 2 * 1. You don't need the else-if condition:

int stepem(int n, unsigned int k) // unless you want to deal with floating point numbers, make your power unsigned
{
    if (k == 0)
        return 1;
    return n * stepem(n, k-1);
}
5
  • Don't you need return n; when k == 1 in your revision of the original code? Nov 17, 2013 at 20:45
  • @JonathanLeffler No, because the return statement will handle it: n * stepem(n, 0) will equate to n * 1. The only exit condition you need is for k == 0. Nov 17, 2013 at 21:43
  • @JonathanLeffler Oh, if you mean the first code block, I just corrected the conditional checks to show how the algorithm is wrong. The corrected code is in the second block (which does not have the k == 1 check at all). Nov 17, 2013 at 21:56
  • The first block was what I was referring to. It is a legitimate algorithm and works correctly if the second return is changed to return n; — even though it would also work correctly (but slightly more expensively) if the else if (k == 1) return n; condition were removed, as in your second version of the code. The difference is one less function call vs one more test — not huge. Nov 17, 2013 at 21:59
  • I didn't fix that part in the first code block because I wanted to show that returning 1 from that block was mathematically wrong. Nov 17, 2013 at 22:01
1

Didn't test it but I guess it should give you what you want and it is tail recursive.

int stepemi(int result, int i int k) {
    if (k == 0 && result == i)
        return 1;
    else if (k == 0)
        return result;
    else
        return stepem(result * i, i, k-1);
}

int stepem(int n, int k) {
   return stepemi(n, n, k);
}

The big difference between this piece of code and the other example is that my version could get optimized for tail recursive calls. It means that when you call stepemi recursively, it doesn't have to keep anything in memory. As you can see, it could replace the variable in the current stack frame without having to create a new one. No variable as to remain in memory to compute the next recursion.

If you can have optimized tail recursive calls, it also means that the function will used a fixed amount of memory. It will never need more than 3 ints.

On the other hand, the code you wrote at first creates a tree of stackframe waiting to return. Each recursion will add up to the next one.

5
  • may you mean 3 int instead of 3 byte?
    – jcm
    Nov 17, 2013 at 20:46
  • Using two functions seems a little unnecessarily complex. Nov 17, 2013 at 20:47
  • @jcm yeah we're not using 8bit chips anymore... :( Nov 17, 2013 at 20:48
  • @JonathanLeffler then only use the first one with 3 parameters. The second function is just a shorthand and isn't necessary. That's the price you have to pay to have tail recursive functions. Nov 17, 2013 at 20:49
  • I give you one up vote because we proposed the solution in comments before it was available as an actual response :-(
    – jcm
    Nov 17, 2013 at 20:54
1

Well, just to post an answer according to my comment (seems I missed adding a comment and not a response :-D). I think, mainly, you have two errors: you're checking n instead of k and you're returning 1 when power is 1, instead of returning n. I think that stepem function should look like:

Edit: Updated to support negative exponents by @ZacHowland suggestion

float stepem(int n, int k)
{
    if (k == 0)
        return 1;
    else
        return (k<0) ?((float) 1/n) * stepem(n, k+1)  :n * stepem(n, k-1);
}
3
  • @LoïcFaure-Lacroix ;-)
    – jcm
    Nov 17, 2013 at 21:01
  • The only issue I have with this is the <=0 check. If k is negative, the return value (mathematically) would be a fraction, not 1. The safer solution is to prevent negative numbers for the exponent, altogether (unless the desire is to actually handle floating point numbers). Nov 17, 2013 at 21:45
  • @ZacHowland I agree that, being strict, using negative exponential, would mean return a fraction but, taking into account proposed function signature, I assumed that only positive values are expected. I would update it to support negative exponents ;-)
    – jcm
    Nov 17, 2013 at 22:11
0
// Power.cpp : Defines the entry point for the console application.
//


#include <stream>

using namespace std;

int power(int n, int k);

void main()
{
    int x,y;

    cin >>x>>y;

    cout<<power(x,y)<<endl;


}

int power(int n, int k)
{
    if (k==0)
        return 1;
    else if(k==1) // This condition is working :) //
        return n;
    else
        return n*power(n,k-1);
}
0

your Program is wrong and it Does not support negative value given by user, check this one

int power(int n, int k){
'if(k==0)
 return 1;
 else if(k<0)
 return ((x*power(x,y+1))*(-1));
 else
 return n*power(n,k-1);
 }
0

sorry i changed your variable names but i hope you will understand;

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

double  power(double , int);// it should be double because you also need to handle negative powers which may cause fractions

int main()
{
 cout<<"please enter the number to be powered up\n";
 double number;
 cin>>number;
 cout<<"please enter the number to be powered up\n";
 int pow;
 cin>>pow;
 double result = power(number, pow);
 cout<<"answer is "<<result <<endl;
}

 double power( double x, int n)
{

if (n==0)
    return 1;
if (n>=1)
    /*this will work OK even when n==1 no need to put additional condition as n==1
    according to calculation it will show x as previous condition will force it to be x;
    try to make pseudo code on your note book you will understand what i really mean*/
    if (n<0)
    return x*power(x, n-1);
   return 1/x*power(x, n+1);// this will handle negative power as you should know how negative powers are handled in maths
}
-1
int stepem(int n, int k)

{
    if (k == 0)   //not n cause you have to vary y i.e k if you want to find x^y
        return 1; 
    else if (k == 1)
        return n;  //x^1=x,so when k=1 it should be x i.e n
    else
        return n * stepem(n, k-1);
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.