For some reason I am having a hard time sending and receiving data from the same socket. Anyways here is my client code:

var client = new UdpClient();
IPEndPoint ep = new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Parse("127.0.0.1"), 11000); // endpoint where server is listening (testing localy)
client.Connect(ep); 

// send data
client.Send(new byte[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 }, 5);

// then receive data
var receivedData = client.Receive(ref ep);  // Exception: An existing connection was forcibly closed by the remote host

Basically I want to create a protocol where I send a udp packet and then I expect a response. Just like the HTTP protocol for every request there is a response. This code works if the server is on a different computer. There might be the case where the server and client are on the same computer though.

Here is the server:

UdpClient udpServer = new UdpClient(UDP_LISTEN_PORT);

while (true)
{
    var groupEP = new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Any, 11000); // listen on any port
    var data = udpServer.Receive(ref groupEP);
    udpServer.Send(new byte[] { 1 }, 1); // if data is received reply letting the client know that we got his data          
}

Edit

the reason why I cannot use tcp is because sometimes the client is behind a NAT (router) and it is simpler to do UDP hole punching than TCP.


Solution:

thanks to markmnl answer here is my code:

Server:

UdpClient udpServer = new UdpClient(11000);

while (true)
{
    var remoteEP = new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Any, 11000); 
    var data = udpServer.Receive(ref remoteEP); // listen on port 11000
    Console.Write("receive data from " + remoteEP.ToString());
    udpServer.Send(new byte[] { 1 }, 1, remoteEP); // reply back
}

Client code:

var client = new UdpClient();
IPEndPoint ep = new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Parse("127.0.0.1"), 11000); // endpoint where server is listening
client.Connect(ep);

// send data
client.Send(new byte[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 }, 5);

// then receive data
var receivedData = client.Receive(ref ep);

Console.Write("receive data from " + ep.ToString());

Console.Read();
up vote 20 down vote accepted

(I presume you are aware that using UDP(User Datagram Protocol) does not guarantee delivery, checks for duplicates and congestion control and will just answer your question).

In your server this line:

var data = udpServer.Receive(ref groupEP);

re-assigns groupEP from what you had to a the address you receive something on.

This line:

udpServer.Send(new byte[] { 1 }, 1); 

Will not work since you have not specified who to send the data to. (It works on your client because you called connect which means send will always be sent to the end point you connected to, of course we don't want that on the server as we could have many clients). I would:

UdpClient udpServer = new UdpClient(UDP_LISTEN_PORT);

while (true)
{
    var remoteEP = new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Any, 11000);
    var data = udpServer.Receive(ref remoteEP);
    udpServer.Send(new byte[] { 1 }, 1, remoteEP); // if data is received reply letting the client know that we got his data          
}

Also if you have server and client on the same machine you should have them on different ports.

  • Can you expand on that last sentence? – Dweeberly Nov 18 '13 at 3:22
  • You will get address already in use exception if you try bind a socket to a port already in use. However I see you do not specify a port for you UdpClient in the client so not to worry, you already are using a different port. – markmnl Nov 18 '13 at 3:51
  • Use Using (var udpServer = new UdpClient(UDP_LISTEN_PORT)) { } – GooliveR Apr 18 '17 at 10:30
  • 1
    @ArteS I would not use using if you intend to use the UdpClient again especially frequently - it would be wasteful to dispose and re-create each time. So unfortunately cannot use usings helpful sytatic sugar to take care of disposing for you and will have to take care do it yourself. – markmnl Jul 13 '17 at 23:44
  • 2
    uhh thats not UDP you know, thats a protocol on top of UDP. I happen to know very well, I have written protocols on top of UDP to enable reliablity.. – markmnl Nov 12 '17 at 23:57

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