4

Is there any way in prolog to ask questions like 4 is 2^X, and then get back X=2? I've tried to use =, ==, =:= all without success (getting either just false or arguments not sufficiently instantiated).

  • It seems like this might be the real question you were asking in your recent, similar question. Perhaps delete the other, unless it yielded some useful answers? – Shon Nov 18 '13 at 8:09
  • 2
    I realize that now, I'm sorry for sort of double-posting! There was some really good answers in that one too, though... – fafner Nov 18 '13 at 8:33
6

With SWI-Prolog and the library(clpfd) you can ask question like that.

 ?- use_module(library(clpfd)).
%  library(apply_macros) compiled into apply_macros 0,00 sec, 39 clauses
%  library(assoc) compiled into assoc 0,03 sec, 143 clauses
% library(clpfd) compiled into clpfd 0,11 sec, 1,456 clauses
true.

 ?- 4 #= 2 * X.
X = 2.
  • I can't use libraries for this particual program :/ – fafner Nov 18 '13 at 7:43
  • I would say that CLP(R) is more appropriate, or at least advise that this will work only for integers – CapelliC Nov 18 '13 at 9:56
  • @fafner: just out of curiosity, why do accept you this anwwer if it can't help with your actual problem ? – CapelliC Nov 18 '13 at 10:08
  • Oops, didn't know I had... Sorry, I've been up all night – fafner Nov 18 '13 at 10:10
  • @false: I guess there is some Prolog out there where use_module(...) vs [...] make a difference. Apart for the ability to restrict the imported symbols, it's hard to spot any difference... It's an ISO requirement ? – CapelliC Nov 18 '13 at 10:24
2

You can use between/3 to generate integers:

?- between(1,1000,Y), X is 2 ^ Y, X == 4.
Y = 2,
X = 4 ;
false.

?- between(1,1000,Y), X is 2 ^ Y, X == 32.
Y = 5,
X = 32 ;
false.

You can also use inf for the second argument of between/3, but without some limiting condition that will cause these queries to loop after they give their first answer. (numlist/3, is another option, in case you find it makes more sense to work with lists of numbers instead of generating a new number each time it backtracks).

Writing a general purpose predicate for this might look like,

within_range(Low-High, X=Operation) :-
    between(Low, High, V1),
    between(Low, High, V2),
    Operation =.. [_, V1, V2],
    Y is Operation,
    Y = X.

Of course, this only works with 2 place operations without considerable tweaking. Some example queries:

?- within_range(1-100, 8=X*Y).
X = 1,
Y = 8 ;
X = 2,
Y = 4 ;
X = 4,
Y = 2 ;
X = 8,
Y = 1 ;
false.

?- within_range(1-100, 8=14-X).
X = 6 ;
false.
  • I should note, joel76's answer advising use of the library(clpfd) is the correct and now standard answer for this in SWI-Prolog. However, my answer is still a viable and simple approach for this problem when external libraries cannot be used for some reason. CapelliC's answer branching on the mode of the variables supplied is a smarter and more efficient approach, but not as pleasing from a declarative perspective. – Shon Sep 10 '19 at 21:10
2

you can check instantiation status of a variable

% E is X^Y
% here are accepted patterns
%
% exp(+,+,-)
% exp(-,+,+)
% exp(+,-,+)
%
exp(X,Y,E) :-
     var(E)
  -> E is X^Y % note: will throw an error if either X or Y are not bound to number
  ;  var(X)
  -> compute_base_of_exp_here(Y,E,X) % note: as above, with E in place of X
  ;  var(Y)
  -> (   X =:= e % we are lucky, only natural logarithms are available as ISO builtin
      -> Y is log(X)
      ;  X =:= 2 % again, we could be lucky, log2 can be rather easy to compute...
      -> compute_log2_here(E,Y)
      ;  compute_some_complex_math_here(X,E,Y)
     )
   ; E is X^Y . % no vars? 

but this is going to be a rather difficult route, without appropriate builtins...

1

Because you seem to have asked the same question before, the short answer:

No, you cannot ask this question like this.

You would have to implement this yourself. The library(clpfd) mentioned does pretty much what you need. At the least, you can try and look at the implementation for inspiration.

  • 1
    Also looking at the expanded source is inspiring :) – CapelliC Nov 18 '13 at 10:19

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