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I'm confused with this, I have a class A ip address which is 10.0.0.0 /8 that would require 2000 subnets, 2n^11 = 2048.. so my network prefix would be /19 and subnet mask would be 255.255.224.0.

My question is this, If given the question "What is the usable address range of first subnet?" What could be my first subnet?

10.0.0.0 or 10.0.32.0 ?

Sorry for my english. Cheers!

  • 10.0.0.0 would be the start of your first subnet, 10.0.0.1 would be the gateway, and 10.0.0.2 would be the first usable address. – Marc B Nov 18 '13 at 15:13
  • hmmm. to clear things up.. my 2nd subnet is 10.0.32.0 ? am I right? – eaponz Nov 18 '13 at 15:24
  • depends on how you split things up. 10/8 provides 2^24 addresses, (2^24)/2000 = 8388.608, so it doesn't split into nice even-sized subnets. – Marc B Nov 18 '13 at 15:27
  • @MarcB Allocating the first address (i.e. x.y.z.1) as gateway is a popular convention, but it is by no means universal. Some admins choose to put the gateway on the high end of the subnet. Some subnets have more than one infrastructure-type device on them, meaning several addresses are used before clients are added. 10.0.0.1 is actually the first usable address in this example, and the first address usable for clients would require more information about the OPs infrastructure. – twalberg Nov 18 '13 at 15:50
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To be honest, the strict convention of Class A, B or C isn't really used anymore. Just focus on your needs and what you have.

Address: 10.0.0.0/8
Subnets: 2000

To get 2000 subnets, your steps were right, you need 2^11 = 2048 available subnets. This gives you 10.0.0.0/19 as the first subnet. Now we can break this part further down. We have 13 host bits, leaving us with 2^13-2 = 8190 usable hosts.

1st Subnet: 10.0.0.0 /19
Network: 10.0.0.0
First Usable: 10.0.0.1
Last Usable: 10.0.31.254
Broadcast: 10.0.31.255

2nd Subnet: 10.0.32.0 /19
Network: 10.0.32.0
First Usable: 10.0.32.1
Last Usable: 10.0.63.254
Broadcast: 10.0.63.255

Live sample

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