63

I am creating an application that searches the database and allows the user to dynamically add any criteria (around 50 possible), much like the following SO question: Creating dynamic queries with entity framework. I currently have working a search that checks each criteria, and if it is not blank it adds it to the query.

C#

var query = Db.Names.AsQueryable();
  if (!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(first))
      query = query.Where(q => q.first.Contains(first));
  if (!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(last))
      query = query.Where(q => q.last.Contains(last));
  //.. around 50 additional criteria
  return query.ToList();

This code produces something similar to the following in sql server (I simplified for easier understanding)

SQL

SELECT
    [Id],
    [FirstName],
    [LastName],
    ...etc
FROM [dbo].[Names]
WHERE [FirstName] LIKE '%first%'
  AND [LastName] LIKE '%last%'

I am now trying to add a way to generate the following SQL with C# through entity framework but with an OR instead of an AND, while still keeping the ability to add criteria dynamically.

SQL

SELECT
    [Id],
    [FirstName],
    [LastName],
    ...etc
  FROM [dbo].[Names]
WHERE [FirstName] LIKE '%first%'
  OR [LastName] LIKE '%last%' <-- NOTICE THE "OR"

Usually the criteria wont be larger than two or three items for a query but combining them into one gigantic query is not an option. I have tried concat, union, and intersect and they just all duplicate the query and join them with UNION.

Is there a simple and clean way to add "OR" conditions to a dynamically generated query using entity framework?

Edit with my solution - 9/29/2015

Since posting this, I have noticed this has received a little attention, so I decided to post my solution

// Make sure to add required nuget
// PM> Install-Package LinqKit

var searchCriteria = new 
{
    FirstName = "sha",
    LastName = "hill",
    Address = string.Empty,
    Dob = (DateTime?)new DateTime(1970, 1, 1),
    MaritalStatus = "S",
    HireDate = (DateTime?)null,
    LoginId = string.Empty,
};

var predicate = PredicateBuilder.False<Person>();
if (!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(searchCriteria.FirstName))
{
    predicate = predicate.Or(p => p.FirstName.Contains(searchCriteria.FirstName));
}

if (!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(searchCriteria.LastName))
{
    predicate = predicate.Or(p => p.LastName.Contains(searchCriteria.LastName));
}

// Quite a few more conditions...

foreach(var person in this.Persons.Where(predicate.Compile()))
{
    Console.WriteLine("First: {0} Last: {1}", person.FirstName, person.LastName);
}
4
  • 3
    You may want to look into something like Predicate Builder which makes it easier to do the and's and or's.
    – Steven V
    Nov 18, 2013 at 18:13
  • Predicate Builder is really the answer here, but I'm just curious...why is combining them "not an option"? You say it won't be larger than two or three items. SQL Server would likely be able to optimize your large combined query to run at a similar speed to a single one with the same conditions. Have you tested this and found that joining the queries is a performance bottleneck?
    – Ocelot20
    Nov 18, 2013 at 18:25
  • Looking into predicate builder, I believe it is the answer. Thanks Steven V, if you want to submit an answer I will mark it as answered. Combining them into a large query is not an option because I would need to check every criteria inline blank then I would do the actual filtering, and that is over 50 criteria. It would make the query slow and hard to manage. Nov 18, 2013 at 18:28
  • An alternative to Predicate Builder is the code in the accepted answer here: stackoverflow.com/questions/15677492/…
    – GilShalit
    Jul 21, 2019 at 15:48

4 Answers 4

32

You're probably looking for something like Predicate Builder which allows you to control the AND's and OR's of the where statement easier.

There's also Dynamic Linq which allows you to submit the WHERE clause like a SQL string and it will parse it into the correct predicate for a WHERE.

24

While LINQKit and its PredicateBuilder are fairly versatile, it's possible to do this more directly with a few simple utilities (each of which can serve as the foundation for other Expression-manipulating operations):

First, a general-purpose Expression Replacer:

public class ExpressionReplacer : ExpressionVisitor
{
    private readonly Func<Expression, Expression> replacer;

    public ExpressionReplacer(Func<Expression, Expression> replacer)
    {
        this.replacer = replacer;
    }

    public override Expression Visit(Expression node)
    {
        return base.Visit(replacer(node));
    }
}

Next, a simple utility method to replace one parameter's usage with another parameter in a given expression:

public static T ReplaceParameter<T>(T expr, ParameterExpression toReplace, ParameterExpression replacement)
    where T : Expression
{
    var replacer = new ExpressionReplacer(e => e == toReplace ? replacement : e);
    return (T)replacer.Visit(expr);
}

This is necessary because the lambda parameters in two different expressions are actually different parameters, even when they have the same name. For example, if you want to end up with q => q.first.Contains(first) || q.last.Contains(last), then the q in q.last.Contains(last) must be the exact same q that's provided at the beginning of the lambda expression.

Next we need a general-purpose Join method that's capable of joining Func<T, TReturn>-style Lambda Expressions together with a given Binary Expression generator.

public static Expression<Func<T, TReturn>> Join<T, TReturn>(Func<Expression, Expression, BinaryExpression> joiner, IReadOnlyCollection<Expression<Func<T, TReturn>>> expressions)
{
    if (!expressions.Any())
    {
        throw new ArgumentException("No expressions were provided");
    }
    var firstExpression = expressions.First();
    var otherExpressions = expressions.Skip(1);
    var firstParameter = firstExpression.Parameters.Single();
    var otherExpressionsWithParameterReplaced = otherExpressions.Select(e => ReplaceParameter(e.Body, e.Parameters.Single(), firstParameter));
    var bodies = new[] { firstExpression.Body }.Concat(otherExpressionsWithParameterReplaced);
    var joinedBodies = bodies.Aggregate(joiner);
    return Expression.Lambda<Func<T, TReturn>>(joinedBodies, firstParameter);
}

We'll use this with Expression.Or, but you could use the same method for a variety of purposes, like combining numeric expressions with Expression.Add.

Finally, putting it all together, you can have something like this:

var searchCriteria = new List<Expression<Func<Name, bool>>();

  if (!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(first))
      searchCriteria.Add(q => q.first.Contains(first));
  if (!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(last))
      searchCriteria.Add(q => q.last.Contains(last));
  //.. around 50 additional criteria
var query = Db.Names.AsQueryable();
if(searchCriteria.Any())
{
    var joinedSearchCriteria = Join(Expression.Or, searchCriteria);
    query = query.Where(joinedSearchCriteria);
}
  return query.ToList();
4
  • 2
    This is sick! I made a GitHub gist of a working example for it (compiling at least in .NET 5.0) gist.github.com/princefishthrower/… Mar 26, 2021 at 7:32
  • My answer baseon yours answer: stackoverflow.com/a/69156702/6859121 . Thanks. Sep 13, 2021 at 2:41
  • How can I use this like query.Where(entity => entity.Collection.Any(joinedSearchCriteria)? How can I build the Expression for the where query? I already tried for hours but didn't find a way to get the Any method info.
    – Snaketec
    May 6 at 12:04
  • @Snaketec: It should work fine as long as your criteria's generic type matches that of entity.Collection. It sounds like maybe you should put together a separate question with details about what you've tried and what behavior/errors you're seeing. May 6 at 15:22
14

Is there a simple and clean way to add "OR" conditions to a dynamically generated query using entity framework?

Yes, you can achieve this by simply relying on a single where clause containing a single boolean expression whose OR parts are "disabled" or "enabled" dynamically at runtime, thus, avoiding having to install LINQKit or writing a custom predicate builder.

In reference to your example:

var isFirstValid = !string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(first);
var isLastValid = !string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(last);

var query = db.Names
  .AsQueryable()
  .Where(name =>
    (isFirstValid && name.first.Contains(first)) ||
    (isLastValid && name.last.Contains(last))
  )
  .ToList();

As you can see in the example above, we are dynamically switching "on" or "off" the OR-parts of the where-filter expression based on previously evaluated premises (e.g isFirstValid).

For example if isFirstValid is not true, then name.first.Contains(first) is short-circuited and will neither be executed nor affect the resultset. Moreover, EF Core's DefaultQuerySqlGenerator will further optimize and reduce the boolean expression inside where before executing it (e.g. false && x || true && y || false && z may be reduced to simply y through simple static analysis).

Please note: If none of the premises are true, then the result-set will be empty – which I assume is the desired behavior in your case. However, if you for some reason rather prefer to select all elements from your IQueryable source, then you may add a final variable to the expression evaluating to true (e.g. .Where( ... || shouldReturnAll) with var shouldReturnAll = !(isFirstValid || isLastValid) or something similar).

A final remark: The downside of this technique is that it forces you to build a "centralized" boolean expression that resides in the same method body in which your query lies (more precisely the where part of the query). If you, for some reason, want to decentralize the build process of your predicates and inject them as arguments or chain them via the query builder, then you should better stick with a predicate builder as suggested in the other answers. Otherwise, enjoy this simple technique :)

3
  • 1
    I like this for most simple dynamic queries. Thank you!
    – Canolyb1
    Jun 19, 2020 at 5:30
  • Yeah, dynamic in the sense that you've got two optional OR statements, but not really dynamic in that you still have to write whatever you need in the Where() function... Mar 26, 2021 at 7:05
  • 1
    @fullStackChris yup, this is the downside I mentioned in the "disclaimer" at the end of my answer. But often such optional OR statements come quite handy and are "dynamic" enough to solve the problem at hand. However, of course for more complex chaining of query predicates, one would resort to one of the other techniques.
    – Felix K.
    Mar 26, 2021 at 10:49
2

Basedon StriplingWarrior's answer, I write my linq extension to do this work in linq way:

https://github.com/Flithor/ReusableCodes/blob/main/EFCore/OrPredicate.cs

The codes(may not newest):

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Linq.Expressions;

namespace Flithors_ReusableCodes
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Make <see cref="IQueryable{T}"/> support or predicate in linq way
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    public interface IQueryOr<T>
    {
        IQueryOr<T> WhereOr(Expression<Func<T, bool>> predicate);
        IQueryable<T> AsQueryable();
    }
    /// <summary>
    /// The extension methods about or predicate
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    public static class OrPredicate
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Private or predicate builder
        /// </summary>
        /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
        private class OrPredicateBuilder<T> : IQueryOr<T>
        {
            List<Expression<Func<T, bool>>> predicates = new List<Expression<Func<T, bool>>>();
            IQueryable<T> sourceQueryable;

            #region private methods
            internal OrPredicateBuilder(IQueryable<T> sourceQueryable) => this.sourceQueryable = sourceQueryable;
            private OrPredicate(IQueryable<T> sourceQueryable, IEnumerable<Expression<Func<T, bool>>> predicates)
            {
                this.sourceQueryable = sourceQueryable;
                this.predicates.AddRange(predicates);
            }

            //===============================================
            // Code From: https://stackoverflow.com/a/50414456/6859121
            private class ExpressionReplacer : ExpressionVisitor
            {
                private readonly Func<Expression, Expression> replacer;

                public ExpressionReplacer(Func<Expression, Expression> replacer)
                {
                    this.replacer = replacer;
                }

                public override Expression Visit(Expression node)
                {
                    return base.Visit(replacer(node));
                }
            }
            private static TExpression ReplaceParameter<TExpression>(TExpression expr, ParameterExpression toReplace, ParameterExpression replacement) where TExpression : Expression
            {
                var replacer = new ExpressionReplacer(e => e == toReplace ? replacement : e);
                return (TExpression)replacer.Visit(expr);
            }
            private static Expression<Func<TEntity, TReturn>> Join<TEntity, TReturn>(Func<Expression, Expression, BinaryExpression> joiner, IReadOnlyCollection<Expression<Func<TEntity, TReturn>>> expressions)
            {
                if (!expressions.Any())
                {
                    throw new ArgumentException("No expressions were provided");
                }
                var firstExpression = expressions.First();
                if (expressions.Count == 1)
                {
                    return firstExpression;
                }
                var otherExpressions = expressions.Skip(1);
                var firstParameter = firstExpression.Parameters.Single();
                var otherExpressionsWithParameterReplaced = otherExpressions.Select(e => ReplaceParameter(e.Body, e.Parameters.Single(), firstParameter));
                var bodies = new[] { firstExpression.Body }.Concat(otherExpressionsWithParameterReplaced);
                var joinedBodies = bodies.Aggregate(joiner);
                return Expression.Lambda<Func<TEntity, TReturn>>(joinedBodies, firstParameter);
            }
            //================================================
            private Expression<Func<T, bool>> GetExpression() => Join(Expression.Or, predicates);
            #endregion

            #region public methods
            public IQueryOr<T> WhereOr(Expression<Func<T, bool>> predicate)
            {
                return new OrPredicate<T>(sourceQueryable, predicates.Append(predicate));
            }
            public IQueryable<T> AsQueryable()
            {
                if (predicates.Count > 0)
                    return sourceQueryable.Where(GetExpression());
                else // If not any predicates exists, returns orignal query
                    return sourceQueryable;
            }
            #endregion
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Convert <see cref="IQueryable{T}"/> to <see cref="IQueryOr{T}"/> to make next condition append as or predicate.
        /// Call <see cref="IQueryOr{T}.AsQueryable"/> back to <see cref="IQueryable{T}"/> linq.
        /// </summary>
        /// <typeparam name="TSource"></typeparam>
        /// <param name="source"></param>
        /// <returns></returns>
        public static IQueryOr<TSource> AsWhereOr<TSource>(this IQueryable<TSource> source)
        {
            return new OrPredicateBuilder<TSource>(source);
        }
    }
}

How to use it:

// IQueryable<ClassA> myQuery = ....;
  
var queryOr = myQuery.AsWhereOr();
// for a condition list ...
// queryOr = queryOr.WhereOr(a => /*some condition*/)

myQuery = queryOr.AsQueryable();

Enjoy!

5
  • 1
    Interesting approach. Having WhereOr change the state and return the same object is an anti-pattern, especially in LINQ syntax. Consider following the pattern used by OrderBy().ThenBy(), where the returned interface extends IQueryable, and each returned object is an immutable query. Sep 13, 2021 at 19:28
  • 1
    Also think carefully about what users would expect when WhereOr() never gets called. Should they get an exception? Or the original query without any filters applied? Sep 13, 2021 at 19:30
  • @StriplingWarrior I fixed issues: return the same object - now it returns new object; throw exception when user never called WhereOr - now will returns orignal query. Sep 14, 2021 at 3:01
  • 1
    You're still changing the original object's predicates, though. So calling queryOr.WhereOr(...) will change the queryOr object even if you don't do an assignment (queryOr = ...). Consider using an immutable collection for predicates instead of a list? Sep 14, 2021 at 15:08
  • @StriplingWarrior oops, my mistake Sep 15, 2021 at 0:59

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