If I have long long x; in c++

how can I loop over each bit in the number to check if it zero or 1?

I would like to count the number of ones in the bits.

  • If it is just the count you want, there are faster methods. Discussion in stackoverflow.com/questions/109023/…. Note that some of those methods require changes for long long. – DrC Nov 18 '13 at 18:22

You need to use shifting >> operator:

unsigned long long x = static_cast<unsigned long long>(your_value);
//unsigned long long fix for issue pointed out by @Zac Howland in comments
unsigned int count = 0;//number of 1 bits
while (x != 0)
{
    unsigned long long bit = x & 1;
    if( bit == 1 )
    {
        count ++;//...
    }
    else //zero
    {
        //...
    }
    x >>= 1;
}

There are other methods that do this in various ways, you can find them here (along with other stuff)

  • The one problem you may run into (implementation defined) is if x is negative. Some implementations implement a right-shift of a negative number by keeping the number negative, so you would never end up with x == 0. – Zac Howland Nov 18 '13 at 18:22
  • @Zac Howland that , i did not expect – Raxvan Nov 18 '13 at 18:23
  • There is no any need to do the shift operation. – Vlad from Moscow Nov 18 '13 at 18:27
  • @VladfromMoscow If all you are doing is counting bits, there is actually no need for the loop at all ... – Zac Howland Nov 18 '13 at 18:45

You need not to do the shift operation.:)

size_t count = 0;

for ( long long v = x; v; v &= v - 1 ) ++count;
  • You realize that v &= v - 1 is basically a right-shift, right? :-P – Zac Howland Nov 18 '13 at 18:33
  • No it is not because left bits are not shifted and filled with zeoes. – Vlad from Moscow Nov 18 '13 at 18:41
  • Sure it is. What it buys you is a default shifting of 0's. That is, if you have 1111, each iteration is basically the same as a << 1. If you have 1001, the first iteration is basically a << 3. It is still effectively a right shift - just with a variable number of shifts determined by the positioning. For counting bits, you can get away without using a loop at all, though. – Zac Howland Nov 18 '13 at 18:43
const unsigned int BITCOUNT = sizeof(long long) * CHAR_BIT - 1;
// or
const unsigned int BITCOUNT = sizeof(unsigned long long) * CHAR_BIT;

for (unsigned int i = 0; i < BITCOUNT; ++i)
{
    unsigned int test_bit = 1LL << i;
    if (value & test_bit)
    {
        // do something
    }
}

If you just want the bit count, you can use the SWAR algorithm:

unsigned int bit_count(unsigned long long i)
{
    i = i - ((i >> 1) & 0x5555555555555555);
    i = (i & 0x3333333333333333) + ((i >> 2) & 0x3333333333333333);
    return (((i + (i >> 4)) & 0x0F0F0F0F0F0F0F0F) * 0x0101010101010101) >> 56;
}
  • Why 8? :P (/pedantic - it should be CHAR_BIT) – Luchian Grigore Nov 18 '13 at 18:24
  • @LuchianGrigore Ah, true ... – Zac Howland Nov 18 '13 at 18:26

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