0

I am writing a recursive method that will calculate a multiplicative Fibonacci Sequence. This sequence is similar to a regular Fibonacci Sequence except that instead of adding the two previous numbers to find the next numbers, you instead multiply them. I currently have this method written but instead of returning what I would think the correct result is, the method is returning 0 no matter what the input number is. Any help or ideas would be greatly appreciated. Here is the method:

public static int fibonacciPower(int n)
{
    if(n < 2)
    {
        return n;
    }
    else
    {
        return (fibonacciPower(n-1) * fibonacciPower(n-2));
    }

}
  • Note that Fibonacci is an algorithm for which recursion is a pretty horrible implementation, generally speaking. – Servy Nov 18 '13 at 18:56
  • Where do you call the method? With what value? – Theolodis Nov 18 '13 at 18:56
  • @Servy tail recursion seems fine to me... – Theolodis Nov 18 '13 at 18:57
  • @Theolodis Fib(5) computes Fib(4) and Fib(3). Fib(4) computes Fib(3) (again) and Fib(2). Fib(3) (run twice) computes Fib(2) (computed both for Fib(4) and twice in Fib(3)). I hope you get the idea. It actually turns an O(n) operation into an O(2^n) operation. That is, unless you cache all previously computed values, but if you do that, the memory footprint goes from O(1) (with an iterative solution) to O(n). – Servy Nov 18 '13 at 19:00
  • That's called tail recursion.... – Theolodis Nov 18 '13 at 19:01
0

You need to return 1

if(n < 2)
{
    return 1;
}

This is because, if n becomes 0, you end up multiplying by 0 and in turn your product becomes 0. Thus instead we multiply with 1 in case of n equal to 0 or 1

  • Beyond that, the formal definition of Fibonacci simply defines Fib(0) to be 1. – Servy Nov 18 '13 at 18:57
  • 1
    @Theolodis Well, it would be 1,1,1,1,1, it wouldn't start with zero, but that's simply the correct result of the algorithm defined. If 0 is 1 and 1 is 1 and everything else is the product of the two previous values, you'll never get anything other than 1. So you could just replace the method with return 1; if you wanted. – Servy Nov 18 '13 at 19:02
  • 2
    Looks like someones one a down-voting spree. – Ankit Rustagi Nov 18 '13 at 19:11
  • @AnkitRustagi Not quite. A few of them are mine, for those that clearly misunderstood the question. Some of them are from someone else though – Servy Nov 18 '13 at 19:13
  • 1
    @informatik01 I have never heard of such a function before myself, and given that it doesn't return anything useful, I'm not surprised by that at all. – Servy Nov 18 '13 at 19:57

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.