3
public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int number1 = 4;
        int number2 = 5;
        System.out.println( number1 + "Score:" + (number1 + number2) + number1 );
    }
}

The output of the above is:

4Score: 94

Why is this? If there is no "score" in there, I understand the result from it, but this I don't know why. number1 and Score: outputs individually first, so then why is it effecting the result to be 94?

1
  • 2
    +1 Valid question, all the info is there. Why do people downvote this? Nov 19 '13 at 8:13
7

You have:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    int number1 = 4;
    int number2 = 5;
    System.out.println( number1 + "Score:" + (number1 + number2) + number1);
}

This is outputting exactly what you told it to output, essentially:

"4" + "Score:" + "9" + "4"

The + operator when used with a string will convert the non-String operands to strings and concatenate the strings together. When + is used with all numeric operands, it is an arithmetic + and just adds the values together.

By putting (number1 + number2) in parentheses, you cause that to be evaluated first, and since both operands are integers, it behaves as an arithmetic + thats adds those two numbers together (producing 9). That result is then converted to a string and concatenated to everything else. It's essentially a shortcut for:

int number1 = 4;
int number2 = 5;
System.out.println( Integer.toString(number1) + 
                    "Score:" + 
                    Integer.toString(number1 + number2) + 
                    Integer.toString(number1) );

If you remove "Score:", then all of the operands are integers, and so all of the + operators are arithmetic addition, and it just sums all the numbers -- i.e. a shortcut for:

System.out.println( Integer.toString(number1 + (number1 + number2) + number1) );

If you want more technical details of the + operator as related to strings vs. numbers, see Section 15.18 of the JLS (15.18.1 describes behavior for strings, 15.18.2 describes behavior for numeric types).


As an aside, the + operator is always left-associative no matter what types the operands are (described in 15.18.1). So the result of the following may surprise you:

System.out.println(1 + 2 + "string" + 1 + 2);

Spoiler (mouse over):

3string12

See http://ideone.com/P11aMI for some more working examples.

1
  • Thank you for your explanation :) Nov 19 '13 at 8:51
5

It's to do with operator precedence and the overloading of the + operator. If both sides are numbers, then the + operator performs addition:

number1 + number2

results in 9, which is evaluated first (as it's in brackets).

Then as the rest of it has the same precedence, it is overloaded to string concatenation, in left to right order. If one or all of the arguments to the operator are not numbers, they will all be implicitly converted into strings. We start off with:

4 + "Score:" + (4 + 5) + 4

As the brackets are evaluated first, we then get this:

4 + "Score:" + 9 + 4

Which becomes

"4Score:" + 9 + 4

Then

"4Score:9" + 4

And your final result will be

"4Score:94"

just as you got.

0
1

the subterm number1 + number2 is treated as an integer. So the sum could be calculated: 9. Using it as a string parameter results in an automatic cast to String, therefore the concatenation of strings is used: number1 + "Score:" + "9" + number1

0
System.out.println( number1 + "Score:" + (number1 + number2) + number1))

This prints out the following values (the one in the bracket results in an arithmetic sum :

4 + "Score:" + (4+5) + 4 

which is

4Score:94
0
System.out.println( number1 + "Score:" + (number1 + number2) + number1));

it will be step by step as

1) System.out.println( 4 + "Score:" + 9 + 4));
2) System.out.println( "4Score:" + 9 + 4));
3) System.out.println( "4Score:9" + 4)); 

Then it shows output as

"4Score:94"

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.