13

If I have a Verilog module 'top' and a verilog module 'subcomponent' how do I instantiate subcomponent in top?

top:

module top(
   input        clk,
   input        rst_n,
   input        enable,
   input  [9:0] data_rx_1,
   input  [9:0] data_rx_2,
   output [9:0] data_tx_2
);

subcomponent:

module subcomponent(
   input        clk,
   input        rst_n,
   input  [9:0] data_rx,
   output [9:0] data_tx
);

Note
This was written as a generic question that keeps cropping up now and again, it is following the self-answer format. Addition answers and updates are encouraged.

  • One piece of information that I couldn't find in the standard (I am looking at an older version) is for instances with empty port lists: Should the parentheses be there as in subcomponent subcomponent_instance_name (); or omitted as in subcomponent subcomponent_instance_name;? Or should this be a separate question? – FriendFX Apr 12 '17 at 3:20
  • @FriendFX Why would you have a module with an empty port list? early versions of tool use to require the brackets (); but modern tools can most likely handle just the ; – Morgan Apr 17 '17 at 9:06
  • Examples are Verilog netlists of chips that have instances of blocks which don't have any logic ports on them, e.g. decoupling capacitors or the chip's logos which don't contribute to functionality. By trial and error I found that indeed old tools don't accept just ; and require ();. I am looking for a definitive reference for this case though. – FriendFX Apr 18 '17 at 2:58
38

This is all generally covered by Section 23.3.2 of SystemVerilog IEEE Std 1800-2012.

The simplest way is to instantiate in the main section of top, creating a named instance and wiring the ports up in order:

module top(
   input        clk,
   input        rst_n,
   input        enable,
   input  [9:0] data_rx_1,
   input  [9:0] data_rx_2,
   output [9:0] data_tx_2
);

subcomponent subcomponent_instance_name (
  clk, rst_n, data_rx_1, data_tx ); 

endmodule

This is described in Section 23.3.2.1 of SystemVerilog IEEE Std 1800-2012.

This has a few draw backs especially regarding the port order of the subcomponent code. simple refactoring here can break connectivity or change behaviour. for example if some one else fixs a bug and reorders the ports for some reason, switching the clk and reset order. There will be no connectivity issue from your compiler but will not work as intended.

module subcomponent(
  input        rst_n,       
  input        clk,
  ...

It is therefore recommended to connect using named ports, this also helps tracing connectivity of wires in the code.

module top(
   input        clk,
   input        rst_n,
   input        enable,
   input  [9:0] data_rx_1,
   input  [9:0] data_rx_2,
   output [9:0] data_tx_2
);

subcomponent subcomponent_instance_name (
  .clk(clk), .rst_n(rst_n), .data_rx(data_rx_1), .data_tx(data_tx) ); 

endmodule

This is described in Section 23.3.2.2 of SystemVerilog IEEE Std 1800-2012.

Giving each port its own line and indenting correctly adds to the readability and code quality.

subcomponent subcomponent_instance_name (
  .clk      ( clk       ), // input
  .rst_n    ( rst_n     ), // input
  .data_rx  ( data_rx_1 ), // input  [9:0]
  .data_tx  ( data_tx   )  // output [9:0]
);

So far all the connections that have been made have reused inputs and output to the sub module and no connectivity wires have been created. What happens if we are to take outputs from one component to another:

clk_gen( 
  .clk      ( clk_sub   ), // output
  .en       ( enable    )  // input

subcomponent subcomponent_instance_name (
  .clk      ( clk_sub   ), // input
  .rst_n    ( rst_n     ), // input 
  .data_rx  ( data_rx_1 ), // input  [9:0]
  .data_tx  ( data_tx   )  // output [9:0]
);

This nominally works as a wire for clk_sub is automatically created, there is a danger to relying on this. it will only ever create a 1 bit wire by default. An example where this is a problem would be for the data:

Note that the instance name for the second component has been changed

subcomponent subcomponent_instance_name (
  .clk      ( clk_sub   ), // input
  .rst_n    ( rst_n     ), // input 
  .data_rx  ( data_rx_1 ), // input  [9:0]
  .data_tx  ( data_temp )  // output [9:0]
);
subcomponent subcomponent_instance_name2 (
  .clk      ( clk_sub   ), // input
  .rst_n    ( rst_n     ), // input 
  .data_rx  ( data_temp ), // input  [9:0]
  .data_tx  ( data_tx   )  // output [9:0]
);

The issue with the above code is that data_temp is only 1 bit wide, there would be a compile warning about port width mismatch. The connectivity wire needs to be created and a width specified. I would recommend that all connectivity wires be explicitly written out.

wire [9:0] data_temp
subcomponent subcomponent_instance_name (
  .clk      ( clk_sub   ), // input
  .rst_n    ( rst_n     ), // input 
  .data_rx  ( data_rx_1 ), // input  [9:0]
  .data_tx  ( data_temp )  // output [9:0]
);
subcomponent subcomponent_instance_name2 (
  .clk      ( clk_sub   ), // input
  .rst_n    ( rst_n     ), // input 
  .data_rx  ( data_temp ), // input  [9:0]
  .data_tx  ( data_tx   )  // output [9:0]
);

Moving to SystemVerilog there are a few tricks available that save typing a handful of characters. I believe that they hinder the code readability and can make it harder to find bugs.

Use .port with no brackets to connect to a wire/reg of the same name. This can look neat especially with lots of clk and resets but at some levels you may generate different clocks or resets or you actually do not want to connect to the signal of the same name but a modified one and this can lead to wiring bugs that are not obvious to the eye.

module top(
   input        clk,
   input        rst_n,
   input        enable,
   input  [9:0] data_rx_1,
   input  [9:0] data_rx_2,
   output [9:0] data_tx_2
);

subcomponent subcomponent_instance_name (
  .clk,                    // input **Auto connect**
  .rst_n,                  // input **Auto connect**
  .data_rx  ( data_rx_1 ), // input  [9:0]
  .data_tx  ( data_tx   )  // output [9:0]
);

endmodule

This is described in Section 23.3.2.3 of SystemVerilog IEEE Std 1800-2012.

Another trick that I think is even worse than the one above is .* which connects unmentioned ports to signals of the same wire. I consider this to be quite dangerous in production code. It is not obvious when new ports have been added and are missing or that they might accidentally get connected if the new port name had a counter part in the instancing level, they get auto connected and no warning would be generated.

subcomponent subcomponent_instance_name (
  .*,                      // **Auto connect**
  .data_rx  ( data_rx_1 ), // input  [9:0]
  .data_tx  ( data_tx   )  // output [9:0]
);

This is described in Section 23.3.2.4 of SystemVerilog IEEE Std 1800-2012.

3

Be sure to check out verilog-mode and especially verilog-auto. http://www.veripool.org/wiki/verilog-mode/ It is a verilog mode for emacs, but plugins exist for vi(m?) for example.

An instantiation can be automated with AUTOINST. The comment is expanded with M-x verilog-auto and can afterwards be manually edited.

subcomponent subcomponent_instance_name(/*AUTOINST*/);

Expanded

subcomponent subcomponent_instance_name (/*AUTOINST*/
  //Inputs
  .clk,         (clk)           
  .rst_n,       (rst_n)
  .data_rx      (data_rx_1[9:0]),
  //Outputs
  .data_tx      (data_tx[9:0])
);

Implicit wires can be automated with /*AUTOWIRE*/. Check the link for further information.

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