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Background:

I'm trying to setup a web page to be used at a specific event as a kiosk display on iPad2 (time and budget preclude the possibility of a native app).

The page is supposed to allow users to browse a few different sound files and see visualisations of them.

I have a cache manifest file which lists all of the audio files that will be required by the page. This results in a long period of downloading when the page is first accessed; this is fine, but I hoped would mean that the resources were readily accessible regardless of the state of the network when they were needed.

I don't mind the page being slow to load when first visited; in this situtation, the idea was that the public wouldn't have to witness that.

Incidentally: as createMediaElementSource() apparently doesn't work in iOS WebKit, meaning that for my audio to be processed by WebAudio I'm having to use createBufferSource() from a buffer constructed from the result of an XMLHTTPRequest. This means I can't stream as <audio> elements would allow, and must rather wait for an entire request in order that I can setup my buffer and start playing some sound. I also have to be very careful about excessive memory usage crashing the browser, so I can't keep several ready-prepared buffers around.

After much frustration, I'm considering an alternative options that don't involve WebAudio; it seems that would mean that I could stream audio, and hopefully not suffer the same delays in switching track or incessant crashes due to running out of memory.

My current problem:

I have onclick events that do something like this:

var request = new XMLHttpRequest();
request.open('GET', "foo.mp3", true);
request.onload = function(e) {
  if (e.target.status === 200) {
    if (e.target.response === null) {
      alert('Empty response for foo.mp3'); //This is the case I don't want 
      return;
    }
    var buf = ctx.createBuffer(e.target.response false);
    var sourceNode = ctx.createBufferSource();
    sourceNode.buffer = buf;
    sourceNode.connect(analyser);
    // etc.
  }
};
request.send();

and an Application Cache manifest that looks something like this:

CACHE MANIFEST
# 2013-11-19T01:24:07.338Z
foo.mp3

NETWORK:
*

The code works much as expected much of the time, in most environments. I've always agreed to any browser prompts to store large amounts of data locally.

However, I'm finding that on iOS devices, when I receive my XMLHttpRequest.onload callback, I hit the case where the status code is OK, but as indicated in the code, the response === null.

Looking at the Safari Web Inspector, I see entries for audio resources that are in the hundreds of bytes, rather than a few megabytes each.

So, I would much appreciate both feedback on my approach and specific answers as to why my cache mechanism is failing.

2

First of all your approach and your code is perfectly fine. However there is a third party who does not want you to write your code like that and who would prefer that you write native code. This third party is Apple.

Whenever you request a resource from the Application Cache which has the header of an audio file, Safari on iOS will return an empty result. You can request the data as blob, arraybuffer or even as plain text, the file will be blocked nonetheless. It will only block audio files and not image files which are stored the same way. Renaming will not help, since the file header itself is parsed to block unwanted content.

Your approach will still work with just a minor modification. If you encode your data on the server, store it encoded in the Application Cache, and decode it on the fly after you load the file, iOS will be unable to detect that you want to load audio files. It is important to masquerade the file header.

One way is to encode your audio files in base64 on the server(choose your own tool). Your load function would remain pretty much the same:

var request = new XMLHttpRequest();
request.open('GET', "foo.mp3", true);
request.onload = function(e) {
  if (e.target.status === 200) {
    if (e.target.response === null) {
       alert('Empty response for foo.mp3'); //This case won't be reached anymore 
       return;
    }

    var decodedFile = decodeFile(e.target.response);

    var buf = ctx.createBuffer(e.target.response false);
    var sourceNode = ctx.createBufferSource();
    sourceNode.buffer = buf;
    sourceNode.connect(analyser);
    // etc.
  }
};
request.send();

The decode function for base64 could be written this way:

function decodeFile(encodedData) {
    var arrayBufferLength = (encodedData.length / 4) * 3;
    var bytesAsString = atob(encodedData);
    var resultArray = new Uint8Array(new ArrayBuffer(arrayBufferLength));

    for (var i = 0; i < arrayBufferLength; i++) {
        resultArray[i] = bytesAsString.charCodeAt(i);
    }
    return resultArray.buffer;
}

This blog post describes the issue in detail: http://html5doctor.com/taking-web-audio-offline-in-ios-6-safari/

  • Interesting, thanks for the reply. I might've guessed it was an Apple-ism. Haven't tried the solution, but I'll bear it in mind if ever I'm in a similar position. – PeterT May 29 '14 at 8:17
  • FWIW, it also will not block video files, which are what we ended up using. – PeterT May 29 '14 at 8:18

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