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Is there a standard file extension for MSBuild files that are not project files but instead more complex build scripts?

I was thinking .msbuild.proj to avoid confusion with other .proj files (which I am aware are actually MSBuild files).

  • I Don't know of a "standard", but I use msbuild.xml as the name. – Cheeso Jan 5 '10 at 17:10
  • I'd like to add that according to the books, names "*.*proj" have special meaning to MSBuild. I don't know if that means anything outside of its own extension mechanism, but it inspires me to just use .proj. – JDługosz Sep 17 '14 at 6:30
77

UPDATE: In retrospect, I've updated the answer to include more conventions. Credit goes to Sayed Ibrahim Hashimi and others on this thread.


.proj

A popular convention for generic use. Commonly used by a main build script.

Examples:

build.proj
main.proj 
company.product.build.proj

.targets

.targets files are those which is meant to be imported into other files using the Import element. Since these files are strictly re-useable they don't actually build anything. They typically are missing the properties and item values to actually build anything.

Examples:

Microsoft.Common.targets
Microsoft.CSharp.targets
Microsoft.Data.Entity.targets

.**proj

Language specific convention where **** represents the language short acronym.

Well-known extensions:

.csproj    | C#
.vbproj    | VB.NET
.vcxproj   | Visual C++
.dbproj    | Database project
.fsproj    | F#
.pyproj    | IronPython
.rbproj    | IronRuby
.wixproj   | Windows Installer XML (WiX)
.vdproj    | Visual Studio Deployment Project
.isproj    | InstallShield 
.pssproj   | PowerShell
.modelproj | Modeling project

.props

A project property sheet used by Visual C++ projects (.vcxproj).

Examples:

Microsoft.Cl.Common.props
Microsoft.Cpp.CoreWin.props
Microsoft.Cpp.props
Microsoft.Link.Common.props

.tasks

A common include file to be imported by a calling MSBuild project. Contains a list of <UsingTask> elements.

Examples:

Microsoft.Common.Tasks
MSBuild.ExtensionPack.tasks

.settings.targets

(This is a related convention if not strictly-speaking a file extension.)

A common include file to be imported by a calling MSBuild project. Contains "various properties related to shared utilities used during the build and deployment processes as well as any other common settings" (Sayed Ibrahim Hashimi, 2009).

Examples:

EntityFramework.settings.targets

Compiler.settings.targets

Library.Settings.targets

  • 2
    I also often use ".user" for non-source-controlled overrides (I have "*.user" in my standard .gitingore file), and conditionally import this file if it exists after the version without the ".user". For example, if I have a <import Project="MyProject.settings.targets" /> then I follow that line with a <Import Project="MyProject.settings.targets.user" Condition="Exists('MyProject.settings.targets.user')" />. That way, if I need to override anything for the local machine but don't want it in source-control, I can put it in there. – DotNetSparky Dec 23 '16 at 17:28
14

The closest there is to a standard is as follows:

  1. .proj
  2. .targets
  3. .XXproj

.targets files are those which is meant to be imported into other files using the Import element. Since these files are strictly re-useable, they don't build anything. They typically are missing the properties and item values actually to build anything.

.proj files are created files which can be built by themselves. They may import .targets files.

.XXproj, for example, .csproj or .vbproj are files which build files containing a specific language. For example .csproj is for C# projects and .vbproj for VB.NET project files. This convention comes from Visual Studio.

4

We just use .build

  • One could use *.工程 to annoy tools that don't have proper Unicode support. – JDługosz Sep 17 '14 at 6:32
2

I recommend what VS does:

.*proj for project files --- msbuild.exe will find them automatically if they match this pattern
.targets for build process --- generally imported towards the end of your project
.props for shared settings --- generally imported towards the top of your project. C++ (*.vcxproj) files use these, and they will doubtless get added to VB and C# default project files at some point.

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