I have three functions test1(), test2() and test3() written in java. I want to write a some code that will iterates and call them into all different combinations.

e.g

  • First iteration execute test1(), then test2() and finally test3(),
  • Second iteration execute test2(), test1() and finally test3() e.t.c.

Is there a possible way to do this through an iterator or I have to do it manually?

  • Have you tried to code it at all? – qwertynl Nov 19 '13 at 17:40
  • 4
    Create an array with three elements - {1, 2, 3}. Write an algorithm that will produce permutations of these elements. For each permutation, traverse the result array. If you find 1 at index 0, call test1, if you find 2 then call test2, and so on....... – MD Sayem Ahmed Nov 19 '13 at 17:42
  • 1
    stackoverflow.com/questions/18398556/java-permutation-of-array this will probably be of some use – Cruncher Nov 19 '13 at 17:45
up vote 9 down vote accepted

You could use reflection to get an array of methods and then go through each permutation of the list and invoke them one at a time. Take a look at the JavaDoc for Class.getDeclaredMethods(). Here is a quick example:

import java.lang.reflect.InvocationTargetException;
import java.lang.reflect.Method;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class SO {
  public void test1() {
        System.out.println("Running test1");
  }
  public void test2() {
        System.out.println("Running test2");
  }
  public void test3() {
        System.out.println("Running test3");
  }
  public void notATest() {
        System.err.println("THIS IS NOT A TEST");
  }

  public static void main(String ... args) throws IllegalAccessException, IllegalArgumentException, InvocationTargetException {
    Class c = SO.class;
    SO that = new SO();
    Method[] methods = filter(c.getDeclaredMethods(), "test");
    PermuteMethod permutations = new PermuteMethod(methods);
    while(permutations.hasNext()) {
      for(Method permutation: permutations.next()) {
        permutation.invoke(that, null);
      }
      System.out.println("----");
    }
  }
  private static Method[] filter(Method[] declaredMethods, String startsWith) {
    List<Method> filtered = new ArrayList<>();
    for(Method method : declaredMethods) {
      if(method.getName().startsWith(startsWith)) {
        filtered.add(method);
      }
    }
    return filtered.toArray(new Method[filtered.size()]);
  }
}

This produces the follwoung output (not that it never calls the notATest() method:

Running test1
Running test2
Running test3
----
Running test1
Running test3
Running test2
----
Running test2
Running test1
Running test3
----
Running test2
Running test3
Running test1
----
Running test3
Running test1
Running test2
----
Running test3
Running test2
Running test1
----

This is using the following (modified) version of this permute class:

import java.lang.reflect.Array;
import java.lang.reflect.Method;
import java.util.Iterator;
import java.util.NoSuchElementException;

public class PermuteMethod implements Iterator<Method[]> {
  private final int size;
  private final Method[] elements; // copy of original 0 .. size-1
  private final Method[] ar; // array for output, 0 .. size-1
  private final int[] permutation; // perm of nums 1..size, perm[0]=0

  private boolean next = true;

  public PermuteMethod(Method[] e) {
    size = e.length;
    elements = new Method[size];
    System.arraycopy(e, 0, elements, 0, size);
    ar = new Method[size];
    System.arraycopy(e, 0, ar, 0, size);
    permutation = new int[size + 1];
    for (int i = 0; i < size + 1; i++) {
      permutation[i] = i;
    }
  }

  private void formNextPermutation() {
    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++) {
      Array.set(ar, i, elements[permutation[i + 1] - 1]);
    }
  }

  public boolean hasNext() {
    return next;
  }

  public void remove() throws UnsupportedOperationException {
    throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
  }

  private void swap(final int i, final int j) {
    final int x = permutation[i];
    permutation[i] = permutation[j];
    permutation[j] = x;
  }

  public Method[] next() throws NoSuchElementException {
    formNextPermutation(); // copy original elements
    int i = size - 1;
    while (permutation[i] > permutation[i + 1])
      i--;
    if (i == 0) {
      next = false;
      for (int j = 0; j < size + 1; j++) {
        permutation[j] = j;
      }
      return ar;
    }
    int j = size;
    while (permutation[i] > permutation[j])
      j--;
    swap(i, j);
    int r = size;
    int s = i + 1;
    while (r > s) {
      swap(r, s);
      r--;
      s++;
    }
    return ar;
  }
}
  • 5
    I don't think you want to shuffle the list. You need to traverse the permutations. – Cruncher Nov 19 '13 at 17:41
  • Well the thinking was by suffling you could easily guaranty each method was called once and that all methods were called – Jason Sperske Nov 19 '13 at 17:43
  • 1
    No need to use reflection in this case, a simple array will suffice. Also, shuffling will probably not generate all combination. – MD Sayem Ahmed Nov 19 '13 at 17:44
  • 1
    Finally got the point about permutations being a better approach. Updated my answer with a link that was added as a comment to the OP – Jason Sperske Nov 19 '13 at 17:48
  • As for reflection, it's true you don't need it but with reflection it's possible to create a generic testing function that deals with all permutations and doesn't need to be updated each time a new method is introduced. – Jason Sperske Nov 19 '13 at 17:49

To get all the permutations, you could use the Guava project. Please look at the Collections2 class.

And then use introspection to call the method on your object.

One can use nested loops to achieve it. Within innermost loop, the call based on the value of counters of the loops

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