3

EDIT::

So the answer I accepted below was not actually the issue. I verified through wireshark that the peers are indeed transmitting over TCP for torrent downloads. So I should be able to connect, but all attempts timeout...


So I'm making a bittorrent client in C++ and I'm using the BSD sockets library for all network communications. I have some code to connect to peers over TCP but every attempt times out. I am 100% certain the peers are valid for the file I'm seeking to download, I started downloading the file in Transmission and the same peers were being connected to.

Here is my connect code, the first part is simply adding a bunch of peers to a vector so I can iterate over it and try each peer:

(NOTE" all of the upper-case system calls are just wrapper functions for error handling purposes. There isn't any funny business happening there.)

    char * HOST;
    uint16_t PORT;

    std::vector<char *> all_ips;
    std::vector<uint16_t> all_ports;

    all_ips.push_back("213.112.225.102");
    all_ports.push_back(18715);

    uint32_t i = 0;
    for (; i < all_ips.size(); i++) {

        HOST = all_ips[i];
        PORT = all_ports[i];

        struct sockaddr * saddr;
        struct sockaddr_in addr;
        struct addrinfo hints, * ai,  * it;
        char strportnum[25];

        memset(&hints, '\0', sizeof(hints));
        hints.ai_flags = AI_ADDRCONFIG;
        hints.ai_socktype = SOCK_STREAM;

        snprintf(strportnum, 10, "%d", PORT);


        GetAddrInfo(HOST, strportnum, &hints, &ai);

        for (it = ai; it != NULL; it = it->ai_next) {

            if ((sockFd = Socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0)) != -1) {

                saddr = ai->ai_addr;
                saddr->sa_family = AF_INET;


                int res; 
                long arg; 
                fd_set myset; 
                struct timeval tv; 
                int valopt; 
                socklen_t lon; 

                // Set non-blocking 
                if( (arg = fcntl(sockFd, F_GETFL, NULL)) < 0) { 
                    fprintf(stderr, "Error fcntl(..., F_GETFL) (%s)\n", strerror(errno)); 
                    exit(0); 
                } 
                arg |= O_NONBLOCK; 
                if( fcntl(sockFd, F_SETFL, arg) < 0) { 
                    fprintf(stderr, "Error fcntl(..., F_SETFL) (%s)\n", strerror(errno)); 
                    exit(0); 
                } 

                // Trying to connect with timeout 
                res = Connect(sockFd, saddr, sizeof(*saddr)); 
                if (res < 0) { 

                    if (errno == EINPROGRESS) { 

                        fprintf(stderr, "EINPROGRESS in connect() - selecting\n"); 

                        do { 

                            //Set timeouts
                            tv.tv_sec = 20; 
                            tv.tv_usec = 0; 

                                FD_ZERO(&myset); 
                            FD_SET(sockFd, &myset); 

                            res = Select(sockFd + 1, NULL, &myset, NULL, &tv); 

                            if (res < 0 && errno != EINTR) { 
                                fprintf(stderr, "Error connecting %d - %s\n", errno, strerror(errno)); 

                                break;
                            } 
                            else if (res > 0) { 

                                // Socket selected for write 
                                lon = sizeof(int); 
                                if (getsockopt(sockFd, SOL_SOCKET, SO_ERROR, (void*)(&valopt), &lon) < 0) { 
                                    fprintf(stderr, "Error in getsockopt() %d - %s\n", errno, strerror(errno)); 


                                    break;
                                } 

                                // Check the value returned... 
                                if (valopt) { 
                                    fprintf(stderr, "Error in delayed connection() %d - %s\n", valopt, strerror(valopt)); 


                                    break;
                                } 

                                break; 
                            } 
                            else { 
                                fprintf(stderr, "Timeout in select() - Cancelling!\n"); 

                                break;
                            }  
                        } while (1); 
                    } 
                    else { 
                        fprintf(stderr, "Error connecting %d - %s\n", errno, strerror(errno)); 

                        break;
                    } 
                } 
                // Set to blocking mode again... 
                if( (arg = fcntl(sockFd, F_GETFL, NULL)) < 0) { 
                fprintf(stderr, "Error fcntl(..., F_GETFL) (%s)\n", strerror(errno)); 

                        break;
                } 

                arg &= (~O_NONBLOCK); 

                if(fcntl(sockFd, F_SETFL, arg) < 0) { 
                    fprintf(stderr, "Error fcntl(..., F_SETFL) (%s)\n", strerror(errno)); 

                        break;
                }     
            }
        }
        freeaddrinfo(ai);
    }

I've been using this site as a guide to non-blocking sockets: http://developerweb.net/viewtopic.php?id=3196

  • 2
    What happens when you try to connect to a localhost service? E.g. starting a listener with netcat, and use your code to connect? – ldx Nov 23 '13 at 22:30
  • 1
    Could it be your trying to connect using TCP to a port expecting to "be spoken" UDP with? – alk Nov 24 '13 at 19:56
  • 1
    For reference: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micro_Transport_Protocol – alk Nov 24 '13 at 20:06
  • 1
    Things I'd do: Use strace -v to see the exact parameters given to the system calls. Use tcpdump/wireshark to see the packets sent/received. Trivial problems like not doing proper byte-swapping can be easily detected this way. – Laszlo Valko Nov 25 '13 at 0:25
  • 2
    You should find a standard client program that you are able to connect with. Telnet or netcat is fine. Then you start watching the working connect with wireshark, and the non-working connect of your code. Compare the fields of the working and the non-working packets, and try to find where the difference is between them. – Laszlo Valko Nov 25 '13 at 23:49
1
+50

I strongly assume the port your program is trying to connect to using TCP is speaking UDP. The latter became the common base of the torrent communication.

For reference please see those two links:

  • So since accepting this answer, I've realized that these peers also accept TCP connections (discovered this definitively by wiresharking while torrenting on Transmission with uTP (microTP) disabled)...so I still have this issue...any further insight? – Ethan Dec 5 '13 at 23:25
  • @Ethan: But surely you do not do this using the port and host as mentioned in your inital question, don't you? – alk Dec 6 '13 at 20:12
  • Using this very host. I just fired up Transmission and wireshark and specifically viewed the TCP traffic for the exact host I've listed (who by the way has amazing uptime). All of the code above is the same...I don't see why it shouldn't connect over TCP if transmission can. – Ethan Dec 6 '13 at 22:23
  • "Using this very host" and port? – alk Dec 6 '13 at 23:41
  • Okay, I take that back, Transmission was using a different port...attempting to connect using that port was a success on my client!!! But receive failed...do I need to loop until there is data available, checking using select? – Ethan Dec 7 '13 at 0:50

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