6

i have this singleton pattern and it runs ok. But when i execute my program with valgrind to check memory leaks, it seems that the instance is never destroyed.

Where is my mistake?

Header

class Stopwords {   
    private:
        static Stopwords* instance;
        std::map<std::string,short> diccionario;

    private: 
    Stopwords();

    public:
        ~Stopwords();

    public:
    static Stopwords* getInstance();
    std::map<std::string,short> getMap();
};

.cpp

Stopwords* Stopwords::instance = NULL;

Stopwords::Stopwords() {
    diccionario = map<string,short>();

    char nombre_archivo[] = "stopwords/stopwords.txt";
    ifstream archivo;
    archivo.open(nombre_archivo);
    string stopword;
    while(getline(archivo,stopword,',')) {
    diccionario[stopword] = 1;
    }
    archivo.close();
}

Stopwords::~Stopwords() {
    delete instance;
}


Stopwords* Stopwords::getInstance() {

    if (instance == NULL) {
       instance = new Stopwords ();
    }
    return instance;
}

map<string,short> Stopwords::getMap(){
    return diccionario;
}

It's not relevant but in the initialization, i read a bunch of words from a file and i save them in a map instance.

Thanks

14
Stopwords::~Stopwords() {
    delete instance;
}

This is the destructor for instances of the class. You probably intended this function to be called when the program ends, as though it were a kind of 'static' destructor, but that's not what this is.

So your destructor for instances of Stopwords initiates destruction of Stopwords instances; You've got an infinite loop here, which you never enter. If you do get into this loop then the program will probably just crash.

There's a simpler way to do singletons: Instead of keeping the instances as a static class member that you allocate manually, simply keep it as a static function variable. C++ will manage creating and destroying it for you.

class Stopwords {   
public:
    static Stopwords &getInstance() {
        static Stopwords instance;
        return instance;
    }

    ~Stopwords();
    std::map<std::string,short> getMap();

private:
    Stopwords();
    std::map<std::string,short> diccionario;
};

Also, you should mark member functions that don't need to modify the class as const:

std::map<std::string,short> getMap() const;
  • Whenever getInstance is called a new instance is created and returned? Wouldn't this defeat the purpose of singletons? – Ehsan Ab Jan 13 '18 at 8:57
  • @EhsanAb No, every time getInstance is called it returns the same object. – bames53 Jan 13 '18 at 17:28
  • ahh I see/ it's static. Didn't see it – Ehsan Ab Jan 23 '18 at 2:44
  • An important word of warning: the Stopwords instance is created on demand! That means its constructor will only be called (once) the first time getInstance() is called. You have to keep this lazy-instantiation behavior in mind for cases you'll be calling getInstance() from concurrent contexts (multithreading). To avoid this problem move the "static Stopwords instance;" outside of getInstance() definition and into the global context (*.cpp) - that way it will be created before the main procedure (not lazily). – Corneliu Zuzu Jun 20 '18 at 9:49
  • Extra note regarding proposed solution: it's even better to make the Stopwords instance a static member of the Stopwords class, otherwise Stopwords constructor cannot be private. – Corneliu Zuzu Jun 20 '18 at 10:22
11

The problem is that you never call the destructor or delete on the instance pointer by hand, i.e. from outside the class. So the delete inside the destructor will never get executed, meaning the destructor will never get executed, meaning the delete will never get executed, meaning... You see what you did there? Your destructor is indirectly calling itself which will not go well. And you never call it from the outside, so it never gets called at all - luckily.

You should change your singleton implementation, maybe a Meyers singleton (look it up), or even better not use a singleton at all. In cases like this one, where they are data sources, there are just too much weaknesses of the pattern to deal with.

  • 2
    He could also use std::unique_ptr<Stopwords> instead of a raw pointer. – odedsh Nov 20 '13 at 14:21
  • Also, a better way of doing this would be just referencing instance instead of having it as a pointer, e.g. return &instance in getInstance() – user1551592 Nov 20 '13 at 14:21
  • @odedsh that would be one possible solution, as the unique_ptr destructor will get called from the outside, implicitly. – Arne Mertz Nov 20 '13 at 14:22
1
  1. You allocate memory for instance with new. So the instance will be alive until delete is called.
  2. Destructor is called in the case an instance of a class going to be killed.
  3. Nothing kills (using delete) your instance, but destructor itself.

So the conclusion is that your instance is never killed.

Usually, when you use singleton you don't care to kill it before the program finishes. Why do you need this?

If you don't you better use static keyword to make explicit the fact that it is alive until the program finishes.

static Singleton& getInstance()
{
     static Singleton s;
     return s;
}
-1

You can implement singleton in C++ by making the instance a function-static std::unique_ptr inside the instance getter, rather than a class-static variable. This ensures a call of destructor upon program's completion, and lets you create an instance that gets accessed polymorphically e.g. through a pointer to an abstract base class.

-6

In your destructor you do:

Stopwords::~Stopwords() {
    delete instance;
}

I would suggest you add:

Stopwords::~Stopwords() {
    delete instance;
    instance = 0;
}

This call makes sure that the pointer is not only removed from memory but points to nothing. When deleting a pointer you need to make sure it doesn't point to nothing anymore otherwise you may get memory leaks indeed.

  • 1
    This wont help anything if the destructor is not actually called from the outside. – Arne Mertz Nov 20 '13 at 14:20

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