72

I have an array of promises that need to run in sequential order.

var promises = [promise1, promise2, ..., promiseN];

Calling RSVP.all will execute them in parallel:

RSVP.all(promises).then(...); 

But, how can I run them in sequence?

I can manually stack them like this

RSVP.resolve()
    .then(promise1)
    .then(promise2)
    ...
    .then(promiseN)
    .then(...);

but the problem is that the number of promises varies and array of promises is built dynamically.

  • from the other answers and downvotes on mine, it seems more people need to read the rsvp README where it explains "The really awesome part comes when you return a promise from the first handler". If you aren't doing this you are really missing out on the expressive power of promises. – Michael Johnston Nov 20 '13 at 20:06
  • Similar question but not framework-specific: stackoverflow.com/q/24586110/245966 – jakub.g Feb 27 '17 at 15:04
122

If you already have them in an array then they are already executing. If you have a promise then it's already executing. This is not a concern of promises (I.E they are not like C# Tasks in that regard with .Start() method). .all doesn't execute anything it just returns a promise.

If you have an array of promise returning functions:

var tasks = [fn1, fn2, fn3...];

tasks.reduce(function(cur, next) {
    return cur.then(next);
}, RSVP.resolve()).then(function() {
    //all executed
});

Or values:

var idsToDelete = [1,2,3];

idsToDelete.reduce(function(cur, next) {
    return cur.then(function() {
        return http.post("/delete.php?id=" + next);
    });
}, RSVP.resolve()).then(function() {
    //all executed
});
  • 3
    this is an excellent way to construct a tree of homogeneous promises that don't require arguments. It is exactly equivalent to using a next_promise pointer to build the tree yourself, which you need to do if the set of promises are not homogeneous with respect to arguments etc. It's just that the reduce function is doing the pointer-to-the-current-leaf bit for you. You'll also want to build the tree of yourself if some of your things can happen concurrently. In a tree of promises, branches are sequences and leaves are concurrent. – Michael Johnston Nov 20 '13 at 20:12
  • 1
    @SSHThis Well first of all, wat. Secondly, the previous response is passed to .then, in this example it's just ignored... – Esailija May 12 '15 at 6:43
  • 1
    Rewroted above code using native Promise jsfiddle.net/5wecfv2w – gotoweb Jul 24 '15 at 9:20
  • 2
    If any of these promises fail the error will never be rejected and the promise will never resolve... – Maxwelll Nov 19 '16 at 5:13
  • 4
    If you already have them in an array then they are already executing. - this phrase should be in bold + bigger font. It's crucial to understand. – ducin Jun 4 '17 at 20:29
15

With ECMAScript 2017 async functions it would be done like this:

async function executeSequentially() {
    const tasks = [fn1, fn2, fn3]

    for (const fn of tasks) {
        await fn()
    }
}

You can use BabelJS to use async functions now

5

ES7 way in 2017.

  <script>
  var funcs = [
    _ => new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(_ => resolve("1"), 1000)),
    _ => new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(_ => resolve("2"), 1000)),
    _ => new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(_ => resolve("3"), 1000)),
    _ => new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(_ => resolve("4"), 1000)),
    _ => new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(_ => resolve("5"), 1000)),
    _ => new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(_ => resolve("6"), 1000)),
    _ => new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(_ => resolve("7"), 1000))
  ];
  async function runPromisesInSequence(promises) {
    for (let promise of promises) {
      console.log(await promise());
    }
  }
  </script>
  <button onClick="runPromisesInSequence(funcs)">Do the thing</button>

This will execute the given functions sequentially(one by one), not in parallel. The parameter promises is an array of functions, which return Promise.

Plunker example with the above code: http://plnkr.co/edit/UP0rhD?p=preview

4

A second attempt at an answer in which I try to be more explanatory:

First, some requisite background, from the RSVP README:

The really awesome part comes when you return a promise from the first handler...This allows you to flatten out nested callbacks, and is the main feature of promises that prevents "rightward drift" in programs with a lot of asynchronous code.

This is precisely how you make promises sequential, by returning the later promise from the then of the promise that should finish before it.

It is helpful to think of such a set of promises as a tree, where the branches represent sequential processes, and the leaves represent concurrent processes.

The process of building up such a tree of promises is analogous to the very common task of building other sorts of trees: maintain a pointer or reference to where in the tree you are currently adding branches, and iteratively add things.

As @Esailija pointed out in his answer, if you have an array of promise-returning functions that don't take arguments you can use reduce to neatly build the tree for you. If you've ever implemented reduce for yourself, you will understand that what reduce is doing behind the scenes in @Esailija's answer is maintaining a reference to the current promise (cur) and having each promise return the next promise in its then.

If you DON'T have a nice array of homogeneous (with respect to the arguments they take/return) promise returning functions, or if you need a more complicated structure than a simple linear sequence, you can construct the tree of promises yourself by maintaining a reference to the position in the promise tree where you want to add new promises:

var root_promise = current_promise = Ember.Deferred.create(); 
// you can also just use your first real promise as the root; the advantage of  
// using an empty one is in the case where the process of BUILDING your tree of 
// promises is also asynchronous and you need to make sure it is built first 
// before starting it

current_promise = current_promise.then(function(){
  return // ...something that returns a promise...;
});

current_promise = current_promise.then(function(){
  return // ...something that returns a promise...;
});

// etc.

root_promise.resolve();

You can build combinations of concurrent and sequential processes by using RSVP.all to add multiple "leaves" to a promise "branch". My downvoted-for-being-too-complicated answer shows an example of that.

You can also use Ember.run.scheduleOnce('afterRender') to ensure that something done in one promise gets rendered before the next promise is fired -- my downvoted-for-being-too-complicated answer also shows an example of that.

  • 3
    This is a lot better, however I feel like you're still drifting off topic. This is common to many answers on promises, people don't seem to take the time to read the question, instead they simply comment on some aspect of promises which they personally understand. The original question does not involve parallel execution, not even a little bit, and it does clearly show that simply chaining via then is desired, you've given a lot of extra information which is hiding the answer to the question which was asked. – David McMullin Nov 20 '13 at 23:18
  • @DavidMcMullin "....and it does clearly show that simply chaining via then is desired..." but actually he states the sequence of promises are built up dynamically. So he does need to understand how to construct a tree, even if in this case it is the simple subset of tree "linear sequence". You still have to build it by maintaining a reference to the last promise in the chain and adding new promises to it. – Michael Johnston Apr 29 '14 at 17:51
  • When OP said the "number of promises varies and array of promises is built dynamically", I'm pretty sure all s/he meant was that the size of the array was not predetermined and that s/he therefore couldn't use a simple Promise.resolve().then(...).then(...)..., not that the array was growing while the promises were executing. Of course, it's all moot now. – JLRishe Feb 26 '15 at 18:27
0

I'm going to leave this answer here because this would have helped me when I came looking here for a solution to my problem.

The thing I was after was essentially mapSeries... and I happen to be mapping save over a set of values... and I want the results...

So, here's as far as I got, FWIW, to help others searching for similar things in the future....

(Note that the context is an ember app)

App = Ember.Application.create();

App.Router.map(function () {
    // put your routes here
});

App.IndexRoute = Ember.Route.extend({
    model: function () {
            var block1 = Em.Object.create({save: function() {
                return Em.RSVP.resolve("hello");
            }});
    var block2 = Em.Object.create({save: function() {
            return Em.RSVP.resolve("this");
        }});
    var block3 = Em.Object.create({save: function() {
        return Em.RSVP.resolve("is in sequence");
    }});

    var values = [block1, block2, block3];

    // want to sequentially iterate over each, use reduce, build an array of results similarly to map...

    var x = values.reduce(function(memo, current) {
        var last;
        if(memo.length < 1) {
            last = current.save();
        } else {
            last = memo[memo.length - 1];
        }
        return memo.concat(last.then(function(results) {
            return current.save();
        }));
    }, []);

    return Ember.RSVP.all(x);
    }
});
0

All is needed to solve that is a for loop :)

var promises = [a,b,c];
var chain;

for(let i in promises){
  if(chain) chain = chain.then(promises[i]);
  if(!chain) chain = promises[i]();
}

function a(){
  return new Promise((resolve)=>{
    setTimeout(function(){
      console.log('resolve A');
      resolve();
    },1000);
  });
}
function b(){
  return new Promise((resolve)=>{
    setTimeout(function(){
      console.log('resolve B');
      resolve();
    },500);
  });
}
function c(){
  return new Promise((resolve)=>{
    setTimeout(function(){
      console.log('resolve C');
      resolve();
    },100);
  });
}
0

I had similar problem, and I made a recursive function which runs functions one by one sequentially.

var tasks = [fn1, fn2, fn3];

var executeSequentially = function(tasks) {
  if (tasks && tasks.length > 0) {
    var task = tasks.shift();

    return task().then(function() {
      return executeSequentially(tasks);
    });
  }

  return Promise.resolve();  
};

In case you need to collect output from these functions:

var tasks = [fn1, fn2, fn3];

var executeSequentially = function(tasks) {
  if (tasks && tasks.length > 0) {
    var task = tasks.shift();

    return task().then(function(output) {
      return executeSequentially(tasks).then(function(outputs) {
        outputs.push(output);

        return Promise.resolve(outputs);  
      });
    });
  }

  return Promise.resolve([]);
};

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