I'm dealing with code which essentially boils down to this:

float child[24];
// assume child[] is filled here with some values
float sum = 0;
float avg;
for (int i = 0; i < 24; i++)
  sum += child[i];
avg = sum / 24;

int n_above_avg = 0;
int n_below_avg = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < 24; i++)
  if (child[i] <= avg)
    n_below_avg++;
  else
    n_above_avg++;

Because of floating-point imprecisions, is it possible at the end of this code for n_below_avg to be equal to 0? Assume no overflow can occur, and that all programmers are good-looking.

  • 8
    Well, I believe that in Lake Wobegon all the children are above average but elsewhere ? I'm not so sure. – High Performance Mark Nov 20 '13 at 17:35
  • 1
    Can you provide a set of inputs that produces this result? – Shafik Yaghmour Nov 20 '13 at 17:37
  • I guess in theory you could have (assuming child[] has only two elements) child[] = { 1.0, 1.0 } whereas the floating point division avg = 2.0 / 2 produces avg == 0.99999997 or 1.00000043. – CompuChip Nov 20 '13 at 17:39
  • 1
    @CompuChip 2.0 / 2 is 1.0 for any IEEE 754 floating-point system in any rounding mode. – Pascal Cuoq Nov 20 '13 at 17:43
  • The definition of average would say "no", but as multiple respondents have pointed out, this can happen due to rounding error, when all values are (nearly) the same. One useful trick would be to avoid division by zero (empty sample set), using: if(samples==0) samples=1; – ChuckCottrill Nov 20 '13 at 19:51
up vote 7 down vote accepted

With the computation of avg that you use, it is technically possible for all elements of an array of floats to be above avg.

Indeed, if all elements have the same value v and cause approximations such that the computed avg is rounded down with respect to the mathematical result v, then all elements in the array are larger than avg.

The sort of value v that would cause such a behavior is a value with bits set down to the least significant bits of its significand, so that adding the value to itself 23 times and dividing by 24 causes rounding. If I had to find one, I would enumerate floats one by one until I find one such value, confident it will only take a fraction of a second before one is found.

Techniques exist to compute the exact sum of an array of floats. One algorithm is famously implemented within Python. Using these techniques, it is possible to compute the correctly rounded average of the array. If avg was the correctly rounded average of the array, then I am confident that it would be impossible for all elements in the array to be above it.

  • 2
    One such value v for which this happens is the 32-bit float with the bit pattern 0x3f800002 (slightly more than 1). – duskwuff Nov 20 '13 at 17:52
  • 2
    Also, if the number of elements is ridiculously huge, this is essentially guaranteed to occur for “reasonable” distributions of positive values (unless the accumulator overflows, in which case all the children will be below average). – Stephen Canon Nov 20 '13 at 18:02
  • 1
    +1. Just to point out the obvious: Python's fsum isn't enough by itself for correctly-rounded averages. sum([0.1]*6) / 6 < 0.1 is True, and amusingly fsum fails the other way around: fsum([0.1] * 6) / 6 > 0.1 is also True. – Mark Dickinson Nov 22 '13 at 16:39

On my 64bit system this produces 0 as the output:

void ff() {
    float child[24];
    float sum = 0;
    float avg;

    for (int i = 0; i < 24; i++)
        child[i] = 0.717297;
    for (int i = 0; i < 24; i++)
        sum += child[i];
    avg = sum / 24; 
    int n_above_avg = 0;
    int n_below_avg = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < 24; i++)
        if (child[i] <= avg)
            n_below_avg++;
        else
            n_above_avg++;
    printf("%d\n", n_below_avg);
}

Which is also true for these values (when all values are same): 0.108809 0.891529 0.931835 0.738534 0.354049 0.829201 0.893372 0.858676 0.920128 0.447034 0.187533 0.732149

There is at least one such trivial case: if one or more elements in child are nan, then avg will also be nan, so the comparison child[i] <= avg will always be false (since all comparisons with nan are false).

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