26

This question already has an answer here:

What is wrong in my code?

#!/bin/sh

LOOK_FOR="$1"

for i in `find $2 -name "*jar"`; do
  echo "Looking in $i ..."
  #jar tvf $i | grep $LOOK_FOR > /dev/null
  jar tvf "$i" | grep "$LOOK_FOR" 

  if [ $? == 0 ] ; then
    echo "==> Found \"$LOOK_FOR\" in $i"
  fi  
done #line 13

Output

wk@wk-laptop:$ sh lookjar.sh org/apache/axis/message/addressing/EndpointReference  /media/0C06E20B06E1F61C/uengine/uengine
Looking in /media/0C06E20B06E1F61C/uengine/uengine/defaultcompany/build/uengine_settings.jar ...
[: 13: 1: unexpected operator
Looking in /media/0C06E20B06E1F61C/uengine/uengine/defaultcompany/WebContent/uengine-web/lib/FCKeditor/WEB-INF/lib/commons-fileupload.jar ...
[: 13: 1: unexpected operator
Looking in /media/0C06E20B06E1F61C/uengine/uengine/defaultcompany/WebContent/uengine-web/lib/FCKeditor/WEB-INF/lib/FCKeditor-2.3.jar ...
[: 13: 1: unexpected operator
Looking in /media/0C06E20B06E1F61C/uengine/uengine/defaultcompany/WebContent/uengine-web/processmanager/signedmetaworks.jar ...
[: 13: 1: unexpected operator
Looking in /media/0C06E20B06E1F61C/uengine/uengine/hsqldb/lib/hsqldb.jar ...
[: 13: 1: unexpected operator
Looking in /media/0C06E20B06E1F61C/uengine/uengine/hsqldb/lib/servlet.jar ...
[: 13: 1: unexpected operator
Looking in /media/0C06E20B06E1F61C/uengine/uengine/src/lib/commons-discovery.jar ...
[: 13: 1: unexpected operator
Looking in /media/0C06E20B06E1F61C/uengine/uengine/src/lib/google.jar ...
[: 13: 1: unexpected operator
Looking in /media/0C06E20B06E1F61C/uengine/uengine/src/lib/jxl.jar ...

marked as duplicate by tripleee bash Jun 26 '16 at 15:01

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

70

You need to use = instead of == in the [ $? == 0 ] line.

  • why whats the difference? – kapitanluffy May 5 '13 at 7:54
  • 1
    @kapitanluffy Because the standard says so. It specifies what = does, but == is not mentioned at all and is thus invalid. – Chris Jester-Young May 5 '13 at 15:23
  • Oh, was confused since im seeing scripts that uses '==' instead of '=' – kapitanluffy May 5 '13 at 15:38
  • 6
    == works for bash but for sh we need to use = to compare if two strings are equal or not. – Bhargav Nanekalva May 5 '15 at 9:43
  • 1
    @AlexanderMills sh is not the same as bash. sh is the Bourne shell; its behaviour is specified in POSIX. bash (Bourne again shell) is a GNU project that provides numerous extensions above and beyond what the standard Bourne shell provides. Clearly, it seems one of those extensions is allowing people to use == in its test builtin, something which is not standard and would not be tolerated by the standard Bourne shell. – Chris Jester-Young Dec 9 '16 at 1:25
8

You should change that to:

if [ $? -eq 0 ]; then
    ...

-eq does a numeric comparison.

You can also take advantage of the fact that in shell a return value of 0 is considered success and write your code like this:

if jar tvf "$i" | grep "$LOOK_FOR"; then
    ...
  • 1
    Well, numeric or string comparison doesn't really matter here. – ephemient Jan 6 '10 at 6:10
  • 4
    Exactly my problem. == is only valid in bash but I was using sh. – karlphillip Aug 26 '11 at 19:33
  • sh is usually just a symlink to another interpreter. I was having the same problem as OP, and found on my Ubuntu install, sh pointed to dash, which I presume uses = to compare strings. – Daniel Kessler Jul 30 '12 at 18:56
  • I also found that lbuntu uses dash as the default shell. – Kris Sep 3 '12 at 14:35
  • -eq: unexpected operator – holms Apr 12 '17 at 23:32
2
#!/bin/sh
LOOK_FOR="$1"    
find $2 -name "*jar"`| while read -r file
  echo "Looking in $file ..."
  jar tvf "$file" | grep "$LOOK_FOR" 
  if [ $? -eq 0 ] ; then
    echo "==> Found \"$LOOK_FOR\" in $file"
  fi  
done
-1

Try:

if [[ $? == 0 ]]; then
    echo "==> Found \"$LOOK_FOR\" in $i"
fi
  • 4
    That's a bashism, and I know from the error message posted that the OP is not using bash. :-P – Chris Jester-Young Jan 6 '10 at 5:47
  • Startingly, some distro's have bash for their /bin/sh, FWIW. In this case I think bash works with either = or == so it's probable the OP wasn't using bash (and only bash supports the [[ style I think) FWIW. – rogerdpack Aug 30 '17 at 19:41

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.