544

A strict equality operator will tell you if two object types are equal. However, is there a way to tell if two objects are equal, much like the hash code value in Java?

Stack Overflow question Is there any kind of hashCode function in JavaScript? is similar to this question, but requires a more academic answer. The scenario above demonstrates why it would be necessary to have one, and I'm wondering if there is any equivalent solution.

  • 3
    Also look into this question stackoverflow.com/q/1068834/1671639 – Praveen May 6 '14 at 9:48
  • 29
    Note that, even in Java, a.hashCode() == b.hashCode() does not imply that a is equal to b. It's a necessary condition, not a sufficient one. – Heinzi Sep 24 '14 at 13:34
  • Pls have a look into this qs:stackoverflow.com/questions/35933616/… – forgottofly Mar 14 '16 at 12:43
  • 1
    If you HAVE to compare objects in your code than you are probably writing your code wrong. The better question might be: "How can I write this code so I don't have to compare objects?" – th317erd Feb 24 '17 at 17:50
  • 2
    @th317erd can you please explain yourself?... – El Mac May 14 '18 at 12:44

55 Answers 55

2

For those of you using NodeJS, there is a convenient method called isDeepStrictEqual on the native Util library that can achieve this.

const util = require('util');

const foo = {
  hey: "ho",
  lets: "go"
}

const bar = {
  hey: "ho",
  lets: "go"
}

foo == bar // false
util.isDeepStrictEqual(foo, bar) // true

https://nodejs.org/api/util.html#util_util_isdeepstrictequal_val1_val2

2

Assuming that the order of the properties in the object is not changed.

JSON.stringify() works for deep and non-deep both types of objects, not very sure of performance aspects:

var object1 = {
  key: "value"
};

var object2 = {
  key: "value"
};

var object3 = {
  key: "no value"
};

console.log('object1 and object2 are equal: ', JSON.stringify(object1) === JSON.stringify(object2));

console.log('object2 and object3 are equal: ', JSON.stringify(object2) === JSON.stringify(object3));

  • This does not do what OP wants, as it will only match if both objects have all the same keys, which they state they will not. It would also require the keys to be in the same order, which is also not really reasonable. – SpeedOfRound Nov 23 '18 at 18:09
  • What is the properties are in different order ??? Nope not a good method – Vishal Sakaria Mar 6 at 16:01
1

Depends on what you mean by equality. And therefore it is up to you, as the developer of the classes, to define their equality.

There's one case used sometimes, where two instances are considered 'equal' if they point to the same location in memory, but that is not always what you want. For instance, if I have a Person class, I might want to consider two Person objects 'equal' if they have the same Last Name, First Name, and Social Security Number (even if they point to different locations in memory).

On the other hand, we can't simply say that two objects are equal if the value of each of their members is the same, since, sometimes, you don't want that. In other words, for each class, it's up to the class developer to define what members make up the objects 'identity' and develop a proper equality operator (be it via overloading the == operator or an Equals method).

Saying that two objects are equal if they have the same hash is one way out. However you then have to wonder how the hash is calculated for each instance. Going back to the Person example above, we could use this system if the hash was calculated by looking at the values of the First Name, Last Name, and Social Security Number fields. On top of that, we are then relying on the quality of the hashing method (that's a huge topic on its own, but suffice it to say that not all hashes are created equal, and bad hashing methods can lead to more collisions, which in this case would return false matches).

  • 4
    "bad hashing methods can lead to collisions" => ALL hashing methods can lead to collisions – Joe Oct 14 '08 at 13:59
  • 1
    Yes, thanks for the correction; I edited to try and clarify. – FOR Oct 14 '08 at 14:06
1

Here is a very basic approach to checking an object's "value equality".

var john = {
    occupation: "Web Developer",
    age: 25
};

var bobby = {
    occupation: "Web Developer",
    age: 25
};

function isEquivalent(a, b) {
    // Create arrays of property names

    var aProps = Object.getOwnPropertyNames(a);
    var bProps = Object.getOwnPropertyNames(b);

    // If number of properties is different, objects are not equivalent

    if (aProps.length != bProps.length) {
        return false;
    }

    for (var i = 0; i < aProps.length; i++) {
        var propName = aProps[i];

        // If values of same property are not equal, objects are not equivalent
        if (a[propName] !== b[propName]) {
           return false;
        }
    }

    // If we made it this far, objects are considered equivalent
    return true;
}

// Outputs: true
console.log(isEquivalent(john, bobby));

Demo - JSFiddle

As you can see, to check the objects' "value equality" we essentially have to iterate over every property in the objects to see whether they are equal. And while this simple implementation works for our example, there are a lot of cases that it doesn't handle. For instance:

  • What if one of the property values is itself an object?
  • What if one of the property values is NaN (the only value in JavaScript that is not equal to itself?)
  • What if a has a property with value undefined, while b doesn't have this property (which thus evaluates to undefined?)

For a robust method of checking objects' "value equality" it is better to rely on a well-tested library that covers the various edge cases like Underscore.

var john = {
    occupation: "Web Developer",
    age: 25
};

var bobby = {
    occupation: "Web Developer",
    age: 25
};

// Outputs: true
console.log(_.isEqual(john, bobby));

Demo - JSFiddle

1

I'm not a Javascript expert, but here is one simple attempt to solve it. I check for three things:

  1. Is it an object and also that it is not null because typeof null is object.
  2. If the property count of the two objects is the same? If not they are not equal.
  3. Loop through properties of one and check if corresponding property has same value in second object.

function deepEqual (first, second) {
  // Not equal if either is not an object or is null.
  if (!isObject(first) || !isObject(second) ) return false;

  // If properties count is different
  if (keys(first).length != keys(second).length) return false;

  // Return false if any property value is different.
  for(prop in first){
    if (first[prop] != second[prop]) return false;
  }
  return true;
}

// Checks if argument is an object and is not null
function isObject(obj) {
  return (typeof obj === "object" && obj != null);
}

// returns arrays of object keys
function keys (obj) {
  result = [];
  for(var key in obj){
    result.push(key);
  }
  return result;
}

// Some test code
obj1 = {
  name: 'Singh',
  age: 20
}

obj2 = {
  age: 20,
  name: 'Singh'
}

obj3 = {
  name: 'Kaur',
  age: 19
}

console.log(deepEqual(obj1, obj2));
console.log(deepEqual(obj1, obj3));

1

There is a very simple fix for this one, all you have to do is JSON.stringify() on both of the objects when you compare the two.

  • 1
    why would you downvote this? this works. – ProgramKiddo Apr 2 '18 at 18:14
  • 5
    it doesn't take order into account. Try this: JSON.stringify({a: 1, b: 2}) === JSON.stringify({b: 2, a: 1}) – arminrosu Apr 29 '18 at 14:44
1

Depending. If the order of keys in the object are not of importance, and I don't need to know the prototypes of the said object. Using always do the job.

const object = {};
JSON.stringify(object) === "{}" will pass but {} === "{}" will not
0

I need to mock jQuery POST requests, so the equality that matters to me is that both objects have the same set of properties (none missing in either object), and that each property value is "equal" (according to this definition). I don't care about the objects having mismatching methods.

Here's what I'll be using, it should be good enough for my specific requirements:

function PostRequest() {
    for (var i = 0; i < arguments.length; i += 2) {
        this[arguments[i]] = arguments[i+1];
    }

    var compare = function(u, v) {
        if (typeof(u) != typeof(v)) {
            return false;
        }

        var allkeys = {};
        for (var i in u) {
            allkeys[i] = 1;
        }
        for (var i in v) {
            allkeys[i] = 1;
        }
        for (var i in allkeys) {
            if (u.hasOwnProperty(i) != v.hasOwnProperty(i)) {
                if ((u.hasOwnProperty(i) && typeof(u[i]) == 'function') ||
                    (v.hasOwnProperty(i) && typeof(v[i]) == 'function')) {
                    continue;
                } else {
                    return false;
                }
            }
            if (typeof(u[i]) != typeof(v[i])) {
                return false;
            }
            if (typeof(u[i]) == 'object') {
                if (!compare(u[i], v[i])) {
                    return false;
                }
            } else {
                if (u[i] !== v[i]) {
                    return false;
                }
            }
        }

        return true;
    };

    this.equals = function(o) {
        return compare(this, o);
    };

    return this;
}

Use like so:

foo = new PostRequest('text', 'hello', 'html', '<p>hello</p>');
foo.equals({ html: '<p>hello</p>', text: 'hello' });
0

I've written a small library that runs on Node.js and the browser called compare.js. It offers the usual comparison operators, such as ==, !=, >, >=, <, <= and identity on all data types of JavaScript.

E.g., you can use

cmp.eq(obj1, obj2);

and this will check for equality (using a deep-equal approach). Otherwise, if you do

cmp.id(obj1, obj2);

it will compare by reference, hence check for identity. You can also use < and > on objects, which mean subset and superset.

compare.js is covered by nearly 700 unit tests, hence it should hopefully not have too many bugs ;-).

You can find it on https://github.com/goloroden/compare.js for free, it is open-sourced under the MIT license.

0

A quick "hack" to tell if two objects are similar, is to use their toString() methods. If you're checking objects A and B, make sure A and B have meaningful toString() methods and check that the strings they return are the same.

This isn't a panacea, but it can be useful sometimes in the right situations.

0
function isEqual(obj1, obj2){
    type1 = typeof(obj1);
    type2 = typeof(obj2);
    if(type1===type2){
        switch (type1){
            case "object": return JSON.stringify(obj1)===JSON.stringify(obj2);
            case "function": return eval(obj1).toString()===eval(obj2).toString();
            default: return obj1==obj2;
        }
    }
    return false;
}//have not tried but should work.
  • 5
    Where is it written that JSON.stringify will always list keys in the same order (particularly if they weren't added in the same order to obj1 and obj2). – Ted Hopp Jan 9 '14 at 15:50
0

Some of the following solutions have problems with performance, functionality and style... They are not thought through enough, and some of them fail for different cases. I tried to address this problem in my own solution, and I would really much appreciate your feedback:

http://stamat.wordpress.com/javascript-object-comparison/

//Returns the object's class, Array, Date, RegExp, Object are of interest to us
var getClass = function(val) {
    return Object.prototype.toString.call(val)
        .match(/^\[object\s(.*)\]$/)[1];
};

//Defines the type of the value, extended typeof
var whatis = function(val) {

    if (val === undefined)
        return 'undefined';
    if (val === null)
        return 'null';

    var type = typeof val;

    if (type === 'object')
        type = getClass(val).toLowerCase();

    if (type === 'number') {
        if (val.toString().indexOf('.') > 0)
            return 'float';
        else
        return 'integer';
    }

    return type;
   };

var compareObjects = function(a, b) {
    if (a === b)
        return true;
    for (var i in a) {
        if (b.hasOwnProperty(i)) {
            if (!equal(a[i],b[i])) return false;
        } else {
            return false;
        }
    }

    for (var i in b) {
        if (!a.hasOwnProperty(i)) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
};

var compareArrays = function(a, b) {
    if (a === b)
        return true;
    if (a.length !== b.length)
        return false;
    for (var i = 0; i < a.length; i++){
        if(!equal(a[i], b[i])) return false;
    };
    return true;
};

var _equal = {};
_equal.array = compareArrays;
_equal.object = compareObjects;
_equal.date = function(a, b) {
    return a.getTime() === b.getTime();
};
_equal.regexp = function(a, b) {
    return a.toString() === b.toString();
};
//  uncoment to support function as string compare
//  _equal.fucntion =  _equal.regexp;



/*
 * Are two values equal, deep compare for objects and arrays.
 * @param a {any}
 * @param b {any}
 * @return {boolean} Are equal?
 */
var equal = function(a, b) {
    if (a !== b) {
        var atype = whatis(a), btype = whatis(b);

        if (atype === btype)
            return _equal.hasOwnProperty(atype) ? _equal[atype](a, b) : a==b;

        return false;
    }

    return true;
};
0

Object equality check:JSON.stringify(array1.sort()) === JSON.stringify(array2.sort())

The above test also works with arrays of objects in which case use a sort function as documented in http://www.w3schools.com/jsref/jsref_sort.asp

Might suffice for small arrays with flat JSON schemas.

  • 2
    Not guaranteed to work - object properties are unordered [specific order never guaranteed] according to the EcmaScript 3 spec. – Roy Tinker Oct 29 '14 at 0:43
0

Here's a pretty clean CoffeeScript version of how you could do this:

Object::equals = (other) ->
  typeOf = Object::toString

  return false if typeOf.call(this) isnt typeOf.call(other)
  return `this == other` unless typeOf.call(other) is '[object Object]' or
                                typeOf.call(other) is '[object Array]'

  (return false unless this[key].equals other[key]) for key, value of this
  (return false if typeof this[key] is 'undefined') for key of other

  true

Here are the tests:

  describe "equals", ->

    it "should consider two numbers to be equal", ->
      assert 5.equals(5)

    it "should consider two empty objects to be equal", ->
      assert {}.equals({})

    it "should consider two objects with one key to be equal", ->
      assert {a: "banana"}.equals {a: "banana"}

    it "should consider two objects with keys in different orders to be equal", ->
      assert {a: "banana", kendall: "garrus"}.equals {kendall: "garrus", a: "banana"}

    it "should consider two objects with nested objects to be equal", ->
      assert {a: {fruit: "banana"}}.equals {a: {fruit: "banana"}}

    it "should consider two objects with nested objects that are jumbled to be equal", ->
      assert {a: {a: "banana", kendall: "garrus"}}.equals {a: {kendall: "garrus", a: "banana"}}

    it "should consider two objects with arrays as values to be equal", ->
      assert {a: ["apple", "banana"]}.equals {a: ["apple", "banana"]}



    it "should not consider an object to be equal to null", ->
      assert !({a: "banana"}.equals null)

    it "should not consider two objects with different keys to be equal", ->
      assert !({a: "banana"}.equals {})

    it "should not consider two objects with different values to be equal", ->
      assert !({a: "banana"}.equals {a: "grapefruit"})
  • what if someone overwrites the toString method? – Atmocreations Nov 28 '14 at 9:47
  • Lol, well I guess you may get unexpected results depending on what you did to override it. – Luke Dec 24 '14 at 16:12
0

Sure, while we're at it I'll throw in my own reinvention of the wheel (I'm proud of the number of spokes and materials used):

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

var equals = function ( objectA, objectB ) {
    var result = false,
        keysA,
        keysB;

    // Check if they are pointing at the same variable. If they are, no need to test further.
    if ( objectA === objectB ) {
        return true;
    }

    // Check if they are the same type. If they are not, no need to test further.
    if ( typeof objectA !== typeof objectB ) {
        return false;
    }

    // Check what kind of variables they are to see what sort of comparison we should make.
    if ( typeof objectA === "object" ) {
        // Check if they have the same constructor, so that we are comparing apples with apples.
        if ( objectA.constructor === objectA.constructor ) {
            // If we are working with Arrays...
            if ( objectA instanceof Array ) {
                // Check the arrays are the same length. If not, they cannot be the same.
                if ( objectA.length === objectB.length ) {
                    // Compare each element. They must be identical. If not, the comparison stops immediately and returns false.
                    return objectA.every(
                        function ( element, i ) {
                            return equals( element, objectB[ i ] );
                        }
                    );
                }
                // They are not the same length, and so are not identical.
                else {
                    return false;
                }
            }
            // If we are working with RegExps...
            else if ( objectA instanceof RegExp ) {
                // Return the results of a string comparison of the expression.
                return ( objectA.toString() === objectB.toString() );
            }
            // Else we are working with other types of objects...
            else {
                // Get the keys as arrays from both objects. This uses Object.keys, so no old browsers here.
                keysA = Object.keys( objectA );

                keysB = Object.keys( objectB );

                // Check the key arrays are the same length. If not, they cannot be the same.
                if ( keysA.length === keysB.length ) {
                    // Compare each property. They must be identical. If not, the comparison stops immediately and returns false.
                    return keysA.every(
                        function ( element ) {
                            return equals( objectA[ element ], objectB[ element ] );
                        }
                    );
                }
                // They do not have the same number of keys, and so are not identical.
                else {
                    return false;
                }
            }
        }
        // They don't have the same constructor.
        else {
            return false;
        }
    }
    // If they are both functions, let us do a string comparison.
    else if ( typeof objectA === "function" ) {
        return ( objectA.toString() === objectB.toString() );
    }
    // If a simple variable type, compare directly without coercion.
    else {
        return ( objectA === objectB );
    }

    // Return a default if nothing has already been returned.
    return result;
};

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

It returns false as quickly as possible, but of course for a large object where the difference is deeply nested it could be less effective. In my own scenario, good handling of nested arrays is important.

Hope it helps someone needing this kind of 'wheel'.

0

Yeah, another answer...

Object.prototype.equals = function (object) {
    if (this.constructor !== object.constructor) return false;
    if (Object.keys(this).length !== Object.keys(object).length) return false;
    var obk;
    for (obk in object) {
        if (this[obk] !== object[obk])
            return false;
    }
    return true;
}

var aaa = JSON.parse('{"name":"mike","tel":"1324356584"}');
var bbb = JSON.parse('{"tel":"1324356584","name":"mike"}');
var ccc = JSON.parse('{"name":"mike","tel":"584"}');
var ddd = JSON.parse('{"name":"mike","tel":"1324356584", "work":"nope"}');

$("#ab").text(aaa.equals(bbb));
$("#ba").text(bbb.equals(aaa));
$("#bc").text(bbb.equals(ccc));
$("#ad").text(aaa.equals(ddd));
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
aaa equals bbb? <span id="ab"></span> <br/>
bbb equals aaa? <span id="ba"></span> <br/>
bbb equals ccc? <span id="bc"></span> <br/>
aaa equals ddd? <span id="ad"></span>

0

I have a much shorter function that will go deep into all sub objects or arrays. It is as efficient as JSON.stringify(obj1) === JSON.stringify(obj2) but JSON.stringify will not work if the order is not the same (as mentioned here).

var obj1 = { a : 1, b : 2 };
var obj2 = { b : 2, a : 1 };

console.log(JSON.stringify(obj1) === JSON.stringify(obj2)); // false

The function would also be a good start if you want to do something with the unequal values.

function arr_or_obj(v)
{ return !!v && (v.constructor === Object || v.constructor === Array); }

function deep_equal(v1, v2)
{
    if (arr_or_obj(v1) && arr_or_obj(v2) && v1.constructor === v2.constructor)
    {
        if (Object.keys(v1).length === Object.keys(v2).length) // check the length
        for (var i in v1)
        {
            if (!deep_equal(v1[i], v2[i]))
            { return false; }
        }
        else
        { return false; }
    }
    else if (v1 !== v2)
    { return false; }

    return true;
}

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

var obj1 = [
    {
        hat : {
            cap : ['something', null ],
            helmet : [ 'triple eight', 'pro-tec' ]
        },
        shoes : [ 'loafer', 'penny' ]
    },
    {
        beers : [ 'budweiser', 'busch' ],
        wines : [ 'barefoot', 'yellow tail' ]
    }
];

var obj2 = [
    {
        shoes : [ 'loafer', 'penny' ], // same even if the order is different
        hat : {
            cap : ['something', null ],
            helmet : [ 'triple eight', 'pro-tec' ]
        }
    },
    {
        beers : [ 'budweiser', 'busch' ],
        wines : [ 'barefoot', 'yellow tail' ]
    }
];

console.log(deep_equal(obj1, obj2)); // true
console.log(JSON.stringify(obj1) === JSON.stringify(obj2)); // false
console.log(deep_equal([], [])); // true
console.log(deep_equal({}, {})); // true
console.log(deep_equal([], {})); // false

And if you want to add support for Function, Date and RegExp, you can add this at the beginning of deep_equal (not tested):

if ((typeof obj1 === 'function' && typeof obj2 === 'function') ||
(obj1 instanceof Date && obj2 instanceof Date) ||
(obj1 instanceof RegExp && obj2 instanceof RegExp))
{
    obj1 = obj1.toString();
    obj2 = obj2.toString();
}
0

My version, which includes the chain of where the difference is found, and what the difference is.

function DeepObjectCompare(O1, O2)
{
    try {
        DOC_Val(O1, O2, ['O1->O2', O1, O2]);
        return DOC_Val(O2, O1, ['O2->O1', O1, O2]);
    } catch(e) {
        console.log(e.Chain);
        throw(e);
    }
}
function DOC_Error(Reason, Chain, Val1, Val2)
{
    this.Reason=Reason;
    this.Chain=Chain;
    this.Val1=Val1;
    this.Val2=Val2;
}

function DOC_Val(Val1, Val2, Chain)
{
    function DoThrow(Reason, NewChain) { throw(new DOC_Error(Reason, NewChain!==undefined ? NewChain : Chain, Val1, Val2)); }

    if(typeof(Val1)!==typeof(Val2))
        return DoThrow('Type Mismatch');
    if(Val1===null || Val1===undefined)
        return Val1!==Val2 ? DoThrow('Null/undefined mismatch') : true;
    if(Val1.constructor!==Val2.constructor)
        return DoThrow('Constructor mismatch');
    switch(typeof(Val1))
    {
        case 'object':
            for(var m in Val1)
            {
                if(!Val1.hasOwnProperty(m))
                    continue;
                var CurChain=Chain.concat([m]);
                if(!Val2.hasOwnProperty(m))
                    return DoThrow('Val2 missing property', CurChain);
                DOC_Val(Val1[m], Val2[m], CurChain);
            }
            return true;
        case 'number':
            if(Number.isNaN(Val1))
                return !Number.isNaN(Val2) ? DoThrow('NaN mismatch') : true;
        case 'string':
        case 'boolean':
            return Val1!==Val2 ? DoThrow('Value mismatch') : true;
        case 'function':
            if(Val1.prototype!==Val2.prototype)
                return DoThrow('Prototype mismatch');
            if(Val1!==Val2)
                return DoThrow('Function mismatch');
            return true;
        default:
            return DoThrow('Val1 is unknown type');
    }
}
0

Here is my solution to this problem. I dont consider mine great but it works on object comparison to any type

Object.prototype.fullMatch = function(obj){
    if (typeof this !== typeof obj) return false;
    if (this == null && obj != null || this != null && obj == null) return false;
    var this_keys = [];
    var obj_keys = [];
    for (var key in this) if (this.hasOwnProperty(key)) this_keys.push(key);
    for (var key in obj) if (obj.hasOwnProperty(key)) obj_keys.push(key);
    if (this_keys.length !== obj_keys.length){
        this_keys = null;
        obj_keys = null;
        return false;
    }
    var full_match = true;
    for (var key in this){
        if (this.hasOwnProperty(key) && obj.hasOwnProperty(key)){
            var this_value = this[key];
            var obj_value = obj[key];
            if (typeof this_value !== typeof obj_value || ("object" === typeof this_value && !this_value.fullMatch(obj_value)) || "object" !== typeof this_value && this_value !== obj_value){
                full_match = false;
                break;
            }
        }
    }
    return full_match;
};
0

Here is generic equality checker function that receives array of elements as input and compare them to each other. Works with all types of elements.

const isEqual = function(inputs = []) {
  // Checks an element if js object.
  const isObject = function(data) {
    return Object.prototype.toString.call(data) === '[object Object]';
  };
  // Sorts given object by its keys.
  const sortObjectByKey = function(obj) {
    const self = this;
    if (!obj) return {};
    return Object.keys(obj).sort().reduce((initialVal, item) => {
      initialVal[item] = !Array.isArray(obj[item]) &&
        typeof obj[item] === 'object'
        ? self.objectByKey(obj[item])
        : obj[item];
      return initialVal;
    }, {});
  };

  // Checks equality of all elements in the input against each other. Returns true | false
  return (
    inputs
      .map(
        input =>
          typeof input == 'undefined'
            ? ''
            : isObject(input)
                ? JSON.stringify(sortObjectByKey(input))
                : JSON.stringify(input)
      )
      .reduce(
        (prevValue, input) =>
          prevValue === '' || prevValue === input ? input : false,
        ''
      ) !== false
  );
};

// Tests (Made with Jest test framework.)
test('String equality check', () => {
  expect(isEqual(['murat'])).toEqual(true);
  expect(isEqual(['murat', 'john', 'doe'])).toEqual(false);
  expect(isEqual(['murat', 'murat', 'murat'])).toEqual(true);
});

test('Float equality check', () => {
  expect(isEqual([7.89, 3.45])).toEqual(false);
  expect(isEqual([7, 7.50])).toEqual(false);
  expect(isEqual([7.50, 7.50])).toEqual(true);
  expect(isEqual([7, 7])).toEqual(true);
  expect(isEqual([0.34, 0.33])).toEqual(false);
  expect(isEqual([0.33, 0.33])).toEqual(true);
});

test('Array equality check', () => {
  expect(isEqual([[1, 2, 3], [1, 2, 3]])).toEqual(true);
  expect(isEqual([[1, 3], [1, 2, 3]])).toEqual(false);
  expect(isEqual([['murat', 18], ['murat', 18]])).toEqual(true);
});

test('Object equality check', () => {
  let obj1 = {
    name: 'murat',
    age: 18
  };
  let obj2 = {
    name: 'murat',
    age: 18
  };
  let obj3 = {
    age: 18,
    name: 'murat'
  };
  let obj4 = {
    name: 'murat',
    age: 18,
    occupation: 'nothing'
  };
  expect(isEqual([obj1, obj2])).toEqual(true);
  expect(isEqual([obj1, obj2, obj3])).toEqual(true);
  expect(isEqual([obj1, obj2, obj3, obj4])).toEqual(false);
});

test('Weird equality checks', () => {
  expect(isEqual(['', {}])).toEqual(false);
  expect(isEqual([0, '0'])).toEqual(false);
});

There is also a gist

0

I've implemented a method that takes two jsons and checks to see if their keys have the same values using recursion. I used another question to solve this.

const arraysEqual = (a, b) => {
    if (a === b)
        return true;
    if (a === null || b === null)
        return false;
    if (a.length !== b.length)
        return false;

    // If you don't care about the order of the elements inside
    // the array, you should sort both arrays here.

    for (let i = 0; i < a.length; ++i) {
        if (a[i] !== b[i])
            return false;
    }
    return true;
};

const jsonsEqual = (a, b) => {

  if(typeof a !== 'object' || typeof b !== 'object')
      return false;

  if (Object.keys(a).length === Object.keys(b).length) { // if items have the same size
      let response = true;

      for (let key in a) {
          if (!b[key]) // if not key
              response = false;
          if (typeof a[key] !== typeof b[key]) // if typeof doesn't equals
              response = false;
          else {
              if (Array.isArray(a[key])) // if array
                  response = arraysEqual(a[key], b[key]);
              else if (typeof a[key] === 'object') // if another json
                  response = jsonsEqual(a[key], b[key]);
              else if (a[key] !== b[key])  // not equals
                  response = false;
          }
          if (!response) // return if one item isn't equal
              return false;
      }
  } else
      return false;

  return true;
};

const json1 = { 
  a: 'a', 
  b: 'asd', 
  c: [
    '1',
    2,
    2.5,
    '3', 
    {
      d: 'asd',
      e: [
        1.6,
        { 
          f: 'asdasd',
          g: '123'
        }
      ]
    }
  ],
  h: 1,
  i: 1.2,
};

const json2 = {
  a: 'nops',
  b: 'asd'
};

const json3 = { 
  a: 'h', 
  b: '484', 
  c: [
    3,
    4.5,
    '2ss', 
    {
      e: [
        { 
          f: 'asdasd',
          g: '123'
        }
      ]
    }
  ],
  h: 1,
  i: 1.2,
};

const result = jsonsEqual(json1,json2);
//const result = jsonsEqual(json1,json3);
//const result = jsonsEqual(json1,json1);

if(result) // is equal
  $('#result').text("Jsons are the same")
else
  $('#result').text("Jsons aren't equals")
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

<div id="result"></div>

0

Lot's of good thoughts here! Here is my version of deep equal. I posted it on github and wrote some tests around it. It's hard to cover all the possible cases and sometimes it's unnecessary to do so.

I covered NaN !== NaN as well as circular dependencies.

https://github.com/ryancat/simple-deep-equal/blob/master/index.js

0

     let user1 = {
        name: "John",
        address: {
            line1: "55 Green Park Road",
            line2: {
              a:[1,2,3]
            } 
        },
        email:null
        }
    
     let user2 = {
        name: "John",
        address: {
            line1: "55 Green Park Road",
            line2: {
              a:[1,2,3]
            } 
        },
        email:null
         }
    
    // Method 1
    
    function isEqual(a, b) {
          return JSON.stringify(a) === JSON.stringify(b);
    }
    
    // Method 2
    
    function isEqual(a, b) {
      // checking type of a And b
      if(typeof a !== 'object' || typeof b !== 'object') {
        return false;
      }
      
      // Both are NULL
      if(!a && !b ) {
         return true;
      } else if(!a || !b) {
         return false;
      }
      
      let keysA = Object.keys(a);
      let keysB = Object.keys(b);
      if(keysA.length !== keysB.length) {
        return false;
      }
      for(let key in a) {
       if(!(key in b)) {
         return false;
       }
        
       if(typeof a[key] === 'object') {
         if(!isEqual(a[key], b[key]))
           {
             return false;
           }
       } else {
         if(a[key] !== b[key]) {
           return false;
         }
       }
      }
      
      return true;
    }



console.log(isEqual(user1,user2));

0

function isDeepEqual(obj1, obj2, testPrototypes = false) {
  if (obj1 === obj2) {
    return true
  }

  if (typeof obj1 === "function" && typeof obj2 === "function") {
    return obj1.toString() === obj2.toString()
  }

  if (obj1 instanceof Date && obj2 instanceof Date) {
    return obj1.getTime() === obj2.getTime()
  }

  if (
    Object.prototype.toString.call(obj1) !==
      Object.prototype.toString.call(obj2) ||
    typeof obj1 !== "object"
  ) {
    return false
  }

  const prototypesAreEqual = testPrototypes
    ? isDeepEqual(
        Object.getPrototypeOf(obj1),
        Object.getPrototypeOf(obj2),
        true
      )
    : true

  const obj1Props = Object.getOwnPropertyNames(obj1)
  const obj2Props = Object.getOwnPropertyNames(obj2)

  return (
    obj1Props.length === obj2Props.length &&
    prototypesAreEqual &&
    obj1Props.every(prop => isDeepEqual(obj1[prop], obj2[prop]))
  )
}

console.log(isDeepEqual({key: 'one'}, {key: 'first'}))
console.log(isDeepEqual({key: 'one'}, {key: 'one'}))

0

Is this acceptable?

deepEqual = (x, y) => {
 let areEqual = false;
 const Obj = Object.keys(x);
 const keysSize = Obj.length;
 let counter = 0;
 Obj.forEach(key => {
  if (y[key] === x[key]) {
    counter += 1;
  }
 });
 if (counter === keysSize) areEqual = true;
 return areEqual;
};

protected by Neil Lunn Aug 29 '17 at 3:46

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