1

I can't seem to get the custom format right for my TimeSpan.ParseExact():

Time samples to be expected:

1:23:45.6
23:45.6
23:45
1:23:45

The string format I'm using:

string withTenthFormat = @"[%h\:]mm\:ss[\.%f]";

Trying to have hours and fractions of seconds optionally. However using this format and an CultureInfo.InvariantCulture does lead to a FormatException. What am I missing?

8

I'm not aware of the ability to specify optional parts like that in a custom format string. I suggest you use multiple format strings, and use the overload of TimeSpan.ParseExact that takes an array of formats.

string[] formats = { @"h\:mm\:ss\.FFF", @"mm\:ss\.FFF",
                     @"h\:mm\:ss", @"mm\:ss"};
string[] values = { "1:23:45.6", "23:45.6", "23:45", "1:23:45" };

foreach (string value in values)
{
    var parsed = TimeSpan.ParseExact(value, formats,
                                     CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
    Console.WriteLine(parsed);
}

(I'm using FFF as the milliseconds specifier to allow you to express "1:23:45.67" as well. If you only ever want hundreds of milliseconds, F or f would be fine.)

1

I would simply use DateTime.ParseExact instead because it's more powerful:

string[] strings = new[] { "1:23:45.6", "23:45.6", "23:45", "1:23:45" };
string[] formats = new[] { "H:mm:ss.f", "H:mm.f", "H:mm", "H:mm:ss" };
TimeSpan[] timespans = strings
    .Select(str =>
    {
        TimeSpan? ts = null;
        DateTime dt;
        if (DateTime.TryParseExact(str, formats, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, DateTimeStyles.None, out dt))
            ts = dt.TimeOfDay;
        return ts;
    })
    .Where(ts => ts.HasValue)
    .Select(ts => ts.Value)
    .ToArray();

Demonstration

  • 1
    But it's not parsing what you're trying to parse - date and time handling is much simpler when you make sure you're always dealing with the type you're actually interested in. TimeSpan.ParseExact can work fine here. – Jon Skeet Nov 21 '13 at 14:48
  • Point taken. However, i keep the answer to show that you can also parse TimeSpans with DateTime.ParseExact which supports much more formats, is easier to use and is also available below .NET 4. – Tim Schmelter Nov 21 '13 at 15:20
  • 1
    So long as you want to parse a value of less than 24 hours, of course. If you want to allow days it becomes trickier. And I agree that TimeSpan parsing in .NET is more finicky than it really should be. – Jon Skeet Nov 21 '13 at 15:22

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