291

I just switched to PyCharm and I am very happy about all the warnings and hints it provides me to improve my code. Except for this one which I don't understand:

This inspection detects shadowing names defined in outer scopes.

I know it is bad practice to access variable from the outer scope, but what is the problem with shadowing the outer scope?

Here is one example, where PyCharm gives me the warning message:

data = [4, 5, 6]

def print_data(data): # <-- Warning: "Shadows 'data' from outer scope
    print data

print_data(data)
2
  • 1
    Also I searched for the string "This inspection detects..." but found nothing in the pycharm online help: jetbrains.com/pycharm/webhelp/getting-help.html
    – Framester
    Nov 21, 2013 at 15:39
  • 3
    To turn off this message in PyCharm: <Ctrl>+<Alt>+s (settings), Editor, Inspections, "Shadowing names from outer scopes". Uncheck.
    – ChaimG
    Jan 23, 2019 at 17:33

10 Answers 10

289

There isn't any big deal in your above snippet, but imagine a function with a few more arguments and quite a few more lines of code. Then you decide to rename your data argument as yadda, but miss one of the places it is used in the function's body... Now data refers to the global, and you start having weird behaviour - where you would have a much more obvious NameError if you didn't have a global name data.

Also remember that in Python everything is an object (including modules, classes and functions), so there's no distinct namespaces for functions, modules or classes. Another scenario is that you import function foo at the top of your module, and use it somewhere in your function body. Then you add a new argument to your function and named it - bad luck - foo.

Finally, built-in functions and types also live in the same namespace and can be shadowed the same way.

None of this is much of a problem if you have short functions, good naming and a decent unit test coverage, but well, sometimes you have to maintain less than perfect code and being warned about such possible issues might help.

5
  • 41
    Fortunately PyCharm (as used by the OP) has a very nice rename operation that renames the variable everywhere it is used in the same scope, which makes renaming errors less likely.
    – wojtow
    Apr 6, 2017 at 0:29
  • 2
    In addition to PyCharm's renaming operation I would love to have special syntax highlights for variables that refer to outer scope. These two should render this time consuming shadow resolution game irrelevant.
    – Leo
    Jul 25, 2019 at 13:46
  • Side note: You can use the nonlocal keyword to make outer score referring (like in closures) explicit. Note that this is different from shadowing, as it explicitly does not shadow variables from outside.
    – Felix D.
    Oct 7, 2019 at 8:21
  • I believe this is not the right answer and does not propose a solution. I believe this should be the answer: stackoverflow.com/a/40008745/2424587 Jan 25 at 15:50
  • @HananShteingart I already commented on why what you believe should be the answer is not, and it's also part of my own answer. Jan 27 at 17:59
232

The currently most up-voted and accepted answer and most answers here miss the point.

It doesn't matter how long your function is, or how you name your variable descriptively (to hopefully minimize the chance of potential name collision).

The fact that your function's local variable or its parameter happens to share a name in the global scope is completely irrelevant. And in fact, no matter how carefully you choose you local variable name, your function can never foresee "whether my cool name yadda will also be used as a global variable in future?". The solution? Simply don't worry about that! The correct mindset is to design your function to consume input from and only from its parameters in signature. That way you don't need to care what is (or will be) in global scope, and then shadowing becomes not an issue at all.

In other words, the shadowing problem only matters when your function need to use the same name local variable and the global variable. But you should avoid such design in the first place. The OP's code does not really have such design problem. It is just that PyCharm is not smart enough and it gives out a warning just in case. So, just to make PyCharm happy, and also make our code clean, see this solution quoting from silyevsk's answer to remove the global variable completely.

def print_data(data):
    print data

def main():
    data = [4, 5, 6]
    print_data(data)

main()

This is the proper way to "solve" this problem, by fixing/removing your global thing, not adjusting your current local function.

10
  • 15
    Well, sure, in a perfect world, you enver make a typo, or forget one of your search-replace when you change the parameter, but mistakes happens and that's what PyCharm is saying - "Warning - nothing is technically in error, but this could easily become a problem"
    – dwanderson
    Feb 22, 2017 at 2:19
  • 5
    I wholefully agree on the fact that functions should be as "pure" as possible but you totally miss the two important points: there's no way to restrict Python from looking up a name in the enclosing scopes if it's not locally defined, and everything (modules, functions, classes etc) is an object and lives in the same namespace as any other "variable". In your above snippet, print_data IS a global variable. Think about it... Mar 17, 2017 at 9:07
  • 2
    I ended up on this thread because I'm using functions defined in functions, to make the outer function more readable without cluttering the global namespace or heavy-handedly using separate files. This example here doesn't apply to that general case, of non-local non-global variables being shadowed.
    – micseydel
    Jul 2, 2018 at 22:39
  • 3
    Agree. The problem here is Python scoping. Non explicit access to objects outside the current scope is asking for trouble. Who would want that! A shame because otherwise Python is a pretty well thought out language (not withstanding a similar ambiguity in module naming).
    – CodeCabbie
    May 12, 2020 at 10:21
  • 2
    @florianH , I do not use PyCharm, perhaps you can somehow set a breakpoint at the end of main()?
    – RayLuo
    Jun 5, 2020 at 16:13
52

A good workaround in some cases may be to move the variables and code to another function:

def print_data(data):
    print data

def main():
    data = [4, 5, 6]
    print_data(data)

main()
2
  • 1
    Yes. I think a good ide is able to handle local variables and global variables by refactoring. Your tip really helps to eliminate such potential risks for primitive ide Feb 1, 2017 at 7:11
  • I would not call this a workaround but a better design. Jun 1 at 18:43
7

I like to see a green tick in the top right corner in PyCharm. I append the variable names with an underscore just to clear this warning so I can focus on the important warnings.

data = [4, 5, 6]

def print_data(data_):
    print(data_)

print_data(data)
3
  • 6
    prone to errors when forgetting the _ Sep 20, 2021 at 16:24
  • 2
    I initially upvoted this, and did the same. I'm now reverting code across all of my projects to intentionally shadow the global (when I don't want or need it). I agree with @eyaler, this is extremely error-prone. Sep 20, 2021 at 17:45
  • 2
    # noinspection PyShadowingNames Sep 20, 2021 at 17:49
5

It depends how long the function is. The longer the function, the greater the chance that someone modifying it in future will write data thinking that it means the global. In fact, it means the local, but because the function is so long, it's not obvious to them that there exists a local with that name.

For your example function, I think that shadowing the global is not bad at all.

2

Do this:

data = [4, 5, 6]

def print_data():
    global data
    print(data)

print_data()
1
  • 1. The function has no parameter any more. 2. You do not need to declare a global variable using global if you need only read access. Jun 1 at 18:44
2
data = [4, 5, 6] # Your global variable

def print_data(data): # <-- Pass in a parameter called "data"
    print data  # <-- Note: You can access global variable inside your function, BUT for now, which is which? the parameter or the global variable? Confused, huh?

print_data(data)
5
  • 56
    I for one am not confused. It's pretty obviously the parameter.
    – user395760
    Nov 21, 2013 at 15:42
  • 2
    @delnan You may not be confused in this trivial example, but what if other functions defined nearby used the global data, all deep within a few hundred lines of code? Nov 21, 2013 at 15:48
  • 15
    @HevyLight I don't need to look at other functions nearby. I look at this function only and can see that data is a local name in this function, so I don't even bother checking/remembering whether a global of the same name exists, let alone what it contains.
    – user395760
    Nov 21, 2013 at 15:50
  • 4
    I don't think this reasoning is valid, solely because to use a global, you would need to define "global data" inside of the function. Otherwise, the global is not accessible.
    – CodyF
    Feb 15, 2015 at 19:38
  • 3
    @CodyF False - if you don't define, but just try to use data, it looks up through scopes until it finds one, so it does find the global data. data = [1, 2, 3]; def foo(): print(data); foo()
    – dwanderson
    Feb 22, 2017 at 2:21
2

It looks like it is 100% a pytest code pattern.

See:

pytest fixtures: explicit, modular, scalable

I had the same problem with it, and this is why I found this post ;)

# ./tests/test_twitter1.py
import os
import pytest

from mylib import db
# ...

@pytest.fixture
def twitter():
    twitter_ = db.Twitter()
    twitter_._debug = True
    return twitter_

@pytest.mark.parametrize("query,expected", [
    ("BANCO PROVINCIAL", 8),
    ("name", 6),
    ("castlabs", 42),
])
def test_search(twitter: db.Twitter, query: str, expected: int):

    for query in queries:
        res = twitter.search(query)
        print(res)
        assert res

And it will warn with This inspection detects shadowing names defined in outer scopes.

To fix that, just move your twitter fixture into ./tests/conftest.py

# ./tests/conftest.py
import pytest

from syntropy import db


@pytest.fixture
def twitter():
    twitter_ = db.Twitter()
    twitter_._debug = True
    return twitter_

And remove the twitter fixture, like in ./tests/test_twitter2.py:

# ./tests/test_twitter2.py
import os
import pytest

from mylib import db
# ...

@pytest.mark.parametrize("query,expected", [
    ("BANCO PROVINCIAL", 8),
    ("name", 6),
    ("castlabs", 42),
])
def test_search(twitter: db.Twitter, query: str, expected: int):

    for query in queries:
        res = twitter.search(query)
        print(res)
        assert res

This will be make happy for QA, PyCharm and everyone.

0

To ignore the warning, as Chistopher said in a comment, you can comment above it

# noinspection PyShadowingNames
0

I think this rule doesn't help much. I simply disabled it by going to Settings -> Editor -> Inspections and then checking off this rule:

Shadowing names from outer scope

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