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I was thinking of using TIMESTAMP to store the date+time, but I read that there is a limitation of year 2038 on it. Instead of asking my question in bulk, I preferred to break it up into small parts so that it is easy for novice users to understand as well. So my question(s):

  1. What exactly is the Year 2038 problem?
  2. Why does it occur and what happens when it occurs?
  3. How do we solve it?
  4. Are there any possible alternatives to using it, which do not pose a similar problem?
  5. What can we do to the existing applications that use TIMESTAMP, to avoid the so-called problem, when it really occurs?

Thanks in advance.

  • 1
    That is still 28 years to go. Are you still using any computer related technology from 1982? Unlikely. So don't worry, because by 2038 it likely won't be an issue anymore. – Gordon Jan 6 '10 at 11:54
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    Gordon, I make an application that does forecasting. I save how much money I have each month, and can then estimate when I will be a millionaire. In my case, 28 years is not that much, and I'm sure I'm not the only one who have this problem right now (I solved it by using 64-bit numbers to represent the timestamp). – Emil Vikström Jan 6 '10 at 12:00
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    @Emil By using 64bit integers right now, you have found yourself an easy solution to a concrete problem. Not applicable to (or needed by) everyone, but working for your usecase. Point is, if the OP does not have a concrete problem, like forecasting, then this is might be an interesting topic, but nothing he should worry about, because solving this on a general level is not a PHP (mind the tag) issue. Just my 2c. – Gordon Jan 6 '10 at 12:14
  • @Emil: May I ask you, how exactly you used '64-bit numbers' to represent the timestamp ? What change would one need to do to their present table structure to make it so? Or what would they need to do, if they are creating the TIMESTAMP for the first time? Thanks. – Devner Jan 6 '10 at 12:20
  • By 2038, parsing the string "YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS:mmmm..." will be the cheapest operation you can dream of. By 2038, 32 Bit will be obsolete. I doubt the Unix timestamp as we know it will exist then, and if it does, our 256 Bit systems will handle dates that reach far beyond the age where 4096 bit systems are given out in happy meals. – Super Cat Sep 5 '16 at 21:55
123

I have marked this as a community wiki so feel free to edit at your leisure.

What exactly is the Year 2038 problem?

"The year 2038 problem (also known as Unix Millennium Bug, Y2K38 by analogy to the Y2K problem) may cause some computer software to fail before or in the year 2038. The problem affects all software and systems that store system time as a signed 32-bit integer, and interpret this number as the number of seconds since 00:00:00 UTC on January 1, 1970."


Why does it occur and what happens when it occurs?

Times beyond 03:14:07 UTC on Tuesday, 19 January 2038 will 'wrap around' and be stored internally as a negative number, which these systems will interpret as a time in December 13, 1901 rather than in 2038. This is due to the fact that the number of seconds since the UNIX epoch (January 1 1970 00:00:00 GMT) will have exceeded a computer's maximum value for a 32-bit signed integer.


How do we solve it?

  • Use long data types (64 bits is sufficient)
  • For MySQL (or MariaDB), if you don't need the time information consider using the DATE column type. If you need higher accuracy, use DATETIME rather than TIMESTAMP. Beware that DATETIME columns do not store information about the timezone, so your application will have to know which timezone was used.
  • Other Possible solutions described on Wikipedia
  • Wait for MySQL devs to fix this bug reported over a decade ago.

Are there any possible alternatives to using it, which do not pose a similar problem?

Try wherever possible to use large types for storing dates in databases: 64-bits is sufficient - a long long type in GNU C and POSIX/SuS, or sprintf('%u'...) in PHP or the BCmath extension.


What are some potentially breaking use cases even though we're not yet in 2038?

So a MySQL DATETIME has a range of 1000-9999, but TIMESTAMP only has a range of 1970-2038. If your system stores birthdates, future forward dates (e.g. 30 year mortgages), or similar, you're already going to run into this bug. Again, don't use TIMESTAMP if this is going to be a problem.


What can we do to the existing applications that use TIMESTAMP, to avoid the so-called problem, when it really occurs?

Few PHP applications will still be around in 2038, though it's hard to foresee as the web hardly a legacy platform yet.

Here is a process for altering a database table column to convert TIMESTAMP to DATETIME. It starts with creating a temporary column:

# rename the old TIMESTAMP field
ALTER TABLE `myTable` CHANGE `myTimestamp` `temp_myTimestamp` int(11) NOT NULL;

# create a new DATETIME column of the same name as your old column
ALTER TABLE `myTable` ADD `myTimestamp` DATETIME NOT NULL;

# update all rows by populating your new DATETIME field
UPDATE `myTable` SET `myTimestamp` = FROM_UNIXTIME(temp_myTimestamp);

# remove the temporary column
ALTER TABLE `myTable` DROP `temp_myTimestamp`

Resources

  • 2
    Awesome. To me, your answer is the most complete. Thanks much. – Devner Jan 6 '10 at 12:29
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    In MySQL, if future version changes the underlying storage data type of TIMESTAMP to 64-bit, then there is no need to change your code to DATETIME, right? I just don't think discouraging anyone from using TIMESTAMP is the right thing to do because that data type does have its purpose. – pixelfreak Jan 4 '13 at 23:56
  • MySQL's signed BIGINT field seems like it would work fine for storing timestamps and I've done some local testing on MySQL 5.5 which confirms it works. Obviously using signed would be better than unsigned as you can represent dates in the past as well. Any reason not to use BIGINT for timestamps? – zuallauz Jan 19 '13 at 2:40
  • One thing to note, MySQL only has auto setting to current date/time (CURRENT_TIMESTAMP) for timestamp fields. Hopefully, this functionality will eventually port to all date types. – Ray Jun 20 '13 at 20:52
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    It is absolutely absurd that MySQL (and MariaDB) don't use 64 bit integers to store timestamps on 64 bit systems. Using DATETIME is not an adequate solution because we have no idea about time zone. This was reported way back in 2005, but still no fix is available. – Mike Jan 7 '17 at 4:21
12

When using UNIX Timestamps to store dates, you are actually using a 32 bits integers, that keeps count of the number of seconds since 1970-01-01 ; see Unix Time

That 32 bits number will overflow in 2038. That's the 2038 problem.


To solve that problem, you must not use a 32 bits UNIX timestamp to store your dates -- which means, when using MySQL, you should not use TIMESTAMP, but DATETIME (see 10.3.1. The DATETIME, DATE, and TIMESTAMP Types) :

The DATETIME type is used when you need values that contain both date and time information. The supported range is '1000-01-01 00:00:00' to '9999-12-31 23:59:59'.

The TIMESTAMP data type has a range of '1970-01-01 00:00:01' UTC to '2038-01-19 03:14:07' UTC.


The (probably) best thing you can do to your application to avoid/fix that problem is to not use TIMESTAMP, but DATETIME for the columns that have to contain dates that are not between 1970 and 2038.

One small note, though : there is a very high probably (statistically speaking) that your application will have been re-written quite a couple of times before 2038 ^^ So maybe, if you don't have to deal with dates in the future, you won't have to take care of that problem with the current version of your application...

  • 1
    +1 For the info. The attempt here is to adapt best practices right from start so that one does not have to worry about the problem later on. So although for now 2038 may not sound like an issue, I just want to follow the best practices and follow it for each & every application that I create, right from the start. Hope that makes sense. – Devner Jan 6 '10 at 12:28
  • Yes, it makes sense, I see your point. But "best practice" can also mean "what answers the need" -- If you know a timestamp will be enough, there is no need to use a datetime (those need more memory to be stored, for instance ; and that can matter if you have millions of records) ;; I have some applications in which I use timestamp for some columns (columns that contain current date, for instance), and datetime for some others (columns that contain past/future dates, for instance) – Pascal MARTIN Jan 6 '10 at 12:36
  • I see your procedure also makes sense and works well especially when concerning storage space. If it's alright, may I ask you what structure and length you use generally for the TIMESTAMP column in your applications? Thanks. – Devner Jan 6 '10 at 13:47
  • Well, when I want to use a TIMESTAMP, it's for/because my "date/time" data fits between 1970 and 2038 -- and, so, I use the MySQL TIMESTAMP data type. – Pascal MARTIN Jan 6 '10 at 16:52
  • Thanks for the info. From your response, I understand that it's enough to just declare the column as TIMESTAMP and we need not provide any length for it(unlike and int or var, where we provide the length). Am I right? – Devner Jan 6 '10 at 19:41
7

A quick search on Google will do the trick: Year 2038 problem

  1. The year 2038 problem (also known as Unix Millennium Bug, Y2K38 by analogy to the Y2K problem) may cause some computer software to fail before or in the year 2038
  2. The problem affects all software and systems that store system time as a signed 32-bit integer, and interpret this number as the number of seconds since 00:00:00 UTC on January 1, 1970. The latest time that can be represented this way is 03:14:07 UTC on Tuesday, 19 January 2038. Times beyond this moment will "wrap around" and be stored internally as a negative number, which these systems will interpret as a date in 1901 rather than 2038
  3. There is no easy fix for this problem for existing CPU/OS combinations, existing file systems, or existing binary data formats
2

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Year_2038_problem has most of the details

In summary:

1) + 2) The problem is that many systems store date info as a 32-bit signed int equal to the number of seconds since 1/1/1970. The latest date that can be stored like this is 03:14:07 UTC on Tuesday, 19 January 2038. When this happens the int will "wrap around" and be stored as a negative number which will be interpreted as a date in 1901. What exactly will happen then, varies from system to system but suffice to say it probably won't be good for any of them!

For systems that only store dates in the past, then I guess you don't need to worry for a while! The main problem is with systems that work with dates in the future. If your system needs to work with dates 28 years in the future then you should start worrying now!

3) Use one of the alternative date formats available or move to a 64-bit system and use 64-bit ints. Or for databases use an alternative time stamp format (eg for MySQL use DATETIME)

4) See 3!

5) See 4!!! ;)

  • Your points 4 & 5 remind me of 'Call by Reference'. That put a smile on my face. Thanks & +1 for the same. – Devner Jan 6 '10 at 12:32
1

Bros, if you need to use PHP to display timestamps, this is the BEST PHP solution without changing from UNIX_TIMESTAMP format.

Use a custom_date() function. Inside it, use the DateTime. Here's the DateTime solution.

As long as you have UNSIGNED BIGINT(8) as your timestamps in database. As long as you have PHP 5.2.0 ++

-1

As I did't want to upgrade anything, I asked my backend (MSSQL) to do this job instead of PHP!

$qry = "select DATEADD(month, 1, :date) next_date ";
$rs_tmp = $pdo->prepare($qry);
$rs_tmp->bindValue(":date", '2038/01/15');
$rs_tmp->execute();
$row_tmp = $rs_tmp->fetch(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC);

echo $row_tmp['next_date'];

May not be an efficient way, but it works.

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