41

As a silly toy example, suppose

x=4.5
w=c(1,2,4,6,7)

I wonder if there is a simple R function that finds the index of the closest match to x in w. So if foo is that function, foo(w,x) would return 3. The function match is the right idea, but seems to apply only for exact matches.

Solutions here (e.g. which.min(abs(w - x)), which(abs(w-x)==min(abs(w-x))), etc.) are all O(n) instead of log(n) (I'm assuming that w is already sorted).

40

You can use data.table to do a binary search:

dt = data.table(w, val = w) # you'll see why val is needed in a sec
setattr(dt, "sorted", "w")  # let data.table know that w is sorted

Note that if the column w isn't already sorted, then you'll have to use setkey(dt, w) instead of setattr(.).

# binary search and "roll" to the nearest neighbour
dt[J(x), roll = "nearest"]
#     w val
#1: 4.5   4

In the final expression the val column will have the you're looking for.

# or to get the index as Josh points out
# (and then you don't need the val column):
dt[J(x), .I, roll = "nearest", by = .EACHI]
#     w .I
#1: 4.5  3

# or to get the index alone
dt[J(x), roll = "nearest", which = TRUE]
#[1] 3
  • 3
    I had a similar thought, but given that the OP wants the vector's index, would have done: dt = data.table(w, key="w"); dt[J(x), .I,roll = "nearest"][[2]] – Josh O'Brien Nov 21 '13 at 22:52
  • 1
    @Arun -- So doing attributes(dt) <- c(attributes(dt), sorted="w") is not only hacky but ineffective! Sounds like good software design on the part of the data.table team. – Josh O'Brien Nov 21 '13 at 23:05
  • 1
    Hmm, it does seem like is.unsorted is not called unless the "attribute" is set. I wonder why.. I think there's speedup possible here. Will check. – Arun Nov 21 '13 at 23:21
  • 1
    What is J in J(x) in dt[J(x), roll = "nearest"]? – Conner M. Oct 6 '17 at 20:51
  • 1
    @ConnerM. it's a shortcut for data.table. Nowadays you can also use . instead of J. – eddi Oct 6 '17 at 21:51
35
R>findInterval(4.5, c(1,2,4,5,6))
[1] 3

will do that with price-is-right matching (closest without going over).

  • findInterval {base} Find Interval Numbers or Indices stat.ethz.ch/R-manual/R-devel/library/base/html/… – Ken Lin Aug 12 '15 at 17:13
  • 1
    To get the nearest element using this approach you can do search in intervals from mid points between adjacent target points: w[findInterval(x, (w[-length(w)] + w[-1]) / 2) + 1] – Gedrox Dec 1 '16 at 7:24
  • 1
    @Gedrox That should work, but its O(n) instead of O(log n) because of the midpoint calculation. – Neal Fultz Dec 22 '16 at 8:12
  • @NealFultz, you're right. For performance simple "if" check for the distance to the next point is enough. if (res == 0 || (res != length(w) && w[res + 1] - x < x - w[res])) res <- res + 1 – Gedrox Dec 22 '16 at 9:13
6

See match.closest() from the MALDIquant package:

> library(MALDIquant)
> match.closest(x, w)
[1] 3
3

To do this on character vectors, Martin Morgan suggested this function on R-help:

bsearch7 <-
     function(val, tab, L=1L, H=length(tab))
{
     b <- cbind(L=rep(L, length(val)), H=rep(H, length(val)))
     i0 <- seq_along(val)
     repeat {
         updt <- M <- b[i0,"L"] + (b[i0,"H"] - b[i0,"L"]) %/% 2L
         tabM <- tab[M]
         val0 <- val[i0]
         i <- tabM < val0
         updt[i] <- M[i] + 1L
         i <- tabM > val0
         updt[i] <- M[i] - 1L
         b[i0 + i * length(val)] <- updt
         i0 <- which(b[i0, "H"] >= b[i0, "L"])
         if (!length(i0)) break;
     }
     b[,"L"] - 1L
} 
2
x = 4.5
w = c(1,2,4,6,7)

closestLoc = which(min(abs(w-x)))
closestVal = w[which(min(abs(w-x)))]

# On my phone- please pardon typos

If your vector is lengthy, try a 2-step approach:

x = 4.5
w = c(1,2,4,6,7)

sdev = sapply(w,function(v,x) abs(v-x), x = x)
closestLoc = which(min(sdev))

for maddeningly long vectors (millions of rows!, warning- this will actually be slower for data which is not very, very, very large.)

require(doMC)
registerDoMC()

closestLoc = which(min(foreach(i = w) %dopar% {
   abs(i-x)
}))

This example is just to give you a basic idea of leveraging parallel processing when you have huge data. Note, I do not recommend you use it for simple & fast functions like abs().

  • 1
    See edited question: OP wants something faster than this. – Josh O'Brien Nov 21 '13 at 22:45
  • 1
    Just saw. data.table is the way to go! – jackStinger Nov 21 '13 at 22:54
1
NearestValueSearch = function(x, w){
  ## A simple binary search algo
  ## Assume the w vector is sorted so we can use binary search
  left = 1
  right = length(w)
  while(right - left > 1){
    middle = floor((left + right) / 2)
    if(x < w[middle]){
      right = middle
    }
    else{
      left = middle
    }
  }
  if(abs(x - w[right]) < abs(x - w[left])){
    return(right)
  }
  else{
    return(left)
  }
}


x = 4.5
w = c(1,2,4,6,7)
NearestValueSearch(x, w) # return 3
-2

You can always implement custom binary search algorithm to find the closest value. Alternately, you can leverage standard implementation of libc bsearch(). You can use other binary search implementations as well, but it does not change the fact that you have to implement the comparing function carefully to find the closest element in array. The issue with standard binary search implementation is that it is meant for exact comparison. That means your improvised comparing function needs to do some kind of exactification to figure out if an element in array is close-enough. To achieve it, the comparing function needs to have awareness of other elements in the array, especially following aspects:

  • position of the current element (one which is being compared with the key).
  • the distance with key and how it compares with neighbors (previous or next element).

To provide this extra knowledge in comparing function, the key needs to be packaged with additional information (not just the key value). Once the comparing function have awareness on these aspects, it can figure out if the element itself is closest. When it knows that it is the closest, it returns "match".

The the following C code finds the closest value.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

struct key {
        int key_val;
        int *array_head;
        int array_size;
};

int compar(const void *k, const void *e) {
        struct key *key = (struct key*)k;
        int *elem = (int*)e;
        int *arr_first = key->array_head;
        int *arr_last = key->array_head + key->array_size -1;
        int kv = key->key_val;
        int dist_left;
        int dist_right;

        if (kv == *elem) {
                /* easy case: if both same, got to be closest */
                return 0;
        } else if (key->array_size == 1) {
                /* easy case: only element got to be closest */
                return 0;
        } else if (elem == arr_first) {
                /* element is the first in array */
                if (kv < *elem) {
                        /* if keyval is less the first element then
                         * first elem is closest.
                         */
                        return 0;
                } else {
                        /* check distance between first and 2nd elem.
                         * if distance with first elem is smaller, it is closest.
                         */
                        dist_left = kv - *elem;
                        dist_right = *(elem+1) - kv;
                        return (dist_left <= dist_right) ? 0:1;
                }
        } else if (elem == arr_last) {
                /* element is the last in array */
                if (kv > *elem) {
                        /* if keyval is larger than the last element then
                         * last elem is closest.
                         */
                        return 0;
                } else {
                        /* check distance between last and last-but-one.
                         * if distance with last elem is smaller, it is closest.
                         */
                        dist_left = kv - *(elem-1);
                        dist_right = *elem - kv;
                        return (dist_right <= dist_left) ? 0:-1;
                }
        }

        /* condition for remaining cases (other cases are handled already):
         * - elem is neither first or last in the array
         * - array has atleast three elements.
         */

        if (kv < *elem) {
                /* keyval is smaller than elem */

                if (kv <= *(elem -1)) {
                        /* keyval is smaller than previous (of "elem") too.
                         * hence, elem cannot be closest.
                         */
                        return -1;
                } else {
                        /* check distance between elem and elem-prev.
                         * if distance with elem is smaller, it is closest.
                         */
                        dist_left = kv - *(elem -1);
                        dist_right = *elem - kv;
                        return (dist_right <= dist_left) ? 0:-1;
                }
        }

        /* remaining case: (keyval > *elem) */

        if (kv >= *(elem+1)) {
                /* keyval is larger than next (of "elem") too.
                 * hence, elem cannot be closest.
                 */
                return 1;
        }

        /* check distance between elem and elem-next.
         * if distance with elem is smaller, it is closest.
         */
        dist_right = *(elem+1) - kv;
        dist_left = kv - *elem;
        return (dist_left <= dist_right) ? 0:1;
}


int main(int argc, char **argv) {
        int arr[] = {10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70};
        int *found;
        struct key k;

        if (argc < 2) {
                return 1;
        }

        k.key_val = atoi(argv[1]);
        k.array_head = arr;
        k.array_size = sizeof(arr)/sizeof(int);

        found = (int*)bsearch(&k, arr, sizeof(arr)/sizeof(int), sizeof(int),
                compar);

        if(found) {
                printf("found closest: %d\n", *found);
        } else {
                printf("closest not found. absurd! \n");
        }

        return 0;
}

Needless to say that bsearch() in above example should never fail (unless the array size is zero).

If you implement your own custom binary search, essentially you have to embed same comparing logic in the main body of binary search code (instead of having this logic in comparing function in above example).

  • In addition, there are other tricks can be played as well. One of the property of binary search (or other searches as well) is that when search fails, the last comparison fails within the "proximity" of the key. For example, if the key is larger than the last element of the array, the last failed comparison is going to be with the last element. If key within the the range of array, the last two comparisons are going be with the elements located at the left and right sides of the key. If comparison function save distances, you can figure out the closest value even when bsearch() fails. – Pralay May 1 '17 at 19:02
  • 2
    That is a C function, not an R function. – Neal Fultz Jul 13 '17 at 22:42

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