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I learned race condition from text book saying: if two procedures try to access the same variable at the same time, then it means they are racing for the shared resource and this is a race condition. Because the final value of that variable might not be consistent if any of or both of these two procedure writes to the variable at the same time.

Now my question is will this ever happen to nodejs code? I heard nodejs is single threaded. So I figure there will not be "two procedures" do something at the same time.

Thx,

[The Article] https://blog.jcoglan.com/2013/03/30/callbacks-are-imperative-promises-are-functional-nodes-biggest-missed-opportunity/

Has this line:

Multiple concurrent actions can access the same in-memory data, or carry out overlapping sequences of commands against a database or the DOM.

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Now my question is will this ever happen to nodejs code?

Yes, race conditions can occur in a node program. However, the specifics of how they can happen are quite different from how they can happen in a multithreaded language.

I heard nodejs is single threaded. So I figure there will not be "two procedures" do something at the same time.

This is true but it is oversimplified. You can safely do this in node without race conditions.

var string = 'one';
string = string + 42;
string = string + ' a suffix';

That code is all in-memory and node will always run those statements in a single "tick" without any interference, guaranteed.

However, add any I/O into the equation and those assumptions go right out the window. So if you did:

var threeFiles;
fs.read('fileOne', function (error, data) {threeFiles += data;});
fs.read('fileTwo', function (error, data) {threeFiles += data;});
fs.read('fileThree', function (error, data) {threeFiles += data;});

That would be a total race condition and threeFiles could easily be out of order and another event stack within node could easily access the threeFiles variable in an intermediate state.

Absolutely node does not have a built-in mechanism to avoid all race conditions. However, it does provide a different approach to concurrency that some people find easier to master when compared to threads, semaphores, locks, deadlocks, etc.

Concurrency is hard in general. Blocking plus threads is available in many mainstream languages. It has pros and cons. Node takes the event loop plus async IO approach and that has its separate challenges and benefits. golang uses a different set of fundamental techniques entirely (channels, goroutines, etc). There are a bunch of other approaches as well as you get into more esoteric and specialized languages. It's still somewhat easy to write buggy programs in all of these paradigms and nothing is a panacea.

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