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So, this is a question I've been given in an assignment:

Write a function, majority(a), that returns a value in a that occurs at least len(a)//2 + 1 times. If no such element exists in a, then this function returns None.

The idea in the assignment is to come up with the fastest way possible.

My idea was keeping a dictionary with a count of each element, and then looping through the dictionary to see if any elements have a count of len(a)//2 +1.

But that didn't seem to work great. Can someone give me a better solution and explain it to me? For some reason this is driving me wild.

This was my poorly structured code:

numTimes = dict()

target = (len(a)//2)+1
for i in range(0, len(a)):
    numTimes[str(a[i])] += 1

for k, v in numTimes.iteritems():
    if v==str(target):
        return v

return None

What drove me wild by the way, was getting a key error when I tried adding a new dictionary element, although this has nothing to do with the question.

  • interesting question! could you provide an example of your dictionary?It's hard to answer a question dealing with a data construct without knowing how the data are structured. – rickcnagy Nov 22 '13 at 3:22
  • Added the code. – user2417731 Nov 22 '13 at 3:28
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    Why are you testing to see if the count as a number is equal to the target as a string? – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Nov 22 '13 at 3:37
  • What version of Python are you using? 2.7 and 3.x have a collections.Counter class that could simplify this if your assignment doesn't forbid it. Which it would if I were writing the assignment, since that class makes this utterly trivial. – Peter DeGlopper Nov 22 '13 at 3:45
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I would use Counter from collections library. It's a subclass of dict.

from collections import Counter

def majority(iterable):
    c = Counter(iterable)
    value, count = c.most_common(1)[0]
    target = (len(iterable)//2) + 1
    if (count >= target):
        return value
    else:
        return None
  • I'm not allowed to use any libraries. – user2417731 Nov 22 '13 at 13:49
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First, consider that len(list)//2+1 means that the element in question would need to be the majority of the list. There could only be one value or no values that satisfy this.

Your sense of using a dictionary is correct. You can map the value of each element to the count of each element. If any element's count is greater than len(list)//2+1 that is your answer.

Here is the easiest way to count elements in a list (at least without using a library):

def majority(li):
    ''' test list li if any single element occurs in li more than len(li)//2+1 times '''
    count=dict()
    tgt=len(li)//2+1
    # count each element in li:
    for key in li:
        if key in count:
            count[key]+=1
        else:
            count[key]=1    

    print count 
    for k, v in count.items():
        if v>=tgt:
            return k     

    return None   

Notice two things. Since you will eventually set every value of li to 0, you can simplify that part to using the fromkeys() method with a set to set them all at once:

count={}.fromkeys(set(li),0)

You can also look to see if you gotten a majority as you are adding up the elements:

def majority2(li):
    ''' test list li if any single element occurs in li more than len(li)//2+1 times '''
    count={}.fromkeys(set(li),0)
    tgt=len(li)//2+1
    # count each element in li:
    for key in li:
        count[key]+=1 
        if count[key]>=tgt:
            return key
    return None     

Testing:

>>> a=['1']*10+['2']*11
>>> majority(a)
{'1': 10, '2': 11}
'2'
>>> majority2(a)
'2'
>>> a=['1']*10+['2']*10
>>> majority2(a)
None
  • (Downvote was for style, unspecific variable names, lack of comments.) – stalepretzel Nov 22 '13 at 7:13
  • @stalepretzel: You were right. I substantially changed it. Thanks for the constructive feedback. – dawg Nov 22 '13 at 15:58
  • Ah, cool. No longer downvote-worthy, downvote removed! :) While we're on the topic of style, I should probably plug PEP 8 (python.org/dev/peps/pep-0008). – stalepretzel Dec 27 '13 at 22:37
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I found the most efficient way was this:

numTimes = dict()
target = (len(a)//2)+1

for ele in a:
    if ele not in numTimes:
        numTimes[ele] = 1
    else:
        numTimes[ele] +=1

    if numTimes[ele] == target:
        return ele

When we are adding, we can check if the number of times is equal to our target midpoint.

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