3

I have an express web app. And within the app, I have a route that makes several calls to the database. During each call, if it fails, then I am redirecting the browser to a page /temporarily-unavailable (basically a generic error page that doesn't freak the user out, just says try back later).

PORTION OF PSEUDO-CODE

app.get('/sign-in/twitter', function(req, res, next){
    request({
        'method' : 'GET',
        // BLAH BLAH BLAH CALL TO DATABASE
        // DATABASE CALLBACK
        function (error, response, body){
            if (response.statusCode === 200) {
                // DO GOOD STUFF
            }
            else if (response.statusCode === 404) {
                // DO COOL STUFF
            }
            else {
                temporarilyUnavailable(req, res, next);
            }
            // DO MORE STUFF AND SEND A RESPONSE
        }
    }
}

PORTION OF PSEUDO-CODE FOR TEMPORARILY UNAVAILABLE FUNCTION

res.set({
    'Cache-Control' : 'private, no-cache, no-store, must-revalidate,
    'Content-Type' : 'text/plain;charset=utf-8',
}

res.redirect(302, 'https://' + req.host + '/' + url);

Shoudn't the res.redirect in the TEMPORARILY UNAVAILABLE FUNCTION prevent any code further down from being executed?

12

No, it shouldn't.

You're simply calling a function on the response. Code below it can execute. There is nothing magical about res.redirect().

A common practice to avoid this is to simply return when you redirect or otherwise call a callback where you want to exit the current function:

return res.redirect(302, 'https://' + req.host + '/' + url);
  • What about something like res.end() ? I guess I am looking for something similar to next() that basically halts all further action with the request. – Justin Cloud Nov 22 '13 at 4:40
  • @JustinCloud next() doesn't halt anything. Code can run after it as well. – Brad Nov 22 '13 at 4:44
  • Yes, but doesn't next() exit the current route and move on to the next routes? – Justin Cloud Nov 22 '13 at 4:56
  • 3
    @JustinCloud Calling the next() function doesn't exit anything, just as calling any other callback or function wouldn't. It's also good practice to return after (or with) next() as well. return next() – Brad Nov 22 '13 at 16:39
  • 2
    @JustinCloud The benefit is that you exit out of the current function, like you are expecting. – Brad Nov 23 '13 at 2:42

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