12

I was just following this article on how to avoid memory leaks : android developer blog Following is the code snippet used :

private static Drawable sBackground;

@Override
protected void onCreate(Bundle state) {
  super.onCreate(state);

  TextView label = new TextView(this);
  label.setText("Leaks are bad");

  if (sBackground == null) {
    sBackground = getDrawable(R.drawable.large_bitmap);
  }
  label.setBackgroundDrawable(sBackground);

  setContentView(label);
}

It is said that the drawable has a callback reference to textview (and indirectly to the activity); which will be preserved on rotation - and hence memory leak.

My query is that won't the drawable's callback be reset on rotation - it would get hold of the new textview (which will hold the new context).. hence allowing the previous instances of textview/context to be GC'ed.

EDIT : The answers I get are on how to "solve" the issue - I am not looking for that ! Please re-read the query. I am adding more details. When activity is launched, the references are :

Drawable1 -> TextView1 -> Activity1

When rotated, Activity1 and TextView1 are destroyed but not Drawable1

Drawable1 -> TextView2 -> Activity2

This means, Activity1 and TextView1 are free to be GC'ed - as no other object is having a reference to them. So what is leaking ?

Am I wrong in this understanding ? Or is it that the Drawable can have multiple views as callbacks ? (Looking at the source code, I dont see a list of callbacks on Drawable).

5
  • If you don't change your layout on rotation it is a good thing to consider handling rotation differently: without activity re-creation (it is possible). So this will solve your trouble. Another thing with memory leaks, is that anyway it is worth to remove background drawable in onDestroy.
    – Alexey A.
    Nov 22, 2013 at 10:03
  • Thanks, but I am concerned with why the leak is happening in the first case. I understand how to solve the problem.
    – dev
    Nov 22, 2013 at 22:43
  • On rotation activity is "re-created", so your previous view/image are connected with previous Activiy context - so you have a memory leak. if you clean up in onDestroy() it will solve the issue
    – Alexey A.
    Nov 23, 2013 at 10:33
  • @AlexeyA. What prevents the previous view to be GCed ?
    – dev
    Nov 23, 2013 at 17:52
  • The reference of the TextView1 to Context of Activity1 prevents Activity1 and all related stuff to be collected.
    – Alexey A.
    Nov 23, 2013 at 17:59

1 Answer 1

9

If you rotate the device, the same MyActivity class (or whatever name you gave it) is recreated, the callback is overwritten and the leak exists until the next GC. The problem lies when you navigate to another activity, keeping a reference to the old one. Today, this is mitigated because the setCallback now stores the callback in a WeakReference as you can see in current Drawable code, but it was a strong reference once (search for setCallback(Callback cb)). Anyway, you're right, if you just look into one activity, the callback will be reset after rotating.

(edit, paragraph added): For example: MainAcivity@1 is the first instance. When you rotate, it's destroyed and a new MainActivity@2 is created. At first, there's a leak, but as soon as sDrawable is reassigned, MainActivity@1 is free to be collected and there's no problem. Now suppose that, instead of rotating, you navigate away to SecondActivity. Now, sDrawable is just for MainActivity and still holds a reference to MainActivity@2, so it leaks.

See this code:

package com.douglasdrumond.leaky;

import android.os.Bundle;
import android.app.Activity;
import android.graphics.drawable.Drawable;
import android.widget.TextView;

public class MainActivity extends Activity {
    private static Drawable sBackground;

    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);

        TextView label = new TextView(this);
        System.gc();
        long memory = Runtime.getRuntime().totalMemory()
                - Runtime.getRuntime().freeMemory();
        label.setText("Memory: " + memory / 1024f);

        if (sBackground == null) {
            sBackground = getResources().getDrawable(R.drawable.large_bitmap);
        }
        label.setBackgroundDrawable(sBackground);

        setContentView(label);
    }

}

Clearly, rotating doesn't increase memory usage.

5
  • Thanks @Douglas, but this doesnt resolve my query. Can you please read the edited query ?
    – dev
    Nov 23, 2013 at 17:18
  • @Raj, I highlighted the sentence when I had agreed with you before and added another paragraph. There's no leak if you stay in the same activity (or, in other words, the leak is temporary), just when you navigate away to another activity. The code isn't for solving the problem, it's for highlighting it. Please read carefully. Nov 24, 2013 at 20:18
  • 1
    Thanks @Douglas Drumond, I did not figure that out !
    – dev
    Nov 24, 2013 at 21:17
  • Good answer, though can you please clear some doubts. Firstly, as you said that Android now has changed the reference to a 'weak' one. Does this mean that the above code becomes correct to use? Or I still have to unbind drawables? Secondly, I couldn't understand 'Now suppose that, instead of rotating, you navigate away to SecondActivity. Now, sDrawable is just for MainActivity and still holds a reference to MainActivity@2, so it leaks.' There was MainActivity@1 and MainActivity@2, so what is MainActivity? Is it the case when I press back button and come to second activity? Thanks. Mar 31, 2016 at 8:38
  • 1) You don't have to unbind drawables, you shouldn't bind them in the first place. It's wrong to hold a static reference to a drawable. Use a member variable and don't worry. 2) MainActivity@1 and @2 are two instances of MainActivity, I used that notation to differentiate them. When you navigate to SecondActivity, sDrawable, which was a variable that only occurred in MainActivity, still holds a reference to the last instance, in this case, MainActivity@2. It won't be cleared in SecondActivity, it will just stay in memory holding resources. Apr 2, 2016 at 22:20

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