3

I have a question on the following issue:

Suppose I have some matrices

A1 <- matrix(runif(rowsA1*T), rowsA1, T)
…
AD <- matrix(runif(rowsAD*T), rowsAD, T)

The number of matrices is variable (but most certainly not too large). Is there a way to perform the following more efficiently (but in a set-up that allows for a variable number of matrices):

f1 <- function(A1, A2, ..., AD) {
  for(i in 1:nrow(A1)) {
    for(j in 1:nrow(A2)) {
      ...
        for(d in 1:nrow(AD)) {
          ret[i,j,...,d] <- \sum_{t=1}^T (A1[i,t]*A2[j,t]*...*AD[d,t])
        }
      ...
    }
  }
ret
}

Thank you very much for your help!

Romain

---------------------------------- Edit with example ----------------------------------

 A1 <- |a b c|  A2 <- |j k l|  A3 <- |s t u|
       |d e f|        |m n o|        |v w x|
       |g h i|        |p q r|        |y z ä|

And I want for instance to get the following:

ret[1,1,1] <- a*j*s + b*k*t + c*l*u
ret[2,1,3] <- d*j*y + e*k*z + f*l*ä

Hopefully this makes my point clearer.

---------------------------------- Edit Nov. 26th, 2013 -------------------------------

Hi @flodel. I tried to implement your code, but there seems to be an issue once one has more than three matrices.

Suppose, I have the following matrices

A1 <- matrix(runif(4*3), nrow = 4, ncol = 3)
A2 <- matrix(runif(3*3), nrow = 3, ncol = 3)
A3 <- matrix(runif(2*3), nrow = 2, ncol = 3)
A4 <- matrix(runif(1*3), nrow = 1, ncol = 3)

and pluging them into your code

output.f1 <- f1(A1,A2,A3,A4)

provides the correct number of dimensions

dim(output)
# [1] 4 3 2 1

but the output is full of NAs

output.f1
# , , 1, 1

           # [,1] [,2] [,3]
# [1,] 0.13534704   NA   NA
# [2,] 0.07360135   NA   NA
# [3,] 0.07360135   NA   NA
# [4,] 0.07360135   NA   NA

# , , 2, 1

     # [,1] [,2] [,3]
# [1,]   NA   NA   NA
# [2,]   NA   NA   NA
# [3,]   NA   NA   NA
# [4,]   NA   NA   NA

Thanks for some help...

Best, Romain

  • A1, A2, ..., AD have the same dimensions, for example, all have 3 rows and 4 columns? – zx8754 Nov 22 '13 at 10:47
  • 1
    The matrices A1, A2, ..., AD have the same number of columns, that's for sure. But the number of rows may be different (but not necessarily). – RomainD Nov 22 '13 at 11:12
  • Please notice the correction of the formula. I spotted the error too late. Sorry for the invonvenience! – RomainD Nov 22 '13 at 11:24
  • 2
    Can you make you example reproducible with 3 small matrix at least. It is not clear the desired output. – agstudy Nov 22 '13 at 11:37
  • See my added example. – RomainD Nov 22 '13 at 11:51
1

Give this a try. With a big apply loop, it might be slow with large matrices, but it will do the job as far as being general to any number of matrices without necessarily the same number of rows:

f1 <- function(...) {
  args    <- list(...)
  nrows   <- sapply(args, nrow)
  idx     <- do.call(expand.grid, lapply(nrows, seq.int))
  get.row <- function(i, mat) mat[i, ]
  get.val <- function(i.vec) sum(Reduce(`*`, Map(get.row, i.vec, args)))
  idx$val <- apply(idx, 1, get.val)
  ret     <- array(NA, dim = nrows)
  ret[as.matrix(idx[, seq_along(args)])] <- idx$val
  ret
}

Example usage:

A1 <- matrix(1:12, nrow = 4, ncol = 3)
A2 <- matrix(1:9,  nrow = 3, ncol = 3)
A3 <- matrix(1:6,  nrow = 2, ncol = 3)

out <- f1(A1, A2, A3)

Check:

identical(out[3, 2, 1],
          sum(A1[3, ] * A2[2, ] * A3[1, ]))
# [1] TRUE
  • (If speed is still a concern, let me know, I have other ideas but little time to test them now...) – flodel Nov 22 '13 at 12:56
  • Thanks flodel for your solution. Indeed, this version shall work for my needs. But if you know a faster version, than I'd be glad to see that one. – RomainD Nov 25 '13 at 15:14
  • Hi @flodel. Would you mind having a look at my example above. I guess that there's an issue with your solution... Thanks – RomainD Nov 27 '13 at 12:23
  • Should be fixed now. There was a hardcoded 1:3 that should have been seq_along(args) so it can work with any number of arguments, not just three. If this answers your question, please consider voting and accepting it. – flodel Nov 27 '13 at 12:46

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