1

Consider this code (http://codepad.org/lJGcW7tU):

$str = '1
2
3
4
5
6';

var_dump(explode("\n", $str));

I would expect output like this:

array(6) {
  [0]=>
  string(1) "1"
  [1]=>
  string(1) "2"
  [2]=>
  string(1) "3"
  [3]=>
  string(1) "4"
  [4]=>
  string(1) "5"
  [5]=>
  string(1) "6"
}

But actually, it's this:

array(6) {
  [0]=>
  string(2) "1
"
  [1]=>
  string(2) "2
"
  [2]=>
  string(2) "3
"
  [3]=>
  string(2) "4
"
  [4]=>
  string(2) "5
"
  [5]=>
  string(1) "6"
}

The explode seems to have added an extra character to all new array elements, except the last one. This character is not there in the original string, so where did it come from? And why?

migrated from codereview.stackexchange.com Nov 22 '13 at 18:01

This question came from our site for peer programmer code reviews.

  • 1
    Your question is unfortunately off-topic for Code Review. For questions regarding specific problems encountered while coding, try Stack Overflow. After getting your code to work (the way you want it to), you may edit this question seeking a review of your working code. – Simon Forsberg Nov 22 '13 at 12:48
  • Well, should I delete it and place it on Stack Overflow? – kasimir Nov 22 '13 at 12:59
  • 1
    I am hoping that a moderator will migrate it for you. So don't worry for now. Instead try the possible solutions I suggested below and see if they work for you. – Simon Forsberg Nov 22 '13 at 13:00
3

A line break is represented differently among different platforms. In Unix-systems, it's simply "\n", while on Windows-based systems it's "\r\n".

Your String probably contains "1\r\n2\r\n3\r\n(...)" which means that when you split it on "\n" the first index of the result is "1\r", the second is "2\r" and so on...

Different possible solutions:

  1. Initialize your string to $str = "1\n2\n3\n4\n5\n6";
  2. Write your PHP file in a text editor that uses Unix-based newlines (some more advanced text editors have a setting for which type of line break to use)
  3. Split on "\r\n" instead of just "\n"
  • This is probably right. Splitting on \r\n works fine. I had already solved it by trimming the result: array_map('trim', explode("\n", $str)) but I'm still puzzled as to where the \r\n breaks are coming from. The script (my real script) is running on a Unix-machine, the string comes from a MySQL db with which I interact through the browser on my Mac (so no Windows-machine either). Shouldn't it all be \n breaks then? – kasimir Nov 22 '13 at 13:13
  • @kasimir That depends on how the string was inserted into the database. If possible, check the actual string byte for byte in the database. If strings stored in the database can contain both \r\n line-breaks and \n line-breaks it is a good idea to trim the string as you did. – Simon Forsberg Nov 22 '13 at 13:16
  • 2
    If you need to preserve white space, you could use preg_split() to split on either line ending: preg_split( "/\r?\n/", $str ). – Charles Clarkson Nov 24 '13 at 4:46
  • White space? The unwanted white space I was seeking an explanation for? Why would I want to preserve that? – kasimir Nov 26 '13 at 13:52

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