10

I know the common way to do a topological sort is using DFS with recursion. But how would you do it using stack<int> instead of recursion? I need to obtain the reversed post-order but I'm kinda stuck:

The graph is a vector<vector<int> > adjacency list

The following is the DFS which I want to use for topological sort

bool visited[MAX]={0};
stack<int> dfs, postOrder;
vector<int> newVec;
vector<int>::iterator it;

for(int i=0;i<MAX;i++){
    if(visited[i]==false){
        dfs.push(i);
    }   
    while(!dfs.empty()){
        int node=dfs.top();
        dfs.pop();
        visited[node]=true;
        newVec=graph[node]; //vector of neighboors
        for(it=newVec.begin();it!=newVec.end();it++){
            int son=*it;
            if(visited[son]==false){
                dfs.push(son);
            }
        }
    }
}
21

In order to construct the postOrder list you need to know the time when your algorithm has finished processing the last child of node k.

One way to figure out when you have popped the last child off the stack is to put special marks on the stack to indicate spots where the children of a particular node are starting. You could change the type of your dfs stack to vector<pair<bool,int> >. When the bool is set to true, it indicates a parent; false indicates a child.

When you pop a "child pair" (i.e. one with the first member of the pair set to false) off the stack, you run the code that you currently have, i.e. push all their children onto the stack with your for loop. Before entering the for loop, however, you should push make_pair(true, node) onto the stack to mark the beginning of all children of this node.

When you pop a "parent pair" off the stack, you push the parent index onto the postOrder, and move on:

vector<bool> visited(MAX);
stack<pair<bool,int> > dfs;
stack<int> postOrder;
vector<int> newVec;
vector<int>::iterator it;
vector<vector<int> > graph;
for(int i=0;i<MAX;i++){
    if(visited[i]==false){
        dfs.push(make_pair(false,i));
    }   
    while(!dfs.empty()){
        pair<bool,int> node=dfs.top();
        dfs.pop();
        if (node.first) {
            postOrder.push(node.second);
            continue;
        }
        visited[node.second]=true;
        dfs.push(make_pair(true, node.second));
        newVec=graph[node.second]; //vector of neighboors
        for(it=newVec.begin();it!=newVec.end();it++){
            int son=*it;
            if(visited[son]==false){
                dfs.push(make_pair(false, son));
            }
        }
    }
}

Demo on ideone.

  • Don't you get the desired DFS is you only visit nodes when you pop them? You only need a single stack for this, as the original poster has above. (And by visit, I mean act on the node, not set visited = true. That you have to do on push.) – Joe Z Nov 22 '13 at 20:20
  • 1
    @JoeZ In order to sort topologically you need to know when you have finished processing the last child of a node. When you pop a node off the stack, you know that you are starting to process the first child of the node; that's too early to declare the node "visited". – dasblinkenlight Nov 22 '13 at 20:27
  • @dasblinkenlight When i ran the algorithm it gave me a topological sort with duplicate values even without back edge. Consider a graph of about 100 vertices labeled 1,2...3. Each vertex has 6 edges. For vertex 1 the six edges would go to 2,3,4,5,6,7. When I tried the topological sort it gave me duplicate values. I have a demo here: ideone.com/FJfwgB. how would you make it so that back edge will not cause duplicate values in the post order? – AlwaysNull Feb 27 '16 at 0:45
  • @dasblinkenlight did you take a look at my comment by any chance? – AlwaysNull Feb 28 '16 at 2:05
  • @AlwaysNull There's probably something wrong with your representation of the graph. The mark[i+j] == 0 looks particularly suspicious. If you'd like others to take a closer look at it, please ask a new question, with complete description of the problem that you see. Add a reference to this question so that the readers of your new question know what you used as a guidelines for your implementation of the algorithm. – dasblinkenlight Feb 28 '16 at 2:57
4

I think your code is a good non-recursive DFS . The key point of topological sort is that:

When you pick a node to push into the stack. This node must have no precessor( has a in-degree of 0). This means you are doing a DFS base on in-degree in stead of push all the adjacent nodes into the stack, you always pick the one with 0 in-degree

So you push every node that have no precessor in the stack. Pop one, print it and remove it from all its adjacent nodes' precessor list ( or decrease its adjacent nodes' in-degree by 1). This need you to edit your adjacent list. Than push all its adjacent nodes that has in-degree of 0 now in to the stack( this phase may fail but no problem, you still got some nodes in the stack). Then pop the next one. Repeat until the stack is empty. The node sequence that you printed is the topological sort result of the graph.

  • Looks like it will work, but I would have to add an extra step to find the ones with in-degree of zero, right? – fersarr Nov 22 '13 at 20:38
  • Yes and don't forget to modify the in-degree of the adjacent nodes of the node you pop from the stack. Minus them by 1. – Archeosudoerus Nov 22 '13 at 20:44
1

Below is my iterative code to topological sorting of DAG.

#include <iostream>
#include <unordered_map>
#include <unordered_set>
#include <vector>
#include <stack>
using namespace std;

unordered_map<int, unordered_set<int>> g;  // this is the simplest graph representation I was able to implement. Map the vertices to their set of children

void addEdge(int x, int y) { // Add edges to the graph
    g[x].insert(y);
}

void topSort() {
    unordered_set<int> visited; // Keep track of visited nodes
    stack<int> mainStack; // The stack that will have the resulting vertices in topologically sorted order

    for(auto it = g.begin(); it != g.end(); it++) {
        if(visited.count(it->first) == 0) { // If the vertex was not already visited do the following
            visited.insert(it->first); // visit the vertex
            stack<int> locStack;
            locStack.push(it->first); // push it to local stack
            while(!locStack.empty()) { // This part is similar to basic DFS algorithm
                int curr = locStack.top();
                bool unVisCh = false; // Keep a boolean to check whether there is any unvisited child
                for(auto it2 = g[curr].begin(); it2 != g[curr].end(); it2++) {
                    int child = *it2;
                    if(visited.count(child) == 0) {
                        unVisCh = true;
                        visited.insert(child);
                        locStack.push(child);
                    }
                }
                if(!unVisCh) { // if there is no unvisited child then we can push the vertex to the resulting stack
                    locStack.pop();
                    mainStack.push(curr);
                }
            }
        }
    }

    while(!mainStack.empty()) {
        cout<<mainStack.top()<<" ";
        mainStack.pop(); // print them in order
    }
    cout<<endl;
}

int main() {
    addEdge(1,2);
    addEdge(4,5);
    addEdge(5,6);
    addEdge(3,2);
    addEdge(2,6);
    addEdge(1,3);
    addEdge(4,3); // add adges to the graph

    topSort();

    return 0;
}

For testing: ideone

Hope that helps!

0

The node is 1st visited and is still in process, it's added to stack as false. These nodes are then processed from stack as LIFO, and changed to true (processed means children visited). After all children processed, while tracing path back, this node dropped from stack.

For those trying to implement this code, visited[node.second]=true; should be moved to the 2 places where node is 1st added to stack as false. This, so that back edges leading to already traced vertices not revisited.

-3

Here we go again. :-) I am submitting an answer, because I do not have enough points to make comments. :-(

Well let me say that I like this algorithm a lot. If the graph is defined in the right way, then there is no error. But take this graph:

vector<vector<int>> graph
{
     { 2, 1 }
    ,{ 2 }
    ,{ }
};

This will display: 2 1 2 0

To protect yourself from graphs defined in that way or where the edges that come in are random you can do this:

#include <iostream>
#include <stack>
#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    stack<pair<bool, int>> dfs;
    stack<int> postorder;
    vector<int> newvector;
    vector<int>::iterator it;
    vector<vector<int>> graph
    {
         { 2, 1 }
        ,{ 2 }
        ,{ }
    };

    vector<bool> visited(graph.size());
    vector<bool> finallyvisited(graph.size());

    for (int i = 0;i < graph.size();i++)
    {
        if (!visited[i])
        {
            dfs.push(make_pair(false, i));
        }

        while (!dfs.empty())
        {
            pair<bool, int> node = dfs.top();
            dfs.pop();
            if (node.first)
            {
                if (!finallyvisited[node.second])
                {
                    finallyvisited[node.second] = true;
                    postorder.push(node.second);
                    cout << node.second << endl;
                }
                continue;
            }

            visited[node.second] = true;
            dfs.push(make_pair(true, node.second));
            newvector = graph[node.second];
            for (it = newvector.begin();it != newvector.end();it++)
            {
                int son = *it;
                if (!visited[son])
                {
                    dfs.push(make_pair(false, son));
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return 0;
}

Or you could preorder the graph, maybe someone could show that solution. How to preorder randomly given edges that there is no need for second check. :-)

And I did though over the Atif Hussain comment and it is erroneous. That would never work. You always want to push down the stack a node as late as possible so it pops as first as possible.

  • 1
    While we appreciate the desire to help others, this is not the correct approach. First, "I can not comment, so I submit an answer" is not accepted - do not post comments as answers. The main part of your post is a real answer, and that's fine; but your last lines about Atif Hussain's answer simply don't belong here. Especially if you have nothing precise to say (after all, what you say is "I do not know"). That said... The question is tagged C++, why are you posting a C# solution? If you want to propose your solution, stick to C++. My advice is to delete this post. Sorry! – Fabio Turati Jul 14 '16 at 20:00
  • Your late answer for this old question is probably quite useless, since there is already an accepted answer (dated November 2013). Your answer is even in wrong programming language, the question was tagged with c++. – J.J. Hakala Jul 15 '16 at 4:42

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