13

If I declare a char array of say 10 chars like so...

char letters[10];

am I creating a set of memory locations that are represented as chars from index 0-9 then the 10th index is the null byte?

if so does that mean I'm really creating 11 locations in memory for the array (0 to 10) with the last element being the null byte or do I have 10 locations in memory (0 to 9) then C adds the null byte at a new position (so the array is 1 byte longer than I declared)?

Thanks

3 Answers 3

21

Seems like you are confused with arrays and strings.
When you declare

char letters[10] = { '0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9'};  

then it reserves only 10 contiguous bytes in a memory location.

  2000  2001  2002  2003  2004  2005  2006  2007  2008  2009  //memory addresses. I assumed it is to be starting from 2000 for simplification. 
 +-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+
 |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |
 | '0' | '1' | '2' | '3' | '4' | '5' | '6' | '7' | '8' | '9' |
 |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |
 +-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+

In C indexing starts from 0. You can access your allocated memory location from letters[0] to letters[9]. Accessing the location letters[10] will invoke undefined behavior. But when you declare like this

char *letters = "0123456789";  

or

char letters[11] = "0123456789"; 

then there are 11 bytes of space are allocated in memory; 10 for 0123456789 and one for \0 (NUL character).

 2000  2001  2002  2003  2004  2005  2006  2007  2008  2009  2010 //memory addresses. I assumed it is to be starting from 2000 for simplification. 
+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-------+
|     |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |       |
| '0' | '1' | '2' | '3' | '4' | '5' | '6' | '7' | '8' | '9' | '\0'  |
|     |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |       |
+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-------+  
                                                                ^
                                                                | NUL character   

Take another example

#include <stdio.h>

int main(){
   char arr[11];
   scanf("%s", arr);
   printf("%s", arr);

   return 0;
} 

Input:

asdf  

Output:

asdf

Now have a look at memory location

 +-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-------+
 |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |       |
 | 'a' | 's' | 'd' | 'f' |'\0' |     |     |     |     |     |       |
 |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |       |
 +-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-------+  
7
  • so the null byte, \0, I need to place at index 9 manually to indicate the end of the char array/string?
    – CS Student
    Nov 23, 2013 at 11:56
  • 2
    Right its starting to make more sense now. I find it strange how C adds the null byte for you in some cases and doesn't in others.
    – CS Student
    Nov 23, 2013 at 12:27
  • Sort of. My lecturer said that strings in C must end with the null byte (\0), but when using char letters[10] = { '0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9'}; there isn't the null byte at the end, which is confusing me as when you use char letter[] = "0123456789"; the null byte is there. (added by C). So if I understand your answer correctly when using the { } initialiser for a char array C doesn't need the null byte but when using the " " initialiser for a pointer to a char array, it does need the null byte?
    – CS Student
    Nov 23, 2013 at 16:22
  • 1
    ah sorry, you did answer it :p Thanks
    – CS Student
    Nov 23, 2013 at 16:31
  • so, a char array with a string literal is ALWAYS going to have the \0 at the end but a char array thats been initialised using the curly braces may not be treated/processed as a string, so therefore it doesn't need the \0 at the end. I think I now understand it. Thanks so much
    – CS Student
    Nov 23, 2013 at 16:33
10

am I creating a set of memory locations that are represented as chars from index 0-9

Yes

then the 10th index is the null byte?

No.

You reserved space for exactly 10 chars. Nothing else. Nothing will automatically set the last byte to zero, or act as if it were. There is no 11th char that could hold a zero, you only have 10.

If you're going to use that with string functions, it's your duty as the programmer to make sure that your string is null-terminated. (And here that means it can hold at most 9 significant characters.)

Some common examples with initialization:

// 10 chars exactly, not initialized - you have to take care of everything
char arr1[10];
// 10 chars exactly, all initialized - last 7 to zero - ok "C string"
char arr2[10] = { 'a', 'b', 'c' };
// three chars exactly, initialized to a, b and c - not a "C string"
char arr3[] = { 'a', 'b', 'c' };
// four chars exactly, initizalized to a, b, c and zero - ok "C string"
char arr4[] = "abc";
6
  • so my index 9 of the array has to be \0, as defined by myself? Is this still the case if I initialise the array like this: char letters[] = {'1', 'g', 't'} ? (I'd have to add the \0 after 't' ?)
    – CS Student
    Nov 23, 2013 at 11:59
  • Did I understood right: char letters[10] is array of 10 elements and char sentence[10] is also array of 10 elements where the 10th is \0. So the 1st is array of char and the 2nd is a null-terminated string?
    – yulian
    Nov 23, 2013 at 12:02
  • @YulianKhlevnoy: they're both arrays of char. The second one can be interpreted as a 9-real-character long C string assuming no other zeroes in there.
    – Mat
    Nov 23, 2013 at 12:06
  • 1
    @Mat if it were still declared a ten element array then it would happen to be terminated via zero initialization, but char letters[] = = {'1', 'g', 't'} only creates an array with storage for three elements.
    – tab
    Nov 23, 2013 at 12:27
  • I think what @Mat was trying to is that char letters[5] = {'1', 'g', 't'}, others elements get initialized to 0.
    – haccks
    Nov 23, 2013 at 12:36
3

And throughout your programming in [Turbo(C++), try to use F7, or F8 and Alt+F4, you can see what's happening inside that will be much useful for a beginner who having doubts like this

When ever you declaring a variable a seperate memory location will be alloted to that variable. In case of array variable like

char letters[10];

Ten memory space will get alloted to letters variable.

And the size of memory allocation will get vary for different datatype(i.e. int,char,float...).

Again in your case: if your want to store a name like "csstudent" in array you have declare an array size of "ten" even "csstudent" size is "nine", because the last index is to store "\0" character indicates the end of the string

//1000,1001 are memory space alloted,may will vary in you system

   1000  1001  1002  1003  1004  1005  1006  1007  1008  1009  
 +-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+------+
 |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |      |
 | 'c' | 's' | 's' | 't' | 'u' | 'd' | 'e' | 'n' | 't' | '\0' |
 |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |      |
 +-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+------+

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