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From 'Agile Web Development with Rails 4' pag.272.

If an incoming request has a controller named (say) admin/book, Rails will look for the controller called book_controller in the directory app/controllers/admin. That is, the final part of the controller name will always resolve to a file called name_controller.rb, and any leading path information will be used to navigate through subdirectories, starting in the app/controllers directory.

Imagine that our program has two such groups of controllers (say, admin/xxx and content/xxx) and that both groups define a book controller. There’d be a file called book_controller.rb in both the admin and content subdirectories of app/controllers. Both of these controller files would define a class named BookController. If Rails took no further steps, these two classes would clash. To deal with this, Rails assumes that controllers in subdirectories of the directory app/controllers are in Ruby modules named after the subdirectory.

My question is: how could the two book_controller.rb files clash?
I have two different URLs: ..../admin/book and ..../content/book, how can they clash? In the previous paragraph it explicit says

[..] any leading path information will be used to navigate through subdirectories, starting in the app/controllers directory

2 Answers 2

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The file names do not matter. What matter are the constant names.

It's totally okay to have two files with identical names, like controllers/admin/books_controller.rb, and controllers/books_controller.rb.

However, the class names inside those controller should be different. You can add namespace to differentiate them. For example

class Admin::BooksController

class BooksController
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  • I believe file names do matter. I might be wrong though, I remember running into an issue having a different filename.
    – Leo Correa
    Nov 23, 2013 at 13:36
  • I have same file names inside projects all the day. What matters is the constant names after loading the file, not file name itself. It would look ugly to have file name like admin/admin_books_controller.rb rather than admin/books_controller.rb.
    – Billy Chan
    Nov 23, 2013 at 13:43
  • do I need to specify the namespace because when Rails loads all the classes it can't have two classes with same name?
    – zer0uno
    Nov 23, 2013 at 13:47
  • @BillyChan I didn't mean that kind of filename. I don't think you can have a filename called cool_controller.rb with a class BookController as the autoload craps up.
    – Leo Correa
    Nov 23, 2013 at 13:52
  • @antox you do need to specify the module for the path admin/book_controller.rb you'd need to have Admin::BookController
    – Leo Correa
    Nov 23, 2013 at 13:53
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Imagine the filepaths like this

../app/controllers/admin/book_controller.rb

&&

../app/controllers/content/book_controller.rb

Rails uses convention over configuration: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Convention_over_configuration

Like it states in the last paragraph

If Rails took no further steps, these two classes would clash. To deal with this, Rails assumes that controllers in subdirectories of the directory app/controllers are in Ruby modules named after the subdirectory.

Someone please correct me if I'm wrong but rails would look for models named admin.rb and content.rb

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