0
public static void randomN () {
    int requestTime = 2;
    if(requestTime > 0) {
      requestTime--;  
      myTimer.scheduleAtFixedRate(new TimerTask() {
              public void run() {
                int randomx = (int) (Math.random()*6+1);
                int randomy = (int) (Math.random()*6+1);
                System.out.println("Requests" + "X : " + randomx + " Y: " + randomy);
              }
      }, 0, 1000);
    } else {
          myTimer.cancel();
          myTimer.purge();
    } 
}

I want my timer to do the task inside public void run() { ... } and do it every seconds for 2 seconds. But this code doesn't work properly.

5
  • Is this static method called from different threads? – Eugen Martynov Nov 23 '13 at 21:14
  • Are you sure that you call randomN() at least three times? – Eugen Martynov Nov 23 '13 at 21:16
  • 1
    What does doesn't work mean? – Justin Jasmann Nov 23 '13 at 21:17
  • Why would I call randomN() three times? I called randomN() in public static void main if that's what you ask. – morgothraud Nov 23 '13 at 21:18
  • implements your own TimeTask with a countdown to 3? – user180100 Nov 23 '13 at 21:23
1

in this code:

public static void randomN () {
    int requestTime = 2;
    if(requestTime > 0) { //..

your requestTime will always be 2 at the time of if statement, no matter how many times you call the method. I guess you want

static int requestTime = 2;
public static void randomN () {
    if(requestTime > 0) { //..
1

Try to cancel the timer from inside the task after two executions and change the last parameter of scheduleAtFixedRate(TimerTask,long,long) to 2000 milliseconds. And probably the second as well, if you want it to start after 2 seconds as well.

final Timer timer = new Timer();
timer.scheduleAtFixedRate(new TimerTask() {
    private int counter = 2;
    @Override
    public void run() {
        counter--;
        if(counter >= 0)
            System.out.println(counter + " more ticks to go.");
        else
            timer.cancel();
    }
}, 0, 2000);
1

You won't stop, because you have decremented requestTime only once before the Timer starts. The timer only execute the code inside run() method repeatedly with the period you have given. So if you want to update requestTime you will have to do it in the run() method.

        final int requestTime = 2; 
        final Timer timer = new Timer();

        timer.scheduleAtFixedRate(new TimerTask() {
         int aRequestTime = requestTime; 
           @Override
           public void run() {
               if(aRequestTime > 0)
               {
                   aRequestTime--;
               }

               else timer.cancel();
           }
       }, 0, 2000);

Try declare your Timer and requestTime in your Class context instead of function to get rid of the final variable. As you know local inner class: Anonymous class won't change the local variable.

5
  • what about visibility of variables? – Eugen Martynov Nov 23 '13 at 21:37
  • I did point that out at the end of my answer i guess. As i have used aRequestTime to read requestTime first and updated it. – Sage Nov 23 '13 at 21:42
  • I need to read more about java memory threading. Question was about should timer variable be marked with volatile keyword? – Eugen Martynov Nov 23 '13 at 21:50
  • volatile keyword is used as an indicator to Java compiler and Thread that do not cache value of this variable and always read it from main memory which reduces the risk of memory consistency errors, because any write to a volatile variable establishes a happens-before relationship with subsequent reads of that same variable. Although OP hasn't specified whither his program is in multi-threading environment or not: my code above actually assumes that the timer is local to the randomN function (that is the reason of using final actually) So no worries for multi-thread inference here. – Sage Nov 23 '13 at 22:03
  • Thank you for clarification – Eugen Martynov Nov 24 '13 at 9:08
0

Modify code to next:

private static volatile Timer myTimer = new Timer();
private static volatile int runTimes = 0;

public static void randomN () {
  myTimer.scheduleAtFixedRate(new TimerTask() {

          public void run() {
            runTimes++;

            printRandomXY();
            cancelTimerIfRunTwice();
          }
  }, 0, 1000);
}

private static void printRandomXY() {
   int randomx = (int) (Math.random()*6+1);
   int randomy = (int) (Math.random()*6+1);
   System.out.println("Requests" + "X : " + randomx + " Y: " + randomy);
}

private static void cancelTimerIfRunTwice() {
   if (runTimes == 2) {
       myTimer.cancel();
       myTimer.purge();
   }
}
2
  • I should consider volatile more often, it's sometimes very handy. Thanks for reminding me of that. – Sebastian Höffner Nov 23 '13 at 21:31
  • It is better to use java concurrent – Eugen Martynov Nov 23 '13 at 21:34

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.