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I've got a large (by number of lines) plain text file that I'd like to split into smaller files, also by number of lines. So if my file has around 2M lines, I'd like to split it up into 10 files that contain 200k lines, or 100 files that contain 20k lines (plus one file with the remainder; being evenly divisible doesn't matter).

I could do this fairly easily in Python, but I'm wondering if there's any kind of ninja way to do this using Bash and Unix utilities (as opposed to manually looping and counting / partitioning lines).

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  • 3
    Out of curiousity, after they're "split", how does one "combine" them? Something like "cat part2 >> part1"? Or is there another ninja utility? mind updating your question?
    – dlamotte
    Jan 6 '10 at 22:47
  • 8
    To put it back together, cat part* > original
    – Mark Byers
    Jan 6 '10 at 22:49
  • 10
    yes cat is short for concatenate. In general apropos is useful for finding appropriate commands. I.E. see the output of: apropos split
    – pixelbeat
    Jan 6 '10 at 22:51
  • @pixelbeat That is pretty cool, thanks
    – danben
    Jan 6 '10 at 23:00
  • 3
    As an aside, OS X users should make sure their file contains LINUX or UNIX-style Line breaks/End-Of-Line indicators (LF) instead of MAC OS X - style end-of-line indicators (CR) - the split and csplit commands will not work if your like breaks are Carriage Returns instead of LineFeeds. TextWrangler from BareBones software can help you with this if you're on Mac OS. You can choose how you want your line break characters look. when you save (or Save As...) your text files.
    – user1763836
    Oct 21 '12 at 21:34

10 Answers 10

984

Have a look at the split command:

$ split --help
Usage: split [OPTION] [INPUT [PREFIX]]
Output fixed-size pieces of INPUT to PREFIXaa, PREFIXab, ...; default
size is 1000 lines, and default PREFIX is `x'.  With no INPUT, or when INPUT
is -, read standard input.

Mandatory arguments to long options are mandatory for short options too.
  -a, --suffix-length=N   use suffixes of length N (default 2)
  -b, --bytes=SIZE        put SIZE bytes per output file
  -C, --line-bytes=SIZE   put at most SIZE bytes of lines per output file
  -d, --numeric-suffixes  use numeric suffixes instead of alphabetic
  -l, --lines=NUMBER      put NUMBER lines per output file
      --verbose           print a diagnostic to standard error just
                            before each output file is opened
      --help     display this help and exit
      --version  output version information and exit

You could do something like this:

split -l 200000 filename

which will create files each with 200000 lines named xaa xab xac ...

Another option, split by size of output file (still splits on line breaks):

 split -C 20m --numeric-suffixes input_filename output_prefix

creates files like output_prefix01 output_prefix02 output_prefix03 ... each of maximum size 20 megabytes.

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  • 21
    you can also split a file by size: split -b 200m filename (m for megabytes, k for kilobytes or no suffix for bytes) Jun 24 '11 at 7:55
  • 147
    split by size and ensure files are split on line breaks: split -C 200m filename Dec 13 '12 at 2:12
  • 2
    split produces garbled output with Unicode (UTF-16) input. At least on Windows with the version I have.
    – Vertigo
    May 24 '13 at 7:57
  • 4
    @geotheory, be sure to follow LeberMac's advice earlier in the thread about first converting CR (Mac) line endings to LR (Linux) line endings using TextWrangler or BBEdit. I had the exact same problem as you until I found that piece of advice.
    – sstringer
    Aug 25 '13 at 20:00
  • 7
    -d option is not available on OSX, use gsplit instead. Hope this useful for Mac user. Jul 23 '17 at 11:54
98

Use the split command:

split -l 200000 mybigfile.txt
49

Yes, there is a split command. It will split a file by lines or bytes.

$ split --help
Usage: split [OPTION]... [INPUT [PREFIX]]
Output fixed-size pieces of INPUT to PREFIXaa, PREFIXab, ...; default
size is 1000 lines, and default PREFIX is `x'.  With no INPUT, or when INPUT
is -, read standard input.

Mandatory arguments to long options are mandatory for short options too.
  -a, --suffix-length=N   use suffixes of length N (default 2)
  -b, --bytes=SIZE        put SIZE bytes per output file
  -C, --line-bytes=SIZE   put at most SIZE bytes of lines per output file
  -d, --numeric-suffixes  use numeric suffixes instead of alphabetic
  -l, --lines=NUMBER      put NUMBER lines per output file
      --verbose           print a diagnostic just before each
                            output file is opened
      --help     display this help and exit
      --version  output version information and exit

SIZE may have a multiplier suffix:
b 512, kB 1000, K 1024, MB 1000*1000, M 1024*1024,
GB 1000*1000*1000, G 1024*1024*1024, and so on for T, P, E, Z, Y.
3
  • Tried georgec@ATGIS25 ~ $ split -l 100000 /cygdrive/P/2012/Job_044_DM_Radio_Propogation/Working/FinalPropogation/TRC_Longlands/trc_longlands.txt but there are no split files in the directory -where is the output?
    – GeorgeC
    Mar 8 '12 at 4:05
  • 1
    It should be in the same directory. E.g. if I want to split by 1,000,000 lines per file, do the following: split -l 1000000 train_file train_file. and in the same directory I'll get train_file.aa with the first million, then trail_file.ab with the next million, etc.
    – Will
    Feb 8 '15 at 21:49
  • 2
    @GeorgeC and you can get custom output directories with the prefix: split input my/dir/. Apr 24 '16 at 20:56
17

Use split:

Split a file into fixed-size pieces, creates output files containing consecutive sections of INPUT (standard input if none is given or INPUT is `-')

Syntax split [options] [INPUT [PREFIX]]

13

Use:

sed -n '1,100p' filename > output.txt

Here, 1 and 100 are the line numbers which you will capture in output.txt.

1
  • This only obtains the first 100 lines, you need to loop it to successively split the file into the next 101..200 etc. Or just use split like all the top answers here already tell you.
    – tripleee
    Feb 1 '19 at 9:34
13

split (from GNU coreutils, since version 8.8 from 2010-12-22) includes the following parameter:

-n, --number=CHUNKS     generate CHUNKS output files; see explanation below

CHUNKS may be:
  N       split into N files based on size of input
  K/N     output Kth of N to stdout
  l/N     split into N files without splitting lines/records
  l/K/N   output Kth of N to stdout without splitting lines/records
  r/N     like 'l' but use round robin distribution
  r/K/N   likewise but only output Kth of N to stdout

Thus, split -n 4 input output. will generate four files (output.a{a,b,c,d}) with the same amount of bytes, but lines might be broken in the middle.

If we want to preserve full lines (i.e. split by lines), then this should work:

split -n l/4 input output.

Related answer: https://stackoverflow.com/a/19031247

12

Split the file "file.txt" into 10,000-lines files:

split -l 10000 file.txt
11

You can also use AWK:

awk -vc=1 'NR%200000==0{++c}{print $0 > c".txt"}' largefile
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  • 4
    awk -v lines=200000 -v fmt="%d.txt" '{print>sprintf(fmt,1+int((NR-1)/lines))}'
    – Mark Edgar
    Jan 7 '10 at 6:52
10

In case you just want to split by x number of lines each file, the given answers about split are OK. But, I am curious about why no one paid attention to the requirements:

  • "without having to count them" -> using wc + cut
  • "having the remainder in extra file" -> split does by default

I can't do that without "wc + cut", but I'm using that:

split -l  $(expr `wc $filename | cut -d ' ' -f3` / $chunks) $filename

This can be easily added to your .bashrc file functions, so you can just invoke it, passing the filename and chunks:

 split -l  $(expr `wc $1 | cut -d ' ' -f3` / $2) $1

In case you want just x chunks without remainder in the extra file, just adapt the formula to sum it (chunks - 1) on each file. I do use this approach because usually I just want x number of files rather than x lines per file:

split -l  $(expr `wc $1 | cut -d ' ' -f3` / $2 + `expr $2 - 1`) $1

You can add that to a script and call it your "ninja way", because if nothing suites your needs, you can build it :-)

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  • 1
    Or, just use the -n option of split.
    – Amit Naidu
    Jun 20 '19 at 0:00
0

HDFS getmerge small file and split into a proper size.

This method will cause line breaks:

split -b 125m compact.file -d -a 3 compact_prefix

I try to getmerge and split into about 128 MB for every file.

# Split into 128 MB, and judge sizeunit is M or G. Please test before use.

begainsize=`hdfs dfs -du -s -h /externaldata/$table_name/$date/ | awk '{ print $1}' `
sizeunit=`hdfs dfs -du -s -h /externaldata/$table_name/$date/ | awk '{ print $2}' `
if [ $sizeunit = "G" ];then
    res=$(printf "%.f" `echo "scale=5;$begainsize*8 "|bc`)
else
    res=$(printf "%.f" `echo "scale=5;$begainsize/128 "|bc`)  # Celling ref http://blog.csdn.net/naiveloafer/article/details/8783518
fi
echo $res
# Split into $res files with a number suffix. Ref:  http://blog.csdn.net/microzone/article/details/52839598
compact_file_name=$compact_file"_"
echo "compact_file_name: "$compact_file_name
split -n l/$res $basedir/$compact_file -d -a 3 $basedir/${compact_file_name}
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