469

How do I find the type of an object in Go? In Python, I just use typeof to fetch the type of object. Similarly in Go, is there a way to implement the same ?

Here is the container from which I am iterating:

for e := dlist.Front(); e != nil; e = e.Next() {
    lines := e.Value
    fmt.Printf(reflect.TypeOf(lines))
}

I am not able to get the type of the object lines in this case which is an array of strings.

2
  • The standard reference aint working in my program. I should have included the source code my bad.
    – Rahul
    Nov 24 '13 at 4:05
  • 15
    fmt.Printf("%T\n", var)
    – meh
    Sep 9 '18 at 23:15

15 Answers 15

570
Answer recommended by Go Language

The Go reflection package has methods for inspecting the type of variables.

The following snippet will print out the reflection type of a string, integer and float.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "reflect"
)

func main() {

    tst := "string"
    tst2 := 10
    tst3 := 1.2

    fmt.Println(reflect.TypeOf(tst))
    fmt.Println(reflect.TypeOf(tst2))
    fmt.Println(reflect.TypeOf(tst3))

}

Output:

Hello, playground
string
int
float64

see: http://play.golang.org/p/XQMcUVsOja to view it in action.

More documentation here: http://golang.org/pkg/reflect/#Type

1
  • reflect aint working for me. I have updated the question. I have included code snippet in this case.
    – Rahul
    Nov 24 '13 at 4:08
518

I found 3 ways to return a variable's type at runtime:

Using string formatting

func typeof(v interface{}) string {
    return fmt.Sprintf("%T", v)
}

Using reflect package

func typeof(v interface{}) string {
    return reflect.TypeOf(v).String()
}

Using type assertions

func typeof(v interface{}) string {
    switch v.(type) {
    case int:
        return "int"
    case float64:
        return "float64"
    //... etc
    default:
        return "unknown"
    }
}

Every method has a different best use case:

  • string formatting - short and low footprint (not necessary to import reflect package)

  • reflect package - when need more details about the type we have access to the full reflection capabilities

  • type assertions - allows grouping types, for example recognize all int32, int64, uint32, uint64 types as "int"

4
  • 4
    It seems that you can get rid of variable t, so t := v.(type) becomes v.(type), and _ = t is no longer needed.
    – Akavall
    Feb 28 '17 at 6:21
  • 3
    Based on a barebones benchmark, the reflect approach is surprisingly more efficient gist.github.com/mrap/7f08c9549289b6aea2923c27888e7e3e Apr 6 '17 at 20:53
  • 1
    case 'T': p.fmt.fmtS(reflect.TypeOf(arg).String()). fmt package using reflect to print type Feb 3 '20 at 3:40
  • 1
    Note that v.(type) only works in switch statements. Dec 2 '20 at 10:18
55

Use the reflect package:

Package reflect implements run-time reflection, allowing a program to manipulate objects with arbitrary types. The typical use is to take a value with static type interface{} and extract its dynamic type information by calling TypeOf, which returns a Type.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "reflect"
)

func main() {
    b := true
    s := ""
    n := 1
    f := 1.0
    a := []string{"foo", "bar", "baz"}

    fmt.Println(reflect.TypeOf(b))
    fmt.Println(reflect.TypeOf(s))
    fmt.Println(reflect.TypeOf(n))
    fmt.Println(reflect.TypeOf(f))
    fmt.Println(reflect.TypeOf(a))
}

Produces:

bool
string
int
float64
[]string

Playground

Example using ValueOf(i interface{}).Kind():

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "reflect"
)

func main() {
    b := true
    s := ""
    n := 1
    f := 1.0
    a := []string{"foo", "bar", "baz"}

    fmt.Println(reflect.ValueOf(b).Kind())
    fmt.Println(reflect.ValueOf(s).Kind())
    fmt.Println(reflect.ValueOf(n).Kind())
    fmt.Println(reflect.ValueOf(f).Kind())
    fmt.Println(reflect.ValueOf(a).Index(0).Kind()) // For slices and strings
}

Produces:

bool
string
int
float64
string

Playground

3
  • reflect only displays the standard types. I am not able to get types of elements of a list container.
    – Rahul
    Nov 24 '13 at 4:09
  • I've updated my answer to include a slice of strings. Reflect works for any type. Please read the docs: golang.org/pkg/reflect & blog.golang.org/laws-of-reflection should be enough, although there are many SO questions related to reflection in Go that should help you out as well. Nov 24 '13 at 7:55
  • 3
    ughhh, how can I determine if the type is a string? if reflect.TypeOf(err) == string? Dec 20 '18 at 2:51
46

To get a string representation:

From http://golang.org/pkg/fmt/

%T a Go-syntax representation of the type of the value

package main
import "fmt"
func main(){
    types := []interface{} {"a",6,6.0,true}
    for _,v := range types{
        fmt.Printf("%T\n",v)
    }
}

Outputs:

string
int
float64
bool
0
17

I would stay away from the reflect. package. Instead use %T

package main

import (
    "fmt"
)

func main() {
    b := true
    s := ""
    n := 1
    f := 1.0
    a := []string{"foo", "bar", "baz"}

    fmt.Printf("%T\n", b)
    fmt.Printf("%T\n", s)
    fmt.Printf("%T\n", n)
    fmt.Printf("%T\n", f)
    fmt.Printf("%T\n", a)
 }
15

Best way is using reflection concept in Google.
reflect.TypeOf gives type along with the package name
reflect.TypeOf().Kind() gives underlining type

0
10

To be short, please use fmt.Printf("%T", var1) or its other variants in the fmt package.

0
5

You can check the type of any variable/instance at runtime either using the "reflect" packages TypeOf function or by using fmt.Printf():

package main

import (
   "fmt"
   "reflect"
)

func main() {
    value1 := "Have a Good Day"
    value2 := 50
    value3 := 50.78

    fmt.Println(reflect.TypeOf(value1 ))
    fmt.Println(reflect.TypeOf(value2))
    fmt.Println(reflect.TypeOf(value3))
    fmt.Printf("%T",value1)
    fmt.Printf("%T",value2)
    fmt.Printf("%T",value3)
}
5

To get the type of fields in struct

package main

import (
  "fmt"
  "reflect"
)

type testObject struct {
  Name   string
  Age    int
  Height float64
}

func main() {
   tstObj := testObject{Name: "yog prakash", Age: 24, Height: 5.6}
   val := reflect.ValueOf(&tstObj).Elem()
   typeOfTstObj := val.Type()
   for i := 0; i < val.NumField(); i++ {
       fieldType := val.Field(i)
       fmt.Printf("object field %d key=%s value=%v type=%s \n",
          i, typeOfTstObj.Field(i).Name, fieldType.Interface(),
          fieldType.Type())
   }
}

Output

object field 0 key=Name value=yog prakash type=string 
object field 1 key=Age value=24 type=int 
object field 2 key=Height value=5.6 type=float64

See in IDE https://play.golang.org/p/bwIpYnBQiE

3

If we have this variables:

var counter int = 5
var message string  = "Hello"
var factor float32 = 4.2
var enabled bool = false

1: fmt.Printf %T format : to use this feature you should import "fmt"

fmt.Printf("%T \n",factor )   // factor type: float32

2: reflect.TypeOf function : to use this feature you should import "reflect"

fmt.Println(reflect.TypeOf(enabled)) // enabled type:  bool

3: reflect.ValueOf(X).Kind() : to use this feature you should import "reflect"

fmt.Println(reflect.ValueOf(counter).Kind()) // counter type:  int
2

You can use: interface{}..(type) as in this playground

package main
import "fmt"
func main(){
    types := []interface{} {"a",6,6.0,true}
    for _,v := range types{
        fmt.Printf("%T\n",v)
        switch v.(type) {
        case int:
           fmt.Printf("Twice %v is %v\n", v, v.(int) * 2)
        case string:
           fmt.Printf("%q is %v bytes long\n", v, len(v.(string)))
       default:
          fmt.Printf("I don't know about type %T!\n", v)
      }
    }
}
1
  • 1
    You can also do this trick: switch v := v.(type) and then do this: case int: fmt.Printf("Twice %v is %v\n", v, v * 2) and case string: fmt.Printf("%q is %v bytes long\n", v, len(v)). The inner v variable in switch statement shadows original v, so inside case code block v assumend as variable of type that specified in case statement.
    – Arkemlar
    Apr 4 at 22:30
1

For arrays and slices use Type.Elem():

a := []string{"foo", "bar", "baz"}
fmt.Println(reflect.TypeOf(a).Elem())
0

you can use reflect.TypeOf.

  • basic type(e.g.: int, string): it will return its name (e.g.: int, string)
  • struct: it will return something in the format <package name>.<struct name> (e.g.: main.test)
-2

reflect package comes to rescue:

reflect.TypeOf(obj).String()

Check this demo

-2

You can just use the fmt package fmt.Printf() method, more information: https://golang.org/pkg/fmt/

example: https://play.golang.org/p/aJG5MOxjBJD

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