3

I have two (very large) tables of identical structure, holding two types of locations :

LocA

  • Id - INT
  • X - FLOAT (latitude)
  • Y - FLOAT (longitude)

and

LocB

  • Id - INT
  • X - FLOAT (latitude)
  • Y - FLOAT (longitude)

Each of them hold several million rows. I need to select all locations in LocA and for each location, the closest location in LocB.

What would be the most efficient query to do this?

EDIT1 : The distance algorithm would be a dumb one : SQRT(POWER(LocB.X - LocA.X, 2) + POWER(LocB.Y - LocA.Y, 2))

EDIT2 : An implementation that I've done but I'm really not sure if it's optimal (I highly doubt it), would be :

SELECT  A.Id    AS AId,
(   SELECT TOP 1 B.Id
    FROM    B
    ORDER BY SQRT(POWER(B.X - A.X, 2) + POWER(B.Y - A.Y, 2)) ASC
)               AS BId
FROM    A

EDIT3 : It's common to have "duplicates" in table LocB but I would want any of the matching "closest" to be returned for a location in LocA, not all.

10
  • 1
    Using what algorithm for "closest"? There are many – Jamiec Nov 25 '13 at 15:05
  • 2
    @Jamiec: Don't meh too early. We are still talking about 10,000,000² calculations. – Twinkles Nov 25 '13 at 15:15
  • 1
    How would you handle equidistant points? Return all matching points? Just one? Also, is this a one-off or a recurring query? – MichaelMilom Nov 25 '13 at 15:16
  • 1
    I suggest you examine spatial datatypes and indexes for such queries. – ypercubeᵀᴹ Nov 25 '13 at 15:29
  • 2
    This specific page will be of most interest to you: Query Spatial Data for Nearest Neighbor – ypercubeᵀᴹ Nov 25 '13 at 15:35
0

How about :

SELECT id as Aid,x,y,m % 100 as bId
FROM (
SELECT A.id,A.x,A.y,MIN(CAST(((A.x-B.x)*(A.x-B.x)+(A.y-B.y)*(A.y-B.y)) AS BIGINT)*100+B.id)     as m 
FROM A
CROSS JOIN B
GROUP BY A.id,A.x,A.y) j;
1
  • This is not returning duplicate distances. – Amir Keshavarz Nov 25 '13 at 16:38
2

This is not likely to be very efficient, but at the moment I can't see a better way:

SELECT  a.ID, a.X, a.Y, b.ID, b.X, b.Y, b.Distance
FROM    LocA a
        CROSS APPLY
        (   SELECT  TOP 1 WITH TIES
                    b.ID, 
                    b.X, 
                    b.Y, 
                    Distance = SQRT(POWER(b.X - a.X, 2) + POWER(b.Y - a.Y, 2))
            FROM    LocB b 
            ORDER BY Distance
        ) B;
4
  • This has a problem and if two points have same distance one of them are returned. – Amir Keshavarz Nov 25 '13 at 15:36
  • 1
    @AmirrezaKeshavarz Corrected to resolve the problem of ties, if there are ties it will return all records. – GarethD Nov 25 '13 at 15:36
  • This is pretty much equivalent to the OP's query - except it provides the WITH TIES option to be added. – ypercubeᵀᴹ Nov 25 '13 at 15:41
  • @ypercube Yes, the edit had not been done when I started my answer, and due to the position of the answer box on my page I could not see the flag that indicated the question had been edited, so by the time I had seen what the OP had put I had already posted the answer. It also has the added benefit of allowing the distance and the ID to be returned in a single query, were it not for this I would have removed it. – GarethD Nov 25 '13 at 15:45
2

Have you thought to take into consideration geography::Point, STDistance method, and create a spatial index on those points columns?

If your database structure is fixed, you can add a new persisted computed column.

1

The SQRT is not going to change the ORDER - it is just overhead

SELECT  A.Id AS AId,
(   SELECT TOP 1 B.Id
    FROM    B
    ORDER BY POWER(B.X - A.X, 2) + POWER(B.Y - A.Y, 2) ASC
)               AS BId
FROM    A

I am thinking there is a way to perform two passes
You know the distance is <= delta X + delta Y
And the maximum error in that approximation is SQRT(2) - 1

This does not deal with duplicates or ties

I suspect the extra IO is not going to make up for the reduced number of POWER calculations but it might be worth a try
Only worth a try if you have #temp on SSD

create #temp1
IDa
IDb
Xa
Ya
Xb 
Yb 
distSum
distAct 

insert into #temp (IDa, IDb, Xa, Ya, Xb ,Yb, distSum)
select a.ID, b.ID, a.x, a.y, b.x, b.y, abs(a.X-b.X) + abs(a.Y-b.Y)
table as a 
join table as b 
on a.ID < b.ID 

delete #temp 
from #temp 
join 
(select IDa, min(distSum) as minDistSum from #temp group by IDa) as aMin 
on #temp.IDa = aMin.IDa 
and #temp.distSum > 1.414*(minDistSum) 

update #temp 
set distAct = POWER(Xa - Xb, 2) + POWER(Ya - Yb, 2)
0
0

This is the code :

WITH S AS (
SELECT *
FROM LOCA CROSS APPLY( select locb.id as ID_B, (POWER(LocB.X - LocA.X, 2) + POWER(LocB.Y - LocA.Y, 2)) D  FROM LOCB ) S
)
SELECT DISTINCT ID,X,Y,d,ID_B
FROM S
where d=(select min(d) from s s1 where s1.ID=s.id)
3
  • good answer but i think the OP wanted the closest location (lat/long), not the minimum distance. – Jamiec Nov 25 '13 at 15:15
  • Yes, indeed. I would need the ID of the location in LocB, also. However, thank you for taking the time to construct it! – Andrei Rînea Nov 25 '13 at 15:19
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    Why use a windowed function in SELECT DISTINCT ID, X, Y, MIN(D) OVER(PARTITION BY ID) FROM S instead of the more traditional SELECT ID, X, Y, MIN(D) FROM S GROUP BY ID, X, Y;? The two are synonymous (assuming ID is the primary key) with the latter being more efficient and (in my opinion) more readable. – GarethD Nov 25 '13 at 15:29

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