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I'm in the process of converting a project from NHibernate to Entity Framework 6.

Given this simple model:

public class User
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public string FullName { get; set; }
    public virtual Organization Organization { get; set; }
    // [...]
}

public class Organization
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public virtual List<User> Users { get; set; }
    // [...]
}

Accessing the primary key (ID) through the Organization navigation property will cause the whole Organization entity to be loaded into the context:

foreach(var user in db.Users)
    Console.WriteLine(user.Organization.ID);

Given that the OrganizationID foreign key is part of the User row, I should be able to access it without causing a Lazy Load of the whole entity (and indeed, NHibernate does this properly).

Short of adding properties for the foreign key IDs into all of my 100+ entities so I can access their values without loading the entities, is there anything to be done to avoid this behaviour?

EDIT: Furthermore, even doing a null check will cause a load of the Organization entity (not in NHibernate):

foreach(var user in db.Users)
    Console.WriteLine(user.Organization != null);

I guess this is due to the fundamental differences in the way the entity proxy is implemented in these two frameworks. So I'll have to adapt all of my code to this new frustrating behaviour... Unless someone already had to go through this and could enlighten me?

  • Hello ECC-Dan, how did you manage to solve this problem eventually? I am facing the same issue and i don't want to add ID for each navigational property. – Vagelis Ouranos Nov 4 '14 at 8:10
  • Sorry for the late reply; I never got around to solve this issue since we actually ended up giving up on the conversion to Entity Framework due to this and other more serious limitations compared to NHibernate. – ECC-Dan Jan 29 '15 at 18:16
1

Nope, you'll need to add them as property in your class (that is; if you want it strong typed) like this to access it directly.

public class User
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public string FullName { get; set; }

    //added ID    
    public int OrganizationID { get; set; }
    public virtual Organization Organization { get; set; }
    // [...]
}

By accessing the int you'll prevent the lazy loading, EF will bind the ID through naming conventions. Having said that: 100+ classes... :|

UPDATE:

As I just realized; you might want to try:

db.Users
        .Include("Organization.ID")
        .Where(/*your stuff*/) //etc.;

I am not certain if it will fully load the nested property. If it doesn't, it might be a small performance gain.

| improve this answer | |
  • @ECC-Dan: there might be a non-strong-typed-way as well. But I don't have the knowledge resent at the moment. – Stefan Nov 25 '13 at 17:00
  • Adding the properties to the classes is one thing, modifying all of the business code is quite another. What did you mean by a non-strongly-typed way? In any case I don't think that would save me from having to modify all of that code... – ECC-Dan Nov 25 '13 at 17:03
  • non-strong-typed-way, as I vaguely remember, I once was involved in developing a framework on top of EF, where properties of entities where set through the DbSet by the name (as string). I am not sure how, it was a long time ago, and I wouldn't recommend it, as for as far I can remember it; it was a dirty job. – Stefan Nov 25 '13 at 17:08
  • That might work, but I'd rather add the foreign key properties and use those... feels a bit cleaner. Thanks though! – ECC-Dan Nov 25 '13 at 17:38

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