17

my question might sound trivial to quite a lot of you, but after a long internet search I still don't have an answer to the following question:

How to convert a three dimensional array to a "three dimensional" list?

Suppose I have the following:

A1 <- matrix(runif(12),4,3)
A2 <- matrix(runif(12),4,3)
A3 <- matrix(runif(12),4,3)

MyList  <- list(A1,A2,A3)

MyArray <- array(NA,c(4,3,3))
MyArray[,,1] <- A1
MyArray[,,2] <- A2
MyArray[,,3] <- A3

Is there a way to convert MyArray into a list with "the same structure" as MyList?

Thank you very much for your help! Best, Romain

6

For fun (since I'm late), here is another one that only uses base R. Like @joran's, it is programmable in the sense you can easily split along any given dimension n:

split.along.dim <- function(a, n)
  setNames(lapply(split(a, arrayInd(seq_along(a), dim(a))[, n]),
                  array, dim = dim(a)[-n], dimnames(a)[-n]),
           dimnames(a)[[n]])

identical(split.along.dim(MyArray, n = 3), MyList)
# [1] TRUE

It will also preserve all your dimnames if you have any, see for example:

dimnames(MyArray) <- Map(paste0, letters[seq_along(dim(MyArray))],
                                 lapply(dim(MyArray), seq))
split.along.dim(MyArray, n = 3)
18

You can use lapply:

lapply(seq(dim(MyArray)[3]), function(x) MyArray[ , , x])


# [[1]]
#           [,1]       [,2]      [,3]
# [1,] 0.2050745 0.21410846 0.2433970
# [2,] 0.9662453 0.93294504 0.1466763
# [3,] 0.5775559 0.86977616 0.6950287
# [4,] 0.4626039 0.04009952 0.5197830
# 
# [[2]]
#           [,1]      [,2]      [,3]
# [1,] 0.6323070 0.2684788 0.7232186
# [2,] 0.1986486 0.2096121 0.2878846
# [3,] 0.3064698 0.7326781 0.8339690
# [4,] 0.3068035 0.4559094 0.8783581
# 
# [[3]]
#           [,1]      [,2]      [,3]
# [1,] 0.9557156 0.9069851 0.3415961
# [2,] 0.5287296 0.6292590 0.8291184
# [3,] 0.4023539 0.8106378 0.4257489
# [4,] 0.7199638 0.2708597 0.6327383
  • Or just use a loop over the third index, tho' this is cleaner. – Carl Witthoft Nov 25 '13 at 17:20
  • +1 - And a more programmable version could use abind::asub as follows: lapply(seq(dim(MyArray)[3]), asub, x = MyArray, dims = 3). – flodel Nov 26 '13 at 2:51
  • Thanks for the reply. But as said above, I'll go for the "dimname" preserving feature! Best, Romain – RomainD Nov 26 '13 at 6:55
  • 1
    +1 because it is way faster than plyr::alply. For a array with dims = c(50,10,1688). system.time(replicate(500, alply(myarray,3))) user: 82.840 system: 1.953 elapsed: 85.331. And system.time(replicate(500, lapply(seq(dim(myarray)[3]), function(x) myarray[,,x]))) user: 5.242 system: 0.874 elapsed: 6.155 – SwatchPuppy Aug 5 '15 at 15:55
17

There is a handy function in plyr for this:

alply(MyArray,3)
$`1`
          [,1]       [,2]       [,3]
[1,] 0.7643427 0.27546113 0.31131581
[2,] 0.6254926 0.19449191 0.04617286
[3,] 0.5879341 0.10484810 0.08056612
[4,] 0.4423744 0.09046864 0.82333646

$`2`
          [,1]      [,2]      [,3]
[1,] 0.3726026 0.3063512 0.4997664
[2,] 0.8757070 0.2309768 0.9274503
[3,] 0.9269987 0.5751226 0.9347077
[4,] 0.4063655 0.4593746 0.4830263

$`3`
          [,1]       [,2]      [,3]
[1,] 0.7538325 0.18824996 0.3679285
[2,] 0.4985409 0.61026876 0.4134485
[3,] 0.3209792 0.60056130 0.8887652
[4,] 0.0160972 0.06534362 0.2618056

You can keep the dimension names simply by adding the .dims argument:

dimnames(MyArray) <- Map(paste0, letters[seq_along(dim(MyArray))],
                                  lapply(dim(MyArray), seq))

alply(MyArray,3,.dims = TRUE)
$c1
    b
a           b1         b2        b3
  a1 0.4752803 0.01728003 0.1744352
  a2 0.7144411 0.13353980 0.1069188
  a3 0.2429445 0.60039428 0.8610824
  a4 0.9757289 0.71712288 0.5941202

$c2
    b
a            b1         b2        b3
  a1 0.07118296 0.43761119 0.3174442
  a2 0.16458581 0.65040897 0.5654846
  a3 0.88711374 0.07655825 0.7163768
  a4 0.07117881 0.79314705 0.9054457

$c3
    b
a            b1        b2         b3
  a1 0.04761279 0.5668479 0.04145537
  a2 0.72320804 0.2692747 0.74700930
  a3 0.82138686 0.3604211 0.57163369
  a4 0.53325169 0.8831302 0.71119421
  • Hi Jordan. Thank you very much for you quick reply. Indeed, this function is what I was looking for. But since @flodel provides the "dimname" preserving feature, I'll go with his solution. Best, Romain – RomainD Nov 26 '13 at 6:52
  • @RomainD Oh, but you give up too easily! All you had to do was scan the documentation for alply, and you'd see (as I've shown above) that keeping the dimension names is as easy as adding .dims = TRUE! – joran Nov 26 '13 at 15:36
  • Hi @joran (sorry for spelling your name wrongly the first time). Thanks for your additional info. Had you provided it at first, then I would probably have picked your solution. :) – RomainD Nov 27 '13 at 12:27
  • this should be the accepted answer. – Colonel Beauvel Apr 21 '16 at 8:03
1

There's a function array_tree() in the tidyverse's purrr package that does this with minimum fuss:

A1 <- matrix(runif(12),4,3)
A2 <- matrix(runif(12),4,3)
A3 <- matrix(runif(12),4,3)

MyList <- list(a1=A1, a2=A2, a3=A3)

MyArray <- purrr::array_tree(MyList)

$`a1`
           [,1]       [,2]       [,3]
[1,] 0.18895576 0.16225488 0.09941778
[2,] 0.69737985 0.01757565 0.84838836
[3,] 0.06849385 0.71726810 0.52981969
[4,] 0.83352338 0.90922401 0.55946707

$a2
          [,1]      [,2]       [,3]
[1,] 0.6498039 0.5015537 0.48840965
[2,] 0.7745612 0.4346254 0.40873822
[3,] 0.4169687 0.3634961 0.01878936
[4,] 0.3753315 0.3008145 0.94580448

$a3
          [,1]      [,2]      [,3]
[1,] 0.3967292 0.8117389 0.9184360
[2,] 0.5729680 0.9466026 0.4086640
[3,] 0.5744074 0.5913192 0.6038389
[4,] 0.4507735 0.2285655 0.8815671

As shown, it preserves names by default. In general this should be preferred to plyr::alply() (@joran's answer) since plyr is no longer under active development.

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