21

This question already has an answer here:

As the title says, I am trying to determine if my bash script receives a full path or a relative file to a directory as a parameter.

For some reasons the following doesn't seem to work for me:

#!/bin/bash

DIR=$1

if [ "$DIR" = /* ]
then
    echo "absolute"
else
    echo "relative"
fi

When I run my script with either a full path or absolute path it says:

./script.sh: line 5: [: too many arguments
relative

For some reasons I can't seem to figure this bug. Any ideas?

marked as duplicate by ryenus, tripleee bash Aug 15 '16 at 4:18

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

36

[ ... ] doesn't do pattern matching. /* is being expanded to the contents of /, so effectively you have

if [ "$DIR" = /bin /boot /dev /etc /home /lib /media ... /usr /var ]

or something similar. Use [[ ... ]] instead.

if [[ "$DIR" = /* ]]; then

For POSIX compliance, or if you just don't have a [[ that does pattern matching, use a case statement.

case $DIR in
  /*) echo "absolute path" ;;
  *) echo "something else" ;;
esac
  • If i give this path /home/user/folder1/../folder2 which is relative it will output that it's absolute which is wrong. – Dragos Rizescu Nov 25 '13 at 23:21
  • 14
    A relative path is one that refers to different files, depending on what the current working directory is. That path always refers to /home/user/folder2, so it is an absolute path. .. isn't just a shell shortcut; it's a very real entry in the file system for the parent of the directory it is contained in. – chepner Nov 25 '13 at 23:29
  • Apparently this only works for bash, not for (a)sh – DrumM Mar 30 '18 at 8:11
  • No, [[ is an extension supported by bash and some other shells. I'll add a POSIX-compliant version to the answer. – chepner Mar 30 '18 at 13:34
23

Just test on the first character:

if [ "${DIR:0:1}" = "/" ]
  • 4
    Works well in bash (and ksh and zsh), but just to avoid potential confusion: despite the use of [ ... ] and =, this solution is not POSIX-compliant (the POSIX shell spec. doesn't support positional substring extraction). If POSIX compliance is not a requirement, as in this case, it's generally better to use [[ ... ]]: [[ "${DIR:0:1}" == '/' ]] (or even [[ ${DIR:0:1} == '/' ]]). – mklement0 Aug 15 '16 at 2:06
5

Writing tests is fun:

#!/bin/bash

declare -a MY_ARRAY # declare an indexed array variable

MY_ARRAY[0]="/a/b"
MY_ARRAY[1]="a/b"
MY_ARRAY[2]="/a a/b"
MY_ARRAY[3]="a a/b"
MY_ARRAY[4]="/*"


# Note that 
# 1) quotes around MY_PATH in the [[ ]] test are not needed
# 2) the expanded array expression "${MY_ARRAY[@]}" does need the quotes
#    otherwise paths containing spaces will fall apart into separate elements.
# Nasty, nasty syntax.

echo "Test with == /* (correct, regular expression match according to the Pattern Matching section of the bash man page)"

for MY_PATH in "${MY_ARRAY[@]}"; do
   # This works
   if [[ $MY_PATH == /* ]]; then
      echo "'$MY_PATH' is absolute"
   else
      echo "'$MY_PATH' is relative"
   fi
done

echo "Test with == \"/*\" (wrong, becomes string comparison)"

for MY_PATH in "${MY_ARRAY[@]}"; do
   # This does not work at all; comparison with the string "/*" occurs!
   if [[ $MY_PATH == "/*" ]]; then
      echo "'$MY_PATH' is absolute"
   else
      echo "'$MY_PATH' is relative"
   fi
done

echo "Test with = /* (also correct, same as ==)"

for MY_PATH in "${MY_ARRAY[@]}"; do
   if [[ $MY_PATH = /* ]]; then
      echo "'$MY_PATH' is absolute"
   else
      echo "'$MY_PATH' is relative"
   fi
done

echo "Test with =~ /.* (pattern matching according to the regex(7) page)"

# Again, do not quote the regex; '^/' would do too

for MY_PATH in "${MY_ARRAY[@]}"; do
   if [[ $MY_PATH =~ ^/[:print:]* ]]; then
      echo "'$MY_PATH' is absolute"
   else
      echo "'$MY_PATH' is relative"
   fi
done
  • How about testing ~/a/b path? – Ivan Kovtun May 10 '18 at 23:09
4

ShellCheck automatically points out that "[ .. ] can't match globs. Use [[ .. ]] or grep."

In other words, use

if [[ "$DIR" = /* ]]

This is because [ is a regular command, so /* is expanded by the shell beforehand, turning it into

[ "$DIR" = /bin /dev /etc /home .. ]

[[ is handled specially by the shell, and doesn't have this problem.

4

One more case is paths started from ~ (tilde). ~user/some.file or ~/some.file are some kind of absolute paths.

if [[ "${dir:0:1}" == / || "${dir:0:2}" == ~[/a-z] ]]
then
    echo "Absolute"
else
    echo "Relative"
fi

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