156

I have a function that can return one of three things:

  • success (True)
  • failure (False)
  • error reading/parsing stream (None)

My question is, if I'm not supposed to test against True or False, how should I see what the result is. Below is how I'm currently doing it:

result = simulate(open("myfile"))
if result == None:
    print "error parsing stream"
elif result == True: # shouldn't do this
    print "result pass"
else:
    print "result fail"

is it really as simple as removing the == True part or should I add a tri-bool data-type. I do not want the simulate function to throw an exception as all I want the outer program to do with an error is log it and continue.

  • You are asking the wrong question; you should be asking for help defining your result ... what is the difference that you perceive between "failure" and "error parsing stream", what do they mean, what are the consequences, what action is the caller likely to want to take in each case (pass, fail, parse error)? – John Machin Jan 7 '10 at 14:01
  • I'm simulating an electrical power system, if people lose power to their houses it is a failure. If I can't read the simulation file then that is an error of a completely different kind. – James Brooks Jan 7 '10 at 14:06
  • 2
    Inside the simulate function I catch all exceptions; I don't want anything that happens inside the simulator to stop the rest of the program running (and processing the next element). But the answers are making me change my mind. – James Brooks Jan 7 '10 at 15:06
  • 1
    @James Brooks: Right. That's what try/except processing is all about. If your simulate has things it can catch and retry, that's good. But if it "fails", it should not return None. It should just raise an exception to the script that called it. Either way, simulate is done. Returning None isn't as helpful as raising a proper exception -- or allowing an exception to propagate through simulate into the calling script for handling. – S.Lott Jan 7 '10 at 15:34
  • 1
    @James, use except Exception: instead. This catches all "real" errors, along with Warning and StopIteration. It allows KeyboardInterrupt and SystemExit through though. If you really want to catch those, it's probably best to use another, outer try/except or some other structure that clearly documents your intent, since those are not "errors". (But I did say "almost never"... perhaps in your case you really do want to grab everything, and even prevent Ctrl-C or sys.exit() from exiting, etc.) – Peter Hansen Jan 22 '10 at 17:41
121

Don't fear the Exception! Having your program just log and continue is as easy as:

try:
    result = simulate(open("myfile"))
except SimulationException as sim_exc:
    print "error parsing stream", sim_exc
else:
    if result:
        print "result pass"
    else:
        print "result fail"

# execution continues from here, regardless of exception or not

And now you can have a much richer type of notification from the simulate method as to what exactly went wrong, in case you find error/no-error not to be informative enough.

| improve this answer | |
  • Agreed. Much more pythonic than the evidently more popular solution above (which smells too much like C code). – Brandon Jan 7 '10 at 13:53
  • 8
    @Brandon Not agreed. This code is longer and, worse, less readable than the solution above (or the improved version below): more indentations, more different statements - guess why the latter is more popular, as you say ... ;-) Why trying to be 'Pythonic' if that leads to more awkward code ...? – Rolf Bartstra Dec 6 '12 at 16:47
  • Now print the traceback instead of "error parsing stream" and you got my vote. – CivFan Oct 14 '15 at 19:34
  • Ok, you got my vote anyway, but I meant print something like traceback.format_exc() . See this SO answer. – CivFan Oct 22 '15 at 19:32
  • 17
    Many people will come to this page looking for the answer to the title question. For most of us "Don't fear the Exception!" has nothing to do with our situation. We just need to test for True, False, and None. While your suggested alternative is valid for some cases, I think it's best to also include an answer to the question as it was asked. – vastlysuperiorman Jan 29 '16 at 22:09
175
if result is None:
    print "error parsing stream"
elif result:
    print "result pass"
else:
    print "result fail"

keep it simple and explicit. You can of course pre-define a dictionary.

messages = {None: 'error', True: 'pass', False: 'fail'}
print messages[result]

If you plan on modifying your simulate function to include more return codes, maintaining this code might become a bit of an issue.

The simulate might also raise an exception on the parsing error, in which case you'd either would catch it here or let it propagate a level up and the printing bit would be reduced to a one-line if-else statement.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    The latter is kind of an explicit test against True or False, isn't it? – Peter Eisentraut Jan 7 '10 at 13:42
  • 1
    of course, but knowing that these are only possible return values, I don't think it's a problem. – SilentGhost Jan 7 '10 at 13:43
  • and it seem to be a bit faster as well – SilentGhost Jan 7 '10 at 13:45
  • a = 'foo' if a: print 'its true' a is not actually TRUE, it's just not none – wesm Apr 3 '15 at 21:06
  • and just not False – 00schneider Aug 13 at 11:16
14

Never, never, never say

if something == True:

Never. It's crazy, since you're redundantly repeating what is redundantly specified as the redundant condition rule for an if-statement.

Worse, still, never, never, never say

if something == False:

You have not. Feel free to use it.

Finally, doing a == None is inefficient. Do a is None. None is a special singleton object, there can only be one. Just check to see if you have that object.

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Testing for equality with True is not redundant (although I agree it's not sensible). It could be calling an __eq__ or other special method, which could do practically anything. – Scott Griffiths Jan 8 '10 at 11:43
  • 5
    @Scott Griffiths: Good point. That's a truly and deeply horrifying scenario. If that's actually the case, the program violates our fundamental expectations in a way that makes it something that needs to be simply deleted and rewritten from scratch without such black magic. – S.Lott Jan 8 '10 at 12:47
  • 84
    'Never, never, never' ...? There are cases though that if something == True yields a different result than if something, e.g. for non-boolean something. 2==True yields false whereas 2 evaluates to true; None==False is false but not None is true! – Rolf Bartstra Dec 6 '12 at 16:26
  • 9
    -1 This answer misleading and completely incorrect, since what @Rolf Bartstra says is true. Although in this case, what you say can be applied. – HelloGoodbye Jan 22 '14 at 19:18
  • 3
    -1. Since any non-zero or non-empty or non-zero-length value for something returns True on bool(something). In that case, if you ONLY want to check if something has a value of True i.e. bool. Then you HAVE to do if something == True IMO. – Samarth Shah Aug 23 '15 at 18:54
2

I would like to stress that, even if there are situations where if expr : isn't sufficient because one wants to make sure expr is True and not just different from 0/None/whatever, is is to be prefered from == for the same reason S.Lott mentionned for avoiding == None.

It is indeed slightly more efficient and, cherry on the cake, more human readable.

In [1]: %timeit (1 == 1) == True
38.1 ns ± 0.116 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000000 loops each)

In [2]: %timeit (1 == 1) is True
33.7 ns ± 0.141 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000000 loops each)
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    You can not run a benchmark once and say that one is more efficient than the other one (even though it might be). Run it many times (10.000) to see how it behaves in average.\ – user1767754 Jun 1 '18 at 7:03
2

There are many good answers. I would like to add one more point. A bug can get into your code if you are working with numerical values, and your answer is happened to be 0.

a = 0 
b = 10 
c = None

### Common approach that can cause a problem

if not a:
    print(f"Answer is not found. Answer is {str(a)}.") 
else:
    print(f"Answer is: {str(a)}.")

if not b:
    print(f"Answer is not found. Answer is {str(b)}.") 
else:
    print(f"Answer is: {str(b)}")

if not c:
    print(f"Answer is not found. Answer is {str(c)}.") 
else:
    print(f"Answer is: {str(c)}.")
Answer is not found. Answer is 0.   
Answer is: 10.   
Answer is not found. Answer is None.
### Safer approach 
if a is None:
    print(f"Answer is not found. Answer is {str(a)}.") 
else:
    print(f"Answer is: {str(a)}.")

if b is None:
    print(f"Answer is not found. Answer is {str(b)}.") 
else:
    print(f"Answer is: {str(b)}.")

if c is None:
    print(f"Answer is not found. Answer is {str(c)}.") 
else:
    print(f"Answer is: {str(c)}.")

Answer is: 0.
Answer is: 10.
Answer is not found. Answer is None.
| improve this answer | |
1

I believe that throwing an exception is a better idea for your situation. An alternative will be the simulation method to return a tuple. The first item will be the status and the second one the result:

result = simulate(open("myfile"))
if not result[0]:
  print "error parsing stream"
else:
  ret= result[1]
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    returning tuple usually goes well with unpacking a tuple ;) – SilentGhost Jan 7 '10 at 13:42
  • 2
    your code, however, doesn't make much sense, if False is returned, it'll print 'error parsing stream'. – SilentGhost Jan 7 '10 at 13:46
  • The simulate method should return (False, "anything at all") or (True, ret) where ret is either False or True. – kgiannakakis Jan 7 '10 at 14:16
  • 2
    well, you're re-defining the output values to suit your logic, it isn't clear w/o an explanation – SilentGhost Jan 7 '10 at 14:44

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