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What's a fast way to round up an unsigned int to a multiple of 4?

A multiple of 4 has the two least significant bits 0, right? So I could mask them out and then do a switch statement, adding either 1,2 or 3 to the given uint.

That's not a very elegant solution..

There's also the arithmetic roundup:

 myint == 0 ? 0 : ((myint+3)/4)*4

Probably there's a better way including some bit operations?

6
  • First you should start by defining "next" (and by writing a spec: blogs.msdn.com/ericlippert/archive/2009/11/19/…). Jan 7, 2010 at 17:23
  • His code looks to attempt to aligned on a boundary of 4?
    – user7116
    Jan 7, 2010 at 17:28
  • You should clarify what "next" means when myint is a multiple of 4. Your arithmetic roundup leaves myint unchanged, but several answerers have understood "next" in that case to mean myint + 4.
    – JaakkoK
    Jan 7, 2010 at 17:29
  • For example, "next" could mean the number x with x > n for a given n, or with x >= n, or the number x so that |x-n| is minimal for the given n, or... Jan 7, 2010 at 17:31
  • uhm yes - i mean - if an int is not dividable by 4, it should be rounded up to the next higher multiple of 4
    – genesys
    Jan 7, 2010 at 17:32

7 Answers 7

56
(myint + 3) & ~0x03

The addition of 3 is so that the next multiple of 4 becomes previous multiple of 4, which is produced by a modulo operation, doable by masking since the divisor is a power of 2.

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  • 3
    this won't give the next multiple if the myint is already a multiple of 4 Jan 7, 2010 at 17:24
  • 2
    It does: a multiple of 4 gets its two lowest bits set, which then get masked away, leaving the original, which is how the OP's code works too.
    – JaakkoK
    Jan 7, 2010 at 17:26
  • 2
    Michael Brays criticism is correct. If myint is already a multiple of 4, it is unchanged. jk's expression gives the smallest multiple of 4 that is the same or larger than the original value. This is not what I'd genereally understand "the next multple of 4" to mean. Jan 7, 2010 at 17:40
  • it's what i meant with the question - i changed the description to fit better what i actually meant :)
    – genesys
    Jan 7, 2010 at 17:43
  • 1
    If myint is 0, this produces 0. @Stephen: The OP provided code that performs the operation he wanted, and "next multiple" can be read as rounding up (and in my experience, much more commonly is), so Michael Bray's criticism does not apply to this case.
    – JaakkoK
    Jan 7, 2010 at 17:46
19

I assume that what you are trying to achieve is the alignment of the input number, i.e. if the original number is already a multiple of 4, then it doesn't need to be changed. However, this is not clear from your question. Maybe you want next multiple even when the original number is already a multiple? Please, clarify.

In order to align an arbitrary non-negative number i on an arbitrary boundary n you just need to do

i = i / n * n;

But this will align it towards the negative infinity. In order to align it to the positive infinity, add n - 1 before peforming the alignment

i = (i + n - 1) / n * n;

This is already good enough for all intents and purposes. In your case it would be

i = (i + 3) / 4 * 4;

However, if you would prefer to to squeeze a few CPU clocks out of this, you might use the fact that the i / 4 * 4 can be replaced with a bit-twiddling i & ~0x3, giving you

i = (i + 3) & ~0x3;

although it wouldn't surprise me if modern compilers could figure out the latter by themselves.

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  • Comments from an edit (i.e. not me); "i = (i + n - 1) / n * n; (I don't think this works surely you are just doing +n-1)" and "i = (i + 3) / 4 * 4; (I don't think this works surely you are just doing +3)" Jan 25, 2011 at 11:43
  • 1
    I don't know what is meant by these comments. The expressions in my answer use integer division, which rounds its result. This means that i = (i + 3) / 4 * 4 is obviously not just + 3. Jan 25, 2011 at 18:37
5

If by "next multiple of 4" you mean the smallest multiple of 4 that is larger than your unsigned int value myint, then this will work:

(myint | 0x03) + 1;
2
  • Nice one, especially since an increment might be faster than adding a constant. But seems it's not what the OP wanted. Jan 7, 2010 at 17:40
  • it would round 4 to 8. Not the best solution
    – tstanisl
    Dec 1, 2021 at 16:23
1

(myint + 4) & 0xFFFC

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  • 1
    I suppose this depends on how "next" is defined when the number is already divisible by 4.
    – tvanfosson
    Jan 7, 2010 at 17:26
  • 4
    This also depends upon the size of myint being 2 bytes, and sets the most significant bytes to 0 if sizeof myint > 2. Jan 7, 2010 at 17:37
  • @Alok: true, but trivial to fix. Jan 7, 2010 at 17:57
  • 4
    The trivial fix is to use ~0x3, which is independent of the size of int. Jan 7, 2010 at 18:09
  • 1
    @Michael: I was being pedantic, because this is a programming website. Your answer, in the current form, is wrong. No offense meant (and no, I didn't downvote you). Jan 8, 2010 at 7:01
0

If you want the next multiple of 4 strictly greater than myint, this solution will do (similar to previous posts):

(myint + 4) & ~3u

If you instead want to round up to the nearest multiple of 4 (leaving myint unchanged if it is a multiple of 4), this should work:

(0 == myint & 0x3) ? myint : ((myint + 4) & ~3u);
-1

myint = (myint + 4) & 0xffffffc

This is assuming that by "next multiple of 4" that you are always moving upwards; i.e. 5 -> 8 and 4 -> 8.

-1

This is branch-free, generally configurable, easy to understand (if you know about C byte strings), and it lets you avoid thinking about the bit size of myInt:

myInt += "\x00\x03\x02\x01"[myInt & 0x3];

Only downside is a possible single memory access to elsewhere (static string storage) than the stack.

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