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I have a simple select statement. I want to add a temporary column that will represent number the of rows in my result set. I tried this -

declare @num int
set @num = 0;
select t.A, t.B, t.C, (@count + 1) as number
from tableZ as t

It assigns the 1 to all rows. I tried @count = @count + 1 and it did not work. How do I do this thing in a simple manner?

thanks.

4
  • 1
    How do you want the row number to increment? Arbitrary? Your query doesn't have an ORDER BY, so, you need to define what you expect the ordering to be. Nov 27, 2013 at 2:11
  • 1
    @AaronBertrand - I only need my rows to be numbered. Order is not really necessary. Does that answer your question ? Nov 27, 2013 at 2:12
  • 1
    So you're okay with the order being applied randomly, and the results being spit out to your query in an inconsistent order every time? Nov 27, 2013 at 2:14
  • stackoverflow.com/questions/26160970/…
    – Waqar
    Jun 27, 2022 at 17:34

2 Answers 2

129
SELECT
    t.A,
    t.B,
    t.C,
    ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY (SELECT 1)) AS number
FROM tableZ AS t

See working example at SQLFiddle

Of course, you may want to define the row-numbering order – if so, just swap OVER (ORDER BY (SELECT 1)) for, e.g., OVER (ORDER BY t.C), like in a normal ORDER BY clause.

3
  • Why does adding where number = 1 or some other where clause based of number throw an invalid column error? Is there any way to add a where clause based on the number column? Jul 29, 2019 at 15:00
  • 1
    @CJEdgerton Because of the way a SELECT statement is parsed/read. The WHERE clause is calculated before aliases in the SELECT list are materialized. So to work around it you can just put the SELECT in a CTE/subquery and then use a where clause when selecting from that. Apr 14, 2020 at 23:15
  • this information was helpful Mar 20 at 5:53
87

The typical pattern would be as follows, but you need to actually define how the ordering should be applied (since a table is, by definition, an unordered bag of rows). One way to do that if you don't care about a specific order otherwise is to use the leading key(s) of a covering index, the leading key(s) of the clustered index, or the columns in any group by / order by clauses. In this case I'll assume A is the single-column clustering key for t:

SELECT t.A, t.B, t.C, number = ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY t.A)
  FROM dbo.tableZ AS t
  ORDER BY t.A;

If you truly don't care about order, you can generate arbitrary/nondeterministic row numbering using:

ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY @@SPID)

-- or for serial plans

ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY @@TRANCOUNT)

Little tricks I picked up from Paul White in this article (see "Paul's Solution").

Not sure what the variables in your question are supposed to represent (they don't match).

1

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