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I am displaying data on a page that holds 15 rows per page. I am using the OFFSET & FETCH keywords of SQL Server 2012 to limit to the 15 rows I want. However, I want to display the TOTAL number of rows that are available, how do I do this in a single query?

For example, at the top of the page, you are viewing 15 of 1505 records.

Is there a way I can combine this with my existing query?

  • I resolved this particular scenario by using the SQLDataReader and querying two separate tables. One table for the 15 records, then another query using the Count() function to call the total records. – Pearce Nov 27 '13 at 15:27
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As others have demonstrated, you can do it but rather than use COUNT as they're demonstrating, I'm going to leverage the system metatdata which is a hell of a lot faster. Physically, calling SELECT COUNT(1) AS rc FROM MyTable is going to force the storage engine to enumerate through all the data that may or may not be in memory to perform a count and wait for any exclusive locks to be unlocked.

You know what's more efficient? Just looking at sys.allocation_units.

SELECT
    s.[Name] as [Schema] 
,   t.[name] as [Table] 
,   SUM(p.rows) as [RowCount] 
FROM
    sys.schemas s 
    LEFT OUTER JOIN 
        sys.tables t 
        ON s.schema_id = t.schema_id 
    LEFT OUTER JOIN 
        sys.partitions p 
        ON t.object_id = p.object_id 
    LEFT OUTER JOIN  
        sys.allocation_units a 
        ON p.partition_id = a.container_id 
WHERE
    p.index_id  in(0,1) -- 0 heap table , 1 table with clustered index 
    AND p.rows is not null
    AND a.type = 1  -- row-data only , not LOB 
GROUP BY 
    s.[Name] 
,   t.[name] 
ORDER BY 
    1 
,   2; 

h/t to bimonkey for his post Count the number of rows in every Table in a Database in no time!

If you want a "single" query that does this, then you'll need to combine the above with your offset and fetch.

In SQL, do not be fooled by equating fewer lines of code with lower complexity or better performance.

I have annotated the following query as it's really rather simple.

-- Create variables for our usage
-- http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms188927.aspx
DECLARE @OFFSET int = 30
,   @FETCH int = 15;

-- Notice the previous statement ends with a semicolon (;)
-- The following structure is a Common Table Expression (CTE)
-- Think of it as a single use View
-- http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms190766(v=sql.105).aspx
WITH COUNTS AS
(
    -- This query provides the number of rows in all the tables
    -- in the current catalog. It is screaming cheetah wheelies fast 
    -- as it does not need to physically read each row from each table
    -- to generate counts. Instead, it is using system metadata to 
    -- derive the row count.
    -- After the closing ), I will have access to a tabular structure
    -- called COUNTS 
    SELECT
        s.[Name] as [Schema] 
    ,   t.[name] as [Table] 
    ,   SUM(p.rows) as [RowCount] 
    FROM
        -- http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms176011.aspx
        sys.schemas s 
        LEFT OUTER JOIN 
            -- http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms187406.aspx
            sys.tables t 
            ON s.schema_id = t.schema_id 
        LEFT OUTER JOIN 
            -- http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms175012.aspx
            sys.partitions p 
            ON t.object_id = p.object_id 
        LEFT OUTER JOIN  
            -- http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms189792.aspx
            sys.allocation_units a 
            ON p.partition_id = a.container_id 
    WHERE
        p.index_id  in(0,1) -- 0 heap table , 1 table with clustered index 
        AND p.rows is not null
        AND a.type = 1  -- row-data only , not LOB 
    GROUP BY 
        s.[Name] 
    ,   t.[name] 
)
SELECT
    T.*
,   @OFFSET AS StartingRow
,   @FETCH AS PageSize
-- A subquery that uses the CTE above to extract our table's total row count
-- The table and schema below must align with the value in your FROM clause
-- http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms189575(v=sql.105).aspx
,   (SELECT C.[RowCount] FROM COUNTS C WHERE C.[schema] = 'dbo' AND C.[Table] = 'MyTable') AS TotalRows
FROM
    dbo.MyTable T
ORDER BY
    1
-- http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg699618.aspx    
OFFSET 30 ROWS
FETCH NEXT 15 ROWS ONLY;
  • Thanks for your advice, Your query kinda blew my mind so I went with the count approach, but its good to know there is a more efficient way instead of count when I really need it. – Pearce Nov 27 '13 at 15:30
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You could use COUNT():

SELECT COUNT(*) FROM Table
WHERE conditionHere

And then the per page count you have to do it in your programming language of choice be it php or asp.net for example.

And basically the computations goes like this:

PageNumber * RecordsPerPage

Let's say Page Number 2 with 15 Records Per Page would be:

2 * 15

So, your output would be

30 of NumberOfRecords

You could count by the way the pages using the formula

TotalPages = CEILING(TotalRecords / RecordsPerPages)

For example using your own figures, it would be:

TotalPages = CEILING(1,505 / 15)

Which is 101 if you get the ceiling value.

If Php it would probably look like this:

$TotalPages = Ceil($NumberOfRecords / $RecordsPerPages)

If ASP using C# it would probably look like this:

int TotalPages = Math.Ceil(NumberOfRecords/RecordsPerPages);

However, if they lick the last Page is clicked then you could simply put:

TotalRecords of TotalRecords

For example:

1,505 of 1,505

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